Baby Not Sleeping at Night? : Excellent, Expert Solutions is Here!


This post is great for parents whose babies  are not sleeping at night. It provides expert solutions for you & baby.
Help! My baby won’t sleep at nights!

I understand what you are going though Mamas! Really I do. I have been there and, I have done that. I have five kids, so I really know what you are experiencing. I remember the crankiness during the postpartum weeks. It was such a task those first two months for me, but thank God I got through. Just like you can. Today I am going to help you to get some relief in how you can put into play some strategies to get your little star to safely sleep at night. Many babies begin sleeping on what’s called a day/night reversal schedule. Your baby sleeps well during the day, but is awake and busy at night. It’s frustrating and exhausting, but it’s temporary. This can last about 2-3 months.

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All babies are different. What I mean is they experience changes at different times. Mamas whether you like it or not we all as new parents will go through times when our little ones stay up pretty late at nights. Babies usually have things going on at different stages of development. Lets begin:

1. Growth spurts can affect sleep

Mamas growth spurts matter!

After coming home from hospital ,you may begin to notice that your baby is constantly crying or irritable and you are wondering what is going on. Your infant will gain three times her birth weight and grow eight to ten inches in length in her first year of life. This improvements are both consistent and sporadic, with strides in brain and body growth occurring every few days or weeks throughout the first year. Frustration and disturbances in your baby’s sleeping and eating habits can precede these days of rapid growth and development.

A recent research conducted in Sleep Medicine by McGill University looked at the sleep habits of 44 babies over two weeks. The researchers discovered that sleeping habits differ considerably not only from baby to baby, but also from night to night for the same baby.

Day 2: Newborn growth spurts occur during the first two days of life—usually night 2—and are more of a “protest” of leaving the womb than a true growth spurt. For newborns, this is a gassy time when their gut flora establishes itself in preparation for the end of colostrum and the arrival of mature breast milk.
2 or 3 weeks
4 to 6 weeks
three months
6 month period
9-month period
12 month period

Growth spurts come at different stages of development

Dad chipping in can give mom a sense of relief

Your child’s development spurts will begin as she progresses from toddlerhood to puberty and then into adolescence. They get taller and more stretched out with time, but they also adopt the same trend as their first baby development spurts, with temporary bouts of appetite, irritability, aches and pains, and a desire for more sleep.

Sleep patterns alter during this time.
Your little star  is having longer and more regular naps, and  waking up more at night for feedings—just when you thought she’d settled into a schedule! According to studies, hormones that promote bone growth are produced during sleep, so a few days of increased napping could result in a measurable change in height, but it could also interrupt overnight sleep in the days following.

When will my baby sleep throughout the night?

Every parent will experience some fussiness which is quite normal

Most babies don’t start sleeping through the night (about 6 to 8 hours) until they are about 3 months old, or until they weigh 12 to 13 pounds, according to experts at Stanford Children’s Health. Furthermore, at the age of six months, only about two-thirds of babies are able to sleep through the night on a daily basis.

Sleep disturbances in infants aged 0 to 3 months
Babies are also adapting to a normal sleeping schedule when they are newborns.

In a 24-hour cycle, newborns sleep around 14 to 17 hours, waking up regularly for feedings both day and night.

A one- and two-month-old can sleep for 14 to 17 hours a day, divided into eight to nine hours at night and another seven to nine hours during the day.

In a 24-hour cycle, a 3-month-old needs 14 to 16 hours of sleep.

And with all the snoozing, it can seem that your baby isn’t getting enough rest. Since they need to feed too much, very young babies often sleep in brief, catnap-like bursts.

So, if your sweetpea appears to be bouncing back and forth between dozing and awakening, don’t give up. Isn’t that perfectly normal?

1. Develop a regular routine for your child from young

Most babies soon respond to a consistent routine

Parents did you know that you could develop a regular routine for your child. The younger, the better. I have recommended this to many of my clients and they are singing the praises of these expert tested advisors. I recommend that you try them and see what works for you. Remember that no baby is the same. We all as humans have our own uniqueness. If one thing does not work, try another. Bedtime routines are a collection of events that you repeat every night in the same order. They help children feel more safe, relaxed, and calm as they prepare for bed by easing the transition from waking to sleeping.

(baby Car seat)

2. Stick with the same time

It’s easy: if you keep adjusting your child’s sleep schedule, it will be more difficult to get them to nap and sleep through the night. Apart from special occasions (holidays, birthdays, vacations), make sure your child remains on track and that you maintain your everyday routine. Always begin and end with the same time. Developing good sleep habits now would benefit both you and your child in the long run!

3. Ensure a quiet environment, soft music, and a nice bath for your little star

Photo by William Fortunato on Pexels.com

Everyone sleeps better in a calm environment. Do you agree? Children are no different than their parents when it comes to this. Ensuring a quiet environment might work wonders for your baby.

When considering how to put a baby to sleep, timing is just as important as a routine. “At around 8 weeks, babies have a rise in melatonin, a drowsy-making hormone the body releases when it’s time for sleep, which means they’re ready for an early bedtime consistent with the sun setting,” says Turgeon. “If you keep them up late instead, they become overstimulated and harder to put down.

” Melatonin levels rise somewhere around sundown, but given that sundown can be anytime from 4:30 in winter to 8:30 in summer, stick to the clock and put your baby down around 6:30 or 7 p.m. for the most success. If the sun is still up, close the shades. What really worked for me was giving my babies a bath, massage, swaddling, and playing instrumental, soft music, low or no lighting.

4.Avoid baby snacking

Mamas remember not all the time your baby cries he/she is hungry

“Sleep and nutrition are closely intertwined,” Prueher says. A baby should be fed on demand every 2 to 2.5 hours for the first 8 weeks. “They might not be eating enough at each session if they want to eat every hour or so,” Prueher says. Keep a 24-hour record of how many ounces and when a bottle-fed baby drinks. If your baby is breastfed, keep track of how long they nurse each session. This is referring to the breastfed babies.

“They’re only snacking if they eat for 20 minutes during the nighttime feeding but just five to ten minutes during the day,” Prueher says. “And they aren’t getting enough food to sleep through the night.”

On the other hand, by 2.5 to 3 months, if Baby is eating well during the day, they should be able to sleep for a 4- to 6-hour period at night. . Focus on spreading out your baby’s meals (distract them with a pacifier or other entertainment) so they’re genuinely hungry each time. Sometimes, don’t forget to burp. “Often we misinterpret coming off the breast or bottle as done when the baby just needs to be burped,” Prueher explains. Distracting factors include bright lights and noise. So Mama try cutting out the bright lights and allow a dim or no light at all.

5. Encourage napping!

Napping helps with the emotional and physical development of babies!

Sleep and napping does wonders for your baby. While it might be tempting to let your sweetie sleep in their car seat or on your stomach, you should try to get at least one nap in the crib every day. They’ll be able to get the rest they need in this manner. “An infant’s first nap is psychologically restorative and can determine how the rest of the day goes,” Prueher says. “Ideally, you want them to have that one in their crib at home.”

“The second is that it is psychologically restorative.”Your baby will have longer awake periods by 3 to 4 months of age, and you should start working on a nap schedule: one in the morning, one in the early afternoon, and a brief late-afternoon nap if needed. Prueher adds that naps are a perfect time to practice putting Baby down drowsy. You will think more clearly, pick up on cues, and follow through because it isn’t the middle of the night.

“You should pause before jumping in as long as you know they can’t be hungry,” says Turgeon, who suggests beginning a “soothing ladder” from day one. Pause for a moment when you hear your baby fuss to see if they can figure it out on their own. “If they can’t, go in and do the least disruptive thing you can—pat them or shush them, just don’t pick them up,” Turgeon advises.

I advise you to perform the same routine for at least 2- 3 weeks. This gives your baby time to adjust to the new routine. If its getting better continue. If its getting worse or the same, it is time to try another routine or technique. So you can stop googling a million things to do .

6. Try taking baby for a ride

A simple ride can be your solution to a good night’s sleep

This one worked occasionally for me. There were times when I tried everything it seemed and this was my last resort. Many of my parents also claimed that this worked for them. I do not know what it is ,but a minute after driving my baby would get quiet and before you know it, she was fast asleep. Then me and dad would jump for joy with relief. (Mattress link)

7.Try shushing your baby

Shushing after a nice warm bath, messaging, swaddling, & soft music can be epic!

Some babies can become exhausted after a long day. You can help your baby by shushing your baby to sleep, ensuring that they are well swaddled and comfortable. Shushing is simply mimicking the womb. This can be a comfort for your baby, especially during the early days. Experts claim they are reminded about their previous home in the womb and are comforted.

If you have a smartphone, download the White Noise app and give it a try. It doesn’t have to be right next to your baby’s crib, but it should be loud enough to be heard over the background noise. If you don’t have access to a mobile phone or a laptop that can download software, invest in a white noise machine (preferably one that is portable) and your life will be transformed.

8. Check baby at intervals

I would encourage you to try to get baby to sleep without him / her not sleeping in your arms. This is the best feeling in the world. Awesome Mamas! Your baby will cry alot at the first start of training but just check at 10 minute intervals checking on baby. You do not have to feel guilty at all, because you want in the long run is to have baby go to sleep on her own.

9. Try a Pacifier

You can also try a pacifier!

Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is the sudden and unexplained death of a baby younger than 1 year old. A diagnosis of SIDS is made if the baby’s death remains unexplained even after a death scene investigation, an autopsy, and a review of the clinical history. Pacifiers are are considered okay according to the American Academy of pediatrics as long as breastfeeding is established which is usually 4 weeks after baby is doing well with the breastfeeding. Pacifiers also help to prevent sudden infant death syndrome.

10.Do not let baby sleep in your bed

Co bedding in the same bed is a no, no Mama!

One of the biggest mistakes couples make is allowing baby to sleep in their bed. This creates a normalcy for baby and makes it very difficult for both parents to have baby moved to another area. From day one you should try to stay close to baby but do not let baby sleep in your bed. Consistency is key in all these routines. (Crib link)

Bottom line

Your baby not sleeping at nights can be very infuriating for both parents and baby. We realize that babies are going to be challenged at some point with sleep. We must remember that there is no cut out routine for all babies. The different skills are available for you to try and see what works. What works for you may not work for your friend because everyone is different in their own way. I hope something works for you. Thank you for stopping by today and do come again. If you are pregnant I would like to wish you a safe , happy delivery. I hope each of you reading this find something that works for you. May God bless you and yours.


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Breastfeeding and Your Stuffy Baby: Learn the Strategies to Give Relief


We all have experienced a stuffy nose at some time. Hence we know the issue our little stars have when they develop it.

All babies will eventually get a stuffy nose or catch a cold. Now I know no one wants to see their baby with a cold or stuffy because we all know how uncomfortable it is. Every mother I am sure does not enjoy seeing their little star with a congested nose while breast or bottle feeding. Did you know that a cold is actually helping to naturally build up. Years ago when I was having my babies I was always fearful about breastfeeding while they had a stuffy nose. I know many of you are feeling the same way. I had to take care of that stuffiness first.

Nasal congestion while feeding is very common among babies, as you know their breathing organs are really small and to top it off they depend on you to clear it. Did you know some colds babies experienced happen because of allergies? A congested nose may seem simple, but a baby trying to suck for feeds can really be stressful for both mom and baby. I am going to give you some solutions to helping your baby to breastfeed your baby while congested.

Solutions For A Stuffy nose

Photo by Katie E on Pexels.com
  1. of the first things I did when my babies were stuffy was to first confirm with my pediatrician what I could use. Please find out from your pediatrician what is best for your baby. My pediatrician told me about saline solution that really worked for me. All the time! Add one to two drops of saline to each nostril or as directed by your doctor. Wait for one to two minutes. You can use saline drops to loosen thick mucus before using the bulb syringe.

2.Use a bulb syringe. Be careful when you use this after meals as it can cause your baby to vomit. A bulb syringe can clear your baby’s nose effectively.

How to use a bulb syringe

  • Squeeze it first to remove the air inside the bulb syringe.
  • Gently insert the tip of the bulb syringe onto your baby’s nostrils. Make sure that the tip is slightly pointing away from the middle of the nose so that it won’t hurt your baby.
  • Gently release the bulb to create a suction. The suction will pull out the mucus from the nose.
  • Remove the bulb syringe and wash or wipe it to remove the mucus.
  • Repeat for the other nostril.
  • Try breastfeeding your baby in an upright position: This position is very comfortable and can be the key to having your baby breastfeeds successfully.
  • Breastfeed as often as possible. The sessions may be shorter but stay consistent.
  • A running humidifier or a steaming shower in a closed bathroom is also a great way to loosen mucus from your baby’s nose.
  • Some experts suggest using some of your breast milk into your baby’s nose helps to loosen it.
  • Try different breastfeeding positions until you get it right for you and baby.
  • Use pillows to aide your comfort while breastfeeding. If you are lying down , you can also support your baby’s back.
  • Australian or Koala hold position can be amazing!

This position is great while sitting on a chair or on your bed, place your baby on your lap facing you with his two legs apart (like your baby is riding a saddle). You can support your baby’s head and neck with one hand and place him on your breast. Once your baby is positioned, you can recline to support your back.

  • Give your baby gentle, affection by rubbing his head, cuddling , and keeping him close.
  • A warm bath can also do the job. If your baby is old enough to play some toys might bring some delight.
  • Get the air quality in your home clean. The filters in your air conditioning occasionally need changing. Cigarette smoking can also be a hazard and reduce the quality of the air in the home for baby. Keep baby from cigarette smoke.

Hypoallergic products work for some moms

For newborns and babies who are extra sensitive, it is better to use hypoallergenic products, especially those that come in contact with their skin like pillows, blankets, towels and toiletries. No stuffed toys allowed.

According to the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has highlighted the benefits breastfeeding has on a baby’s immune system, too, saying:

that breast milk has many beneficial properties which included nutritional and immunological. Did you know that it is ok to breastfeed your baby when you or your baby has a cold or stuffy nose ?It is important to continue to breastfeed so that your antibodies can be passed on to your little star. These antibodies will help your infant conquer the cold germs quickly and effectively and possibly avoid developing the cold altogether. Babies breath through their mouths while breastfeeding and through their nose when not breastfeeding.

Breastfeeding your baby with a congested nose I know can be difficult, but I would like to encourage you to continue because you are really giving your baby some special antibodies that formula does not provide.

What Are The Causes Of A Stuffy Nose?

There are many reasons why babies get a stuffy nose occurs. There is a build up of mucus and swelling in the nasal passages.

The common causes of stuffy nose in babies are due to:

  • Air pollutants (cigarette smoke)
  • Dry air
  • Allergens (dust, pollens, animal dander)
  • Viruses (colds)

Non- Recommended Relief For A Baby’s Stuffy nose

According to the US Food and Drug Administration, you should not give over the counter medication to children younger than 2 years of age. Only use medications prescribed by your doctor.

Bottom line

Breastfeeding your baby with a stuffy nose can be difficult and uncomfortable. I encourage you to try some of the strategies above. and see what works for you and your baby. I hope you found this post helpful. Thank you for stopping by today and do come again. Please like / comment about this post if you want to.

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How To Overcome Backache During Pregnancy: Easy solutions At Your fingertips


At some point during your pregnancy Mamas, you may experience back ache. My mom used to say when I was having my kids that if I had backache I was having a boy. Well I proved my mom right because I never had backache and I gave birth to 4 girls. lol! scientificully, thats not proven yet. There are some things I will share with you that can help you with your back ache, but lets try to understand why that happens.

The Causes of Backache during pregnancy

Pregnancy back pain typically happens where the pelvis meets your spine, at the sacroiliac joint.

  • Muscle separation. As the uterus expands, two parallel sheets of muscles (the rectal abdominis muscles), which run from the rib cage to the pubic bone, may separate along the center seam. This separation may worsen back pain.
  •  Stress . Emotional stress can cause muscle tension in the back, which may be felt as back pain or back spasms. You may find that you experience an increase in back pain during stressful periods of your pregnancy.
  • Weight gain . During a healthy pregnancy, women typically gain between 25 and 35 pounds. The spine has to support that weight. That can cause lower back pain. The weight of the growing baby and uterus also puts pressure on the blood vessels and nerves in the pelvis and back.
  •  Posture changes. Pregnancy shifts your center of gravity. As a result, you may gradually — even without noticing — begin to adjust your posture and the way you move. This may result in back pain or strain.
  •  Hormone changesDuring pregnancy, your body makes a hormone called relaxin that allows ligaments in the pelvic area to relax and the joints to become looser in preparation for the birth process. The same hormone can cause ligaments that support the spine to loosen, leading to instability and pain.
  • Balance the weight between 2 bags when carrying shopping
  • keep your back straight and well supported when sitting at work and at home – look for maternity support pillows
  • get enough rest, particularly later in pregnancy
  • a massage or warm bath may help
  • use a mattress that supports you properly – you can put a piece of hardboard under a soft mattress to make it firmer, if necessary
  • go to a group or individual back care class
  • You can take paracetamol to ease back pain while you are pregnant, unless your GP or midwife says not to. Always follow the instructions on the packet.

Here are some things you can try

  •  Exercise Regular exercise strengthens muscles and boosts flexibility. That can ease the stress on your spine. Safe exercises for most pregnant women include walking, swimming , and stationary cycling. Your doctor or physical therapist can recommend exercises to strengthen your back and abdomen.
  •  Heat and Cold . Applying heat and cold to your back may help. If your health care provider agrees, start by putting cold compresses (such as a bag of ice or frozen vegetables wrapped in a towel) on the painful area for up to 20 minutes several times a day. After two or three days, switch to heat — put a heating pad or hot water bottle on the painful area. Be careful not to apply heat to your abdomen during pregnancy.
  •  Improve your posture. Slouching strains your spine. So using proper posture when working, sitting, or sleeping is a good move. For example, sleeping on your side with a pillow between the knees will take stress off your back. When sitting at a desk, place a rolled-up towel behind your back for support; rest your feet on a stack of books or stool and sit up straight, with your shoulders back. Wearing a support belt may also help.
  •  Counseling. If back pain is related to stress, talking to a trusted friend or counselor may be helpful.
  •  Acupuncture Acupuncture is a form of Chinese medicine in which thin needles are inserted into your skin at certain locations. Studies have shown that acupuncture can be effective in relieving low back pain during pregnancy. Check with your health care provider if you’re interested in trying it.
  •  Chiropractic. When performed correctly, chiropractic manipulation of the spine can be safe during pregnancy, but consult with your doctor before seeking chiropractic care.
  • If you need to pick something up from the ground, use your legs to squat rather than bend over.
  •  Don’t wear high-heeled shoes.
  • Sleep on your side or abdomen .
  •  Wear support hose.

When should I seek medical attention?

If your back pain persists, you may want to consult your doctor to see what else you might try. Be sure to consult your doctor before taking pain medications. Acetaminophen (Tylenol) is safe for most women to take during pregnancy. Aspirin and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) or naproxen (Aleve) are not advised. In some cases, your doctor may recommend other pain medicines or muscle relaxants that are safe during pregnancy your doctor right away if you experience any of the following:

  • Severe pain
  • Increasingly severe pain or pain that begins abruptly
  • Rhythmic cramping pains
  • Difficulty urinating or “pins and needles” in your extremities
  • In rare cases, severe back pain may be related to problems such as pregnancy-associated osteoporosis, vertebral osteoarthritis, or septic arthritis. Be careful, rhythmic pains may be a sign of preterm labor. So if you are experiencing any of these problems, it’s important to be checked by your doctor.

Bottom line

Backache is a common problem in pregnancy. It is nagging and uncomfortable. If you are experiencing backache just now, I suggest that you try some of the recommendations above. I just hope that something works for you. Remember God cares for you so you can also ask for His help. Thank you for stopping by today and I wish you every success. You can like, or comment if you would like. If you are a male, please share with your pregnant families and friends.


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Breastfeeding And Tongue Tie: Overcoming the Challenges


Tongue tie

Tongue tie can make it harder for babies to breastfeed (and sometimes bottle feed). It’s when the strip of tissue, called the ‘frenulum’ (attaching the tongue to the floor of the mouth) is shorter than normal. Tongue tie can prevent your baby from latching on properly – which can then lead to sore or cracked nipples.

Symptoms

Tongue tie can cause breastfeeding issues

Tongue tie is a condition no mother, especially a breastfeeding mother! No mother wants her baby to have this condition because it can cause issues for breastfeeding. It can even affect a child’s self esteem because it can make them talk a certain way that could be embarrassing. . Cases of tongue tie can range from mild to severe. If severe, the tongue may be completely fused to the floor of the mouth. You may be able to see if your newborn or baby has tongue tie by looking into their mouth when they’re yawning or crying, although it’s not always easy to spot. Signs of tongue tie in your baby might include:

  • your baby’s tongue doesn’t lift or move from side-to-side
  • their tongue may look heart-shaped when they stick it out
  • difficulty breastfeeding or bottle feeding (and weight gain may be slow)
  • frequent, long periods of feeding – but they seem unsettled and unsatisfied

There are many signs that a baby is having problems with breastfeeding and they may be related to tongue-tie:

  • nipple pain and damage
  • the nipple looks flattened after breastfeeding
  • you can see a compression/stripe mark on the nipple at the end of a breastfeed
  • the baby fails to gain weight well

You won’t necessarily have all these signs when you are having a problem and they can all be related to other breastfeeding problems and not necessarily related to tongue-tie. If you experience any of the signs above, you may wish to call the National Breastfeeding Helpline to speak with a breastfeeding counsellor or consider contacting a lactation consultant.

Can tongue tie affect breastfeeding?

Absolutely yes! Tongue-tie and breastfeeding. In some cases the tongue is not free or mobile enough for the baby to attach properly to the breast. Tongue-tie occurs in 4-11% of newborns and is more common in males. Some babies with tongue-tie are able to attach to the breast and suck well. However, many have breastfeeding problems, such as nipple damage.

A baby needs to be able to have good tongue function to be able to remove milk from the breast well. If the tongue is anchored to the floor of the mouth due to a tongue -tie, the baby cannot do this as well. The baby may not be able to take in a full mouthful of breast tissue. This can result in ‘nipple-feeding’ because the nipple is not drawn far enough back in the baby’s mouth and constantly rubs against the baby’s hard palate as he feeds. As a result, the mother is likely to suffer nipple trauma.

How does tongue tie affect breastfeeding mums?

However, many have breastfeeding problems, such as nipple damage, poor milk transfer and low weight gains in the baby, and possibly blocked ducts or mastitis due to ineffective milk removal. Why is a tongue-tie a problem for breastfeeding? A baby needs to be able to have good tongue function to be able to remove milk from the breast well.

  • your milk supply may reduce, as your baby is not latching on and feeding well
  • you may have sore or cracked nipples, which can make breastfeeding painful
  • poor latching on and ineffective feeding may lead to engorged breasts – which can then lead to mastitis

Not all babies with tongue tie have no problems at all. They may still be able to latch on and feed well – so not every case of tongue tie needs treatment.

If your baby does have tongue tie, it will hopefully be picked up in the first routine check by your midwife. However, tongue tie is not always easy to spot and may be discovered at a later stage (usually after feeding issues become apparent).

Diagnosis And Treatment

A website or virtual breastfeeding forum can’t diagnose a tongue-tie, your baby needs a face-to-face consultation with a specialist. A good place to start is by seeing an IBCLC lactation consultant who will take a full breastfeeding history—and assess both breastfeeding and tongue function. Your pediatrician can also diagnose tie tongue. Surgery is sometimes necessary.

If treatment is necessary, your baby will have a straightforward procedure called a ‘frenulotomy’. This is carried out by specially trained doctors, nurses or midwives – and is very quick (it takes a few seconds). Generally, no anaesthetic is used. The surgery simply involves snipping the short, tight piece of skin connecting the underside of the tongue to the floor of the mouth. As soon as it’s done, you can feed your baby (which helps to heal any bleeding).

Bottom Line

Tongue tie can certainly affect breastfeeding, making it harder for mothers to breastfeed. We know that no mother wants to discover that her newborn baby is tongue tied. Knowing the signs is the key to helping your baby to be diagnosed with the condition. There are varying degrees of tie tongue. Depending on the severity , surgery may be needed. I hope that you learned something today that will help you. Thank you for stopping by and do come again. Please like, or comment this post if you really like it and share. This website contains affiliate links, which means I earn a small commission  from products and services you purchase through my links at no extra cause to you.


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Breastfeeding And Diaper Rash: Easy Solutions To Avoid It


What Is Diaper Rash?

Diaper rash can be caused by so many agents. Lets learn all we can to keep nappy rash at bay!

You hear your baby crying hysterically, and you run to his rescue only to find that while changing his dirty nappy, he has a reddened rash on the buttocks. Your baby looks at you and cries the sign of relief that “I’m safe now ,my mommy is here.” This is the exact scenario I experienced with my baby. Hello Mamas! today we are going to learn about diaper rash and breastfeeding with easy solutions to avoid it. I want to encourage all the breastfeeding Mamas to breastfeed your child for as long as you can because diaper rash occurs less often in breastfed babies, although it isn’t completely clear why. (Paid link)

Diaper rash is characterized by bright red, inflamed skin on a baby’s bottom. Most parents attribute it to environmental factors, such as sensitivity to dyes or perfumes, infrequently changed diapers, and chafing. But did you know that itching and inflammation could actually be caused from something in your little one’s diet? Doctor Latanya Benjamin, M.D., clinical assistant professor of pediatrics and clinical assistant of dermatology at Stanford University Hospital in Palo Alto, California believes.

The Top Foods That Cause Diaper Rash

Citrus fruits and juices: These items are very acidic, which can be tough on Baby’s digestive system. Things to avoid include oranges, lemons, limes, grapefruits, and juices made from any type of citrus. 

Tomatoes and tomato-based products: Tomatoes are another highly acidic ingredient that can exaggerate symptoms of diaper rash. Your baby should also avoid spaghetti sauce, tomato soup, ketchup, and anything else that has a tomato base. 

Strawberries: Even though strawberries have a pleasing flavor, the acidity of the fruit can irritate your baby’s digestive system.

Pineapples and other tart fruits: Just because pineapple is acidic doesn’t mean your little star needs to avoid all tropical fruit. Consider trying mango or papaya instead.

What’s more, if your baby has frequent loose stools, she might develop diaper rash. It’s smart, then, to also avoid common diarrhea triggers such as dairy, fruit juice, peaches, plums, prunes, and more. My recommendation is to start with one fruit per week, instead of trying too many fruits at one time. By trying it one by one you can more easily define the culprit causing the diarrhea.

Conquering Diaper Rash Through Diet

Many babies are fed plenty of new foods when they start solids, which makes it hard to discern exactly what’s causing the negative reaction. Here’s a solution: Introduce new foods one at a time, then watch your baby for three to four days as her digestive system adapts. If you notice any negative reaction to the food, such as diaper rash, she might have a sensitivity. Consult your doctor regarding next steps; if the reaction is small, he might suggest re-introducing the food at a later date.

If your baby does develop diaper rash, feed her starchy foods that digest easily. Reliable options include pasta, bread, rice, whole grain cereal, and crackers. These will ward of diarrhea (which makes diaper rash worse) and bulk up your baby’s stool. (Paid link)

 

What Are Some Of The Other Causes Of Diaper Rash?

Now lets not think that diaper rash is only caused by food. Diaper rash can be caused by anything from your child’s own urine to a new food. Here are the most likely causes:

Although a child left in a wet or soiled diaper for too long is more likely to develop diaper rash, any child with sensitive skin can get a rash, even if you’re diligent about diaper changes.

  • Antibiotics. Children taking antibiotics (or children whose breastfeeding mothers are on antibiotics) sometimes get yeast infections because these drugs kill the healthy bacteria that keep yeast in check as well as the harmful bacteria that’s causing the illness. Antibiotics can also cause diarrhea, which can contribute to diaper rash.
  • New foods. We just read this one. Diaper rash is also common when your child first starts eating solid foods or tries a new food. Any new food changes the composition of the stool, but the acids in certain foods (such as strawberries and fruit juices) can be especially troublesome for some kids. A new food also might increase the frequency of your child’s bowel movements. If you’re breastfeeding, your child could even be having a reaction to something you ate (although breastfed children are usually less likely to get a diaper rash).
  • Bacterial or yeast infection. The diaper area is warm and moist – just the way bacteria and yeast like it. So it’s easy for a bacterial or yeast infection to flourish there and cause a rash, especially in the cracks and folds of your child’s skin. (Thrush is a type of oral yeast infection. Some children with thrush develop a yeast infection in their diaper area, too.)
  • Wetness. Even the most absorbent diaper leaves some moisture on your child’s skin. And when your child’s urine mixes with bacteria from his stool, it breaks down into ammonia, which can be very harsh on the skin. That’s why children with frequent bowel movements or diarrhea are more prone to diaper rash.
  • Chafing and chemical sensitivity. Your child’s diaper rash may be the result of his diaper rubbing against his skin, especially if he’s sensitive to chemicals, like the fragrances in a disposable diaper or the laundry detergent used to wash a cloth diaper. It could also be that a product you’re using during diaper changes irritates your child’s skin.
  • sensitivity to baby wipes
  • colon bacteria imbalance
  • cloth diaper sensitivities (to detergents or materials in cloth diapers). (Paid link).

When Should I Seek Medical Attention For Diaper Rash?

Normally with some monitoring, you should be able to clear your child’s rash in three or four days without a visit to the doctor. But do see the doctor if the rash looks as though it may be infected. A diaper rash can be caused by a yeast or bacterial infection or other conditions, you should get your doctor to take a look at the rash if it has persisted for longer than a week. Signs of infection include:

  • Blisters
  • Pus-filled pimples
  • Oozing yellow patches
  • Open sores

The doctor may prescribe a topical or oral antibiotic for your child.

For a diaper rash caused by a yeast infection, your child’s doctor may recommend an over-the-counter or prescription antifungal cream or ointment.

Also call the doctor if your child develops a fever or her rash doesn’t go away after several days of home treatment. The normal body temperature of a baby is anything between a Fahrenheit temperature of 97 degrees and 100.4 degrees. One way you can tell if your baby has a temperature is by touching or kissing his/her forehead. If the child feels hotter than usual, it’s probably because he/she has a fever.(Paid link).

Best Tips For Treating Your Little Star’s Diaper Rash

If diaper rash develops, take these steps to heal your child’s skin:

  • Dryness– Keep your child clean and dry by changing his diaper frequently. That may mean getting him up at night for a diaper change
  • Clean well– Rinse his diaper area well at each diaper change. Don’t use wipes that contain alcohol or fragrance. Some parents keep cotton balls and a squirt bottle or an insulated container of warm water at the changing table for easy, gentle cleanups.
  • Pat dry -Pat your child’s skin dry. Don’t rub!
  • Use barrier protection – Use an ointment that forms a barrier on the skin to protect your child’s irritated skin from stool and urine. You don’t have to use ointment at each diaper change: Apply a layer that’s thick enough to last through a couple diaper changes. This helps prevent further skin irritation from too much rubbing. There are several good barrier ointments available that include petroleum jelly or zinc oxide.
  • Loose fitting is key -Put your child’s diaper on loosely, or use a diaper that’s a little big on him to allow for better air circulation. If you buy disposables, try a different brand to see if that helps. There are varieties for sensitive skin, for example, and extra-absorbent options pull more moisture away from your child’s skin.
  • Air exposure is great– When the weather is warm and your child can play outside, leave his diaper (and ointment) off for as long as possible every day. Exposure to the air will speed healing.
  • Consider letting your child sleep with a bare bottom whenever he has a rash. A plastic sheet under the cloth one helps protect the mattress.

How Can I Keep Diaper Rash At Bay?

Here are some good preventive measures to keep diaper rash at bay:

  • Always remember- dry bottom is the best defense against diaper rash, so change your child’s diaper frequently or as soon as possible after it becomes wet or soiled.
  • Clean your child’s genital area thoroughly with each diaper change.
  • Pat her skin dry – never rub it. You can also use a hair dryer set on low to dry the diaper area after a diaper change.
  • If your child seems prone to diaper rash, spread a thin layer of protective ointment on her bottom after each diaper change.
  • Don’t use powders or cornstarch because the particles can be harmful to a child’s lungs if inhaled. Also, some experts think cornstarch can make a yeast diaper rash worse.
  • When your child starts eating solid foods, introduce one item at a time. Waiting a few days between each new food makes it easier to determine whether a sensitivity to a new food is causing diaper rash. If it is, eliminate that food for the time being.
  • Don’t secure the diaper so tightly that there’s no room for air to circulate. Dress her in loose clothing.
  • Use fragrance-free detergent to wash cloth diapers, and skip the fabric softener – both can irritate your child’s skin.
  • Wash diapers with hot water, and double rinse them. You also might add a half cup of vinegar to the first rinse to eliminate alkaline irritants.
  • Breastfeed your child for as long as you can because diaper rash occurs less often in breastfed babies, although it isn’t completely clear why.
  • When your child does need to take an antibiotic, ask the doctor about giving her a probiotic as well. Probiotics encourage the growth of healthy bacteria in the gut, which may reduce your child’s chances of getting a diaper rash.
  • If your child goes to daycare or preschool, make sure that her caregivers understand the importance of taking these precautions.

Bottom line

Diaper rash is quite common in babies wearing a diaper. It can have so many reasons for showing up in your baby. As a mom you should know what causes it and how to treat and prevent it. I have given you many tips and possible solutions to this condition. Never fail to see a healthcare provider if any condition is not improving. Never use power to treat a nappy rash because it can make matters worse. I wish you every success in your breastfeeding journey. Always ask God to give you His wisdom in every situation. He loves you and He cares. Thank you for visiting and do come again. Please comment and like this article if you really do. This website contains affiliate links, which means I earn a small commission  from products and services you purchase through my links at no extra cause to you.

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