The Serious Risks of Having O Negative Blood Group In Pregnancy: Maternal Treasures


Hello Mamas and dads to be! How are you doing? I want to share with you the serious risk of having the blood type of O positive. Blood grouping in pregnancy is very important. Many pregnant women are not aware of the dangers of having a blood type of O positive. There are four blood types which include type O, A, B, AB . Each one of us have one of these blood group. Do you know which type you have? When it comes to blood transfusion. It is very important to know the type of blood anyone has who is giving or receiving it. This post contains affiliate links. As an associate, I would earn a small commission if you make a purchase. Thank you for your consideration.

Having worked 36 years in the medical field, I understand the problems that pregnant women can face if this condition is untreated.

What are the different types of blood groupings?

All humans have an O, A, B, or AB blood type, as well as a positive or negative Rh factor. The blood type and Rh factor simply describe the characteristics of a person’s blood. Proteins on red blood cells and in bodily fluids reveal the blood type. The Rh factor is a protein present on the red blood cell’s outer layer. If the Rh factor protein is found on the cells, the person is said to have a decrease in the Rh factor. ( Promotional link).

Genetics play a major role

Rh factors are determined by genetics. A baby might have either parent’s blood type and Rh factor, or a mixture of both. Rh factors have a shared genetic inheritance pattern. The Rh-positive gene is dominant (stronger), and it takes precedence even when combined with a Rh-negative gene. The universal red cell donor has Type O negative blood.

A mother and baby’s blood can cause major problems.

  • If a mother has O negative blood and her baby is positive, this can cause many problems for the unborn baby.
  • Mothers who are pregnant and have O negative blood type, run the risk of their babies having jaundice and severe anemia.
  • Anemia is a below normal iron level in the blood. We need iron to take blood and nutrients to keep our cells heathy.
  • This can make the baby’s red blood cells swell and rupture.
  • This is known as hemolytic or Rh disease of the newborn. It can make a baby’s blood count get very low.
  • Babies may also need blood transfusion since the red blood cells are destroyed so rapidly.

O negative blood is the universal donor

O negative is the blood type that ca only receive from negative persons but can give blood to all of the other blood groups

Do you know what it means when it is said that O Negative blood is the universal donor? What is the reason behind this? Any blood type can be transfused with O negative blood. Because type O is the most prevalent blood type and type O negative blood is the universal blood type needed for emergency transfusions and immune weak babies, type O is frequently in low supply and in great demand by hospitals.( Promotional link).

What to expect from your blood test


One of the first tests a pregnant woman should expect is a blood-type test. This test checks her blood type and Rh factor. Her Rh factor may play a role in her baby’s health, so it’s important to know this information early in pregnancy.

What if parents are not agreeable?

When a mother-to-be and father-to-be are not both positive or negative for Rh factor, it’s called Rh incompatibility.

When is the baby in trouble?

Until the mother’s second or subsequent pregnancies, Rh antibodies are harmless. Her Rh antibodies will detect the Rh proteins on the surface of the baby’s blood cells as alien if she ever has another Rh-positive kid. Her antibodies will enter the circulation of the infant and fight those cells.

How Is Rhesus Incompatibility treated?

Rhogram is the treament given to prevent problems later with mother & baby’s blood

Doctors give a pregnant woman a course of two Rh immune-globulin shots during her first pregnancy if she has the risk of developing Rh incompatibility. The first shot will be given during the 28th week of pregnancy, and the second dose will be given within 72 hours after the baby’s delivery. Rh immune-globulin works like a vaccination. It stops the mother’s body from producing Rh antibodies, which might lead to major health problems.

A woman also might get a dose of Rh immune-globulin if she has a miscarriage, an amniocentesis, or any bleeding during pregnancy.

If a doctor finds that a woman has already developed Rh antibodies, her pregnancy will be closely watched to make sure that those levels are not too high.

In rare cases, if the incompatibility is severe and a baby is in danger, the baby can get special blood transfusions called exchange transfusions either before birth (intrauterine fetal transfusions) or after delivery.

Blood containing Rh-negative blood cells is substituted for the baby’s blood in exchange transfusions. This helps to maintain red blood cell levels while also limiting the harm caused by Rh antibodies already present in the baby’s circulation. ( Promotional link).
Exchange transfusions in Rh-incompatible pregnancies are seldom needed in the United States, thanks to the high success rate of Rh immune-globulin vaccinations.

Recommendations for all pregnant women

If you’re not sure what your Rh factor is and believe you’re pregnant, it’s critical to begin routine prenatal care as soon as possible, which should include blood-type testing. You may focus on more essential things, like welcoming a new, healthy baby, if Rh incompatibility is detected and treated early. You baby’s life depends on this. If not treated you run the risk of hurting your baby.

Bottom line

Having o negative blood during pregnancy can pose many problems for the unborn baby. If a women is aware of this condition, she can become the gate keeper for her baby by not only knowing about the baby, but also be aware of what is expected during 28th week of pregnancy and 72 hours after birth. I wish you a safe, and happy pregnancy. Dads continue to support your women at all times. She needs it.