Potty Training Success: Patient, Easy Steps to Your Child’s Victory!


Hello Mamas! Can you believe our topic today? It is one I know many of you are probably going through right now. I want to encourage you not to give up! In fact I think too many of us give up too easily. Potty training is something we all had to go through. Without a doubt, when a child reaches this stage it is a remarkable developmental stage.

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I was so happy when my babies overcame this stage. Can you imagine, no more changing or buying of pampers with a more matured baby who knows when to go to the toilet? Parents do you know what I found to be the the fastest and easiest way to potty train your baby? It takes time and plenty patience. I often hear my clients complain that their kid is taking too long to get out of pampers. (Promotional link).

What determines potty training readiness?

The effectiveness of potty training is determined by physical, developmental, and behavioral milestones rather than age. Between the ages of 18 and 24, many youngsters show symptoms of being ready for toilet training. Others, on the other hand, may not be ready until they are three years old. There’s no need to haste. It may take longer to teach your child if you begin too early. Here is a list that should help you:

  • Is your youngster able to walk to a toilet and sit on it?
  • Is your youngster able to pull his or her trousers down and back up?
  • Is your youngster capable of remaining dry for up to two hours?
  • Is your youngster able to comprehend and follow simple instructions?
  • Is your youngster able to tell you when he or she needs to go?
  • Is your youngster showing signs of wanting to use the restroom or wear “big kid” underwear?

If you responded yes to the majority of the questions, your child may be ready. If you replied largely no, you might want to hold off — especially if your child is going to go through a huge transition, such as a move or the addition of a new sibling.

1. Prepare your mind for what lies ahead

It’s also crucial that you’re prepared. Allow your child’s enthusiasm to guide the process rather than your own. Avoid equating your child’s intelligence or stubbornness with potty training success or difficulties. Also, remember that accidents are unavoidable, and punishment has no bearing on the outcome. Plan toilet training for a time when you or a caregiver will be able to dedicate the time and energy necessary to be consistent.

2. Consistency is a major key!

As a potty training mom, I have found hat consistency is one of the keys to you and you child succeeding. Once you make your mind up,to go thewhole nine yards, you must be consistent. Being consistent means ensuring that your child goes to the toilet at the specified. I trained my kids to go after meals.

Allow your kid to sit on the potty chair or toilet for a few minutes without a diaper every two hours, as well as first thing in the morning and soon after naps. It’s common for boys to master urinating while seated, then go to standing after bowel training is complete. While your child is sitting, stay with him or her and read a book or play with a toy with him or her. Allow your youngster to try new things.

It could be beneficial to make a flexible timetable, such as:

1.Before going to bed

2. When you wake up after a dinner
3.Following a routine might assist your youngster in establishing a routine.

3. Pick the right words

Choose your words carefully. Make a list of the words you’ll use to describe your child’s body fluids. Negative terms like nasty and stinking should be avoided. You can use pee, pee and poo. These two words worked wonders for me. ( Promotional link).

4. Set up the Bathroom

Make potty training as much fun as possible

Install a toilet chair in the bathroom or, at first, wherever your youngster spends the most time. To begin, encourage your youngster to sit in his or her clothing on the toilet chair. Ensure that your child’s feet are resting on the ground or a stool. Talk about the toilet in simple, pleasant words. To demonstrate their function, you may throw the contents of a soiled diaper into the potty chair and toilet. 

5. Offer praise for trying

Even if your child simply sits there, offer praise for trying — and remind your child that he or she can try again later. Bring the potty chair with you when you’re away from home with your child.

6.Respond quickly when you see the signs

 When you notice signs that your child might need to use the toilet — such as squirming, squatting or holding the genital area — respond quickly. Help your child become familiar with these signals, stop what he or she is doing, and head to the toilet. Praise your child for telling you when he or she has to go. Keep your child in loose, easy-to-remove clothing.

7. Teach your child hygiene basics

To prevent germs from spreading from the rectum to the vaginal or bladder, teach females to widen their legs and wipe gently from front to back. Afterward, make sure your youngster washes his or her hands.

8.Dump the diapers gracefully

Your kid may be ready to go from diapers to training pants or underwear after a few weeks of successful potty breaks and staying dry during the day. The transformation should be celebrated. If your child is unable to stay dry, allow him or her to return to diapers. For positive reinforcement, consider utilizing a sticker system or a star chart.

9. Be patient and stay in control Mama!

Fussing your child out all the time can bring many frustration for both of you. Staying in control helps you to be patient longer with your little star. Your kid may be ready to go from diapers to training pants or underwear after a few weeks of successful potty breaks and staying dry during the day. The transformation should be celebrated. If your child is unable to stay dry, allow him or her to return to diapers. For positive reinforcement, consider utilizing a sticker system or a star chart. Potty training takes time and lots of patience.(Promtional link).

10. Your little star will inevitably have accidents

Nap time and bedtime training are often more difficult to complete. Between the ages of 5 and 7, most youngsters can keep dry at night. In the meanwhile, while your child sleeps, use disposable training pants and mattress coverings.

11. Sit down sometimes in the beginning on the toilet

This is one of the things I did that really helped me. Who knows, it might work for you too. I would let my child see me on the toilet sometimes. Try leading by example.

12. Always ask God to help you

God is always there. Trust Him to guide you along

As I always tell you He loves and cares about everything that concerns you. Ask Him for Hi help.

BOTTOM LINE

Potty training can be frustrating for both mother and baby. Patience and consistency as a priority. Do not frustrate your child by being fussy and impatient. You little star has a higher opportunity to succeed if you are in control. Thank you for stopping by today. I hope you did learn something and enjoyed the journey.

Real Feel Potty Chair – Removable Seat for Independent Use, Virtual Flushing & Cheering Sounds, & Disposable Liners – by Jool Baby

  • PATENT PENDING: This real-feel potty imitates a real flushing sound and cheers for your kiddo too! The cushioned seat and soft aqua color make this seat inviting for both boys and girls, and the built-in splash guard ensures cleanliness.
  • Removable seat doubles as an independent training seat, compatible with most standard toilets.
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  • Spacious baby wipe compartment and extendable rod for toilet paper make this a favorite for parents. Non-slip grips keep the potty secure, and the light and compact design allows for easy transport.
  • As with all Jool Baby products, this potty includes a full satisfaction guarantee. Join millions of parents and experience the Jool Baby difference.

Pampers Easy Ups Training Pants Girls and Boys, 2T-3T (Size 4), 74 Count, Super Pack

  • 360 Stretchy Waistband Pull Ups — for an underwear-like fit that’s easy for your toddler to pull up and down
  • Pampers Extra Absorb Channels for superstar protection against leaks, day and night
  • Dance-party-proof Dual Leak-Guard Barriers prevent leaks where they happen most
  • Easy-Tear Sides for easy on and off changes and comfortable fit
  • Super soft material feels like cotton underwear
  • Rockin’ Trolls designs make potty training fun
  • Packaging and product designs may vary

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Breastfeeding And Mental Health: Excellent Tips To Stay Healthy


More than 1 in 10 mothers are likely to experience perinatal mental health!

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We know that up to 20% of women are affected by mental illness either during pregnancy or in the 12 months after giving birth. These can include anxiety and depression, postpartum psychosis and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) resulting from birth trauma or caring for an ill baby.

Breastfeeding Is a very important role, therefore supporting mothers with anxiety, depression, and any mental illness (paid link) is not an option !

Research for breastfeeding in ensuring optimal infant and maternal health is significant, as stated by the Lancet breastfeeding series 2016 and the World Health Organization and UK Department of Health Guidelines.

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Did you know that more than 1 in 10 mothers are likely to experience perinatal mental health problems?

 Breastfeeding Benefits: so vital for all babies?

  • Breastfeeding has been shown to have a positive effect on the mental wellbeing of both mother and baby when breastfeeding is going well.
  • Breastfeeding is a buffer, protective for a baby whose mother is experiencing perinatal mental health problems.
  • Depression has an inflammatory effect on the body; effective breastfeeding decreases inflammation.
  • Risk factors for depression: stress, pain, fatigue and sleep deprivation, inflammatory response,(paid link) history of

trauma, history of depression or PTSD. When breastfeeding (pd link) is going well it down-regulates these responses. 

Does Breastfeeding hormones help?

Yes they do! Do you know how? Here is the answer:

  • Breastfeeding releases oxytocin which opposes cortisol, lowering the stress response, and reducing blood pressure and anxiety.
  • Prolactin aids return to sleep and mothering instincts.

The awesome impact of breastfeeding on the baby

Here is the dynamic power of oxytocin:

  • An effective oxytocin system has long term positive consequences on self-regulation and health.
  • Oxytocin release is a conditioned response and the consequent effects can be triggered, just by the sight, voice or smell of the mother.
  • Oxytocin aids the development of secure attachment

Beware! Not satisfying the desire of a woman to breastfeed is harmful

Attempting to stop a woman from breastfeeding against her wishes puts her at an increased risk for mental health problems, leading to a low self esteem and depression.

What about breastfeeding and medication?

Every mother should be concerned about what medications are safe for her to take while breastfeeding. Most medications are safe to take whilst breastfeeding.  Appropriate prescribing is essential. Sources of information on medications are : BfN: Drugs in Breastmilk Service, Medsmilk, Lactmed, UK Drugs in Lactation Advisory Service.

Support is crucial for both mother and baby:

Support with breastfeeding goes a long way in preserving mental health
  • Understanding normal newborn behaviour and appropriate expectations.
  • Working through any difficulties allows the mum to gain confidence in her choices and allows her a sense of achievement and enjoyment in feeding her child.

Excellent Tips you can do to keep you in control of your mental health : You can do it mama!

Having good control of your mental illnesses will help you to make good decisions in pregnancy. Work to stabilize your illness as much as possible beforehand. Use the self-care techniques that help you stay mentally well during and after pregnancy.

Continue to take supplements

You can continue taking vitamins during breastfeeding!

Taking prenatal vitamins before pregnancy fills in the gaps in your diet and ensures you have enough folic acid and iron needed. You still should take these for sometime after having baby.

Weight Management

Keeping your weight under control is giving you fit for life!
  • Getting closer to an ideal weight for pregnant will not only make it easier to get pregnant,it will reduce complications.

Healthy Eating

Talk to your doctor about a healthy diet for a healthier baby.  I recommend eating organic whole foods if you can. Your body absorbs vitamins better from foods.  Here are some tips.

  • Dark, leafy greens have folic acid which helps prevent Spina bifidaa serious birth defect of the spinal cord.
  • Eat red, orange, and yellow fruits and vegetables.
  • Whole grain bread and grains.  A doctor can help you follow a gluten-free or vegan diet.
  • Meat, poultry, fish, eggs, and beans are recommended for protein.
  • Dairy, seafood, green vegetables, beans, and dried peas all have calcium in them. Calcium is important to fetal health.
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  • There are many breastfeeding resources to help you on your breastfeeding journey
  • Find qualified health professionals to help you. Your hospital should have resources to help you.
  • Local infant feeding team services, specialist breastfeeding services, International Board Certified Lactation Consultants (IBCLCs) and recognized breastfeeding counsellors for evidenced based support and information.
  • Ensure you have the right products to help you on you during breastfeeding.(pd link)
  • I encourage you Mama to focus on what is going well with the breastfeeding relationship and build on it. Keeping a positive attitude also helps.


Exercise

Be determined to stay fit!
  • Exercise will help manage your moods, help you to lose weight before pregnancy, and improve your circulation and blood pressure. High blood pressure and poor circulation can make it difficult for your baby to get nutrients from you.

Report Physical/Sexual/Emotional Abuse

Settling for violence is never the solution!
  • Abuse only makes things worse during or after pregnancy.
  • If you are in an abusive relationship, seek help while planning for a baby or early  in pregnancy. You have to think of your baby as well as yourself.
  • If you have a past history of abuse, seek counseling before pregnancy. Having a baby can sometimes trigger trauma, especially sexual abuse.(pd link)

Medication Benefits vs. Risks

  • You and your doctor will weigh the benefits versus the risks of taking medications during pregnancy, after birth, and during breastfeeding. (Also, I recommend you consult a lactation consultant in taking medications while breastfeeding.) I had to take psych medications with all of my pregnancies due to the severity of my illnesses.
  • Your baby doctor and your psychiatrist will help you make the medication changes to your medications that are safest for you and your baby.
  • Never STOP taking your medications without consulting your doctor. 20-50% of people with bipolar disorder who suddenly stop their medications during pregnancy will relapse within weeks.

Managing Chronic Mental Illness when breastfeeding

  • Having good control of your mental illnesses will help you to make good decisions in pregnancy. Work to stabilize your illness as much as possible beforehand.
  • Use the self-care techniques that help you stay mentally well.  
  • Try these  7 Coping Strategies That I Have Used.
  • Stay in close contact with your doctor.  Watch for signs of relapse.  You are at higher risk during pregnancy, birth, and postpartum for a relapse of symptoms.

Lifestyle Changes Before/During Pregnancy

  • Considering to quit smoking can be one of the best decisions you could ever make. Some benefits are preventing low birth weight, premature birth, and has been tied to ADHD. Talk with your doctor to get help quitting.
  • Illegal drugs are tied to all of the above. Seek help for substance abuse.
  • Alcohol can cause low birth weight, premature birth, and Fetal Alcohol Syndrome. Seek help to stop drinking.

Have fun with some of your favorite things

Being pregnant should not stop you from enjoying your favorite things. Continue to enjoy the things you like to do. Make your life exciting whether or not you are pregnant.

You can trust and depend on God

Yes you certainly can Mama! God cares. I have had many challenges during all of my pregnancies and I relied on God to get me through and He did.

Having the desire to depend on God practically is a God-honoring desire. Your desire is to glorify Him, and that desire itself honors God. Here are some ways ou can do it:

1Prayer: When we give God praise and thanks in prayer, we are demonstrating that we depend on Him. When we confess our sins, we are depending on His grace and forgiveness (Matthew 6:12–131 John 1:9. We also seek wisdom through prayer, thus depending on God to direct our path (James 1:5Proverbs 3:5–6).

2. Read, study, understand, and obey the Bible: The Bible is God’s Word and when we delve into it and respond to its truths, we are telling God we trust Him and take Him at His Word (2 Timothy 3:16–17). We are seeking to know Him and what He says so that we can depend on Him.

3.Act the right way : Jesus says that when we obey Him, we are showing our love for Him (1 John 5:2). We depend on Him by following His instructions.

4. Practice the “more of Him, less of me” principle: We are to offer ourselves as living sacrifices (Romans 12:1) and live as Christ. Paul also tells us in Romans to be spiritually minded rather than wanting things of the flesh (Romans 8:5–11).

5. Produce spiritual fruit: There is only one way to do this—stay connected with Jesus (John 15:4). Exhibiting the fruit of the Spirit (Galatians 5:22–23) is only possible when we are in touch with, and in tune with, the Holy Spirit and depend upon Him to work in and through us.

Develop the fruit s of the spirit is a must

6. Be thankful and filled with gratitude for all of your blessings. (psalms 103)

These are sobering times that we live in today.  Many people have lost jobs and can’t find one.  Others are underemployed and are just barely making it.  The unemployment rate is soaring, the stock market is highly volatile, and famine is spreading worldwide.  Families are losing their homes due to failed mortgages. 

There are severe droughts, floods, hurricanes, earthquakes, fires, and tornadoes.  And with turmoil going on in the world people are becoming desperate; even the people of God.  What can we do when our backs are against the wall and we have no where to turn and we are in serious trouble? As a pregnant woman, you have nothing to fear if you put your trust in the most high God.

God actually desires that we be utterly dependent upon Him and that we are in desperate need of His help.  Think of a human father.  What good father would not want his children to turn to him when they need help?  Naturally, a father loves it when his children come to him to seek help.  There is something special about having someone there for you.  God is this true source and He is more reliable than any human father or mother. He wants us to cast all of our cares on Him because He cares for us.(1 Peter 5:7).

Read more: https://www.whatchristianswanttoknow.com/call-on-god-for-help-in-desperate-times/#ixzz6fE9GOwHh

There is evidence that breastfeeding can have a preventative effect on mental illness developing. A large scale research study published in 2014 showed that mothers who planned to breastfeed and who actually went on to breastfeed were around 50% less likely to become depressed than mothers who had not planned to, and who did not, breastfeed. Mothers who planned to breastfeed but who did not go on to breastfeed were over twice as likely to become depressed as mothers who had not planned to, and who did not breastfeed.

Research also shows that more than 3 in 5 women stopped breastfeeding earlier than they wanted to. This shows the importance of providing good quality breastfeeding support and evidence based information on the safety of anti-depressant medication for mums who do want to breastfeed.

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Bottom Line:

Mental health is so important for mother and baby. The thing is if mom is fine mentally, so is baby. The benefits of breastfeeding are wonderful for all babies. It is important to discuss with your doctor the type of medication you are on. Most of the medications for mental illness is quite safe for breastfeeding moms. Developing healthy lifestyle habits i also essential. Ask your healthcare provider questions and keep all appointments. Manage your stressors. If you need support do not be afraid to ask. I wish you a happy healthy and safe breastfeeding.

Here is a video about coping with anxiety and depression during pregnancy. Learn as you enjoy!

Many new and expectant mothers are beaming with excitement and joy as they prepare to welcome their new bundle of joy into the world. It is common for some expectant mothers to experience high levels of anxiety and even become depressed before or after childbirth

Here is another one to help you

Jesus came that we may enjoy our lives

Breastfeeding and Dads: The Ultimate Guide For Dads


Dad & Baby! Amazing!

You may be wondering , how does breastfeeding affect dad? I believe it does have some effect on them.My husband I can happily say, he wanted me to invest in breastfeeding our children. Not many fathers are happy about having their partner breastfeed for various reasons. But lets ask the question…for real. Does breastfeeding benefit dads? Honestly I think there are many benefits.

It gives them an opportunity to help out with chores, focus on important matters to make the family better, take really special care of mom, build confidence knowing that mom is giving his baby the best nutrition ever. Some men admire how the breasts plump up so much during pregnancy and lactation. This helps to see their partners more sexier!

Moms Beware! Don’t Leave Dad Out

I had an experience where I found myself leaving my husband out of everything after our first child was born. I was so consumed in the baby. Mamas do not make the mistake I made. Keep those fathers involved. Even though they might not appear withdrawn, do all you can to keep you relationship in good condition.There are many ways I did this after the other kids were born.Here is a list of some of the things we didi:

  • Spent time talking after baby went to sleep
  • Took a break to spend time together while a relative watched baby
  • Spent time in prayer and reading the bible
  • Cooked his favorite meals
  • Surprised him with his favorite things. Just to see the smile on his face lit up my day.

There were times when I noticed that he looked a bit withdrawn and lonely. I would call him to come and help me out with baby. the father’s perspective, which is often an overlooked aspect of breastfeeding. Researchers agree that breastfeeding is good for babies and moms. Breastmilk likely protects babies from infections, makes them less likely to become overweight, and the bacteria in breastmilk builds the foundation of an infants’ gut microbiome — the ecosystem of microbes inside the digestive system that can help keep a person healthy throughout their life. Nursing has even been found to potentially protect mothers from some cancers and type 2 diabetes.
Babies win. Moms win. Guess what the research found? That most dads actually struggled while mothers breastfeed.

Many mothers feel they bond with their infants during their nine months of pregnancy in ways that dads just physically can’t. “What breastfeeding meant for a lot of dads was almost an extension of this exclusivity,” Sihota says — one that hinders their own chance to bond with their baby.

Breastfeeding Can Add Pressure To Dads Mental Health

Breastfeeding can take a toll on dads mental health!

Difficulty during breastfeeding, like an infant who won’t latch, can lead to even more troubles for dads. In conducting research on this subject, Francine deMontigny, a professor of nursing at the University of Quebec, found that breastfeeding problems can trickle into a marriage. Fathers are often left feeling helpless and inadequate. These insecurities, combined with the time and bodily commitments placed on their breastfeeding partners, can strain their relationships, and dad’s mental health.

Feelings of inadequacy and relationship challenges can exacerbate paternal postpartum depression, which afflicts more than ten percent of fathers, according to a large analysis. Another study found that the fathers of breastfed children had a lower quality of life than the fathers of bottle-fed children.

Breastfeeding Brings Partners Closer Together

Keep your partner close to you!

These problems are serious, Sihota says, but they don’t warrant giving up breastfeeding and picking up the bottle. For one thing, fathers’ experiences aren’t easy to pin down and there are ample studies showing breastfeeding in fact had a positive impact on dad’s life. In one study, Pakistani fathers said they felt breastfeeding brought them closer to their partners. Fathers in a different study easily found their role supporting the mother and infant during breastfeeding.

The difference between these two groups is perhaps one of finding motivation and purpose for dads. Even though mothers typically carry out the feeding, there are plenty of ways fathers can get involved and find their role in breastfeeding. They can pick up the household slack by taking charge of older children or chores, for example. Bringing a nursing mother water or the remote are small ways dads can support and make the mother comfortable while she nurses. Dads can read up about breastfeeding so that they are prepared to help troubleshoot when problems arise. There are psychological benefits to these chores: In one study, deMontigny found that fathers who took on these sorts of tasks adapted more easily to breastfeeding and felt more competent.

Dads Have A Lot To Offer

Dads have so much to offer!

But of course, bonding with baby is the big hole that dads with breastfeeding partners are trying to fill — and finding those opportunities is crucial. Fortunately, baby’s needs extend far beyond breastfeeding and dads can take on more of the other tasks, like burping and changing diapers, calming down at night, and, if moms are pumping, offering a bottle to give mom some space. Being close to baby, after all, isn’t just a psychological boost — it is part of the physiological transformation (dropping testosterone, a rise in oxytocin) that can set dads up for long-term success as a parent.

Give Fathers Time To Bond With Baby

Give dad the time he needs to bond!

Moms might help by stepping away more often to give fathers and infants alone time, deMonitigny said. Many of the men in her research were surrounded by women — their partners, mothers, and mothers-in-law — who told them how to pick up, hold, and interact with their babies. In response, some fathers withdrew. Giving dads the space to parent in their own way can give them a chance to bond, and it can be good for the baby. “The research has found that dads interact differently with a child, and that’s okay because it brings a different kind of stimulation, interaction, and information to the child, and the child benefits,” deMontigny said.

With little research and few resources to help new fathers during breastfeeding, there’s only so much families can do alone. “I think the responsibility is placed on the healthcare provider,” Sihota says, “When the mom and the dad are here and we are engaging in a conversation about infant nutrition, breastfeeding, bottle-feeding, et cetera, [we need to ask] how can we include dad?” That doesn’t mean dad can’t raise his hand and ask the same question.

How Dads Can Bond With Their Breastfed Baby

Sometimes dads worry that they’ll feel left out if their partner decides to breastfeed. But, taking care of a baby involves much more than just feeding. There are many other ways to care for and bond with your child. By spending time with your new baby, you can enjoy getting to know her while giving your wife a chance to rest. And, the more time you devote to your child, the more confident you will become in your parenting skills. Here are some ways dads can bond with a breastfed baby.

  • Holding: Pick your child up and talk to her while she’s awake and alert. At bedtime or naptime, you can rock her gently until she drifts off to sleep. When she’s sleeping, you can just sit and hold her in your arms.
  • Skin-to-Skin Contact: Direct skin-to-skin contact (kangaroo care) promotes a deep connection. When you place your newborn on your bare chest and snuggle together while your skin is touching, it stimulates the release of the hormone oxytocin. Oxytocin is responsible for love and bonding. It helps forge a close relationship between you and your child.
  • Providing Daily Infant Care: Before, during, and after breastfeeding, there will be plenty of diapers to change. Between switching breasts or after feedings, you can try to get a burp out of the baby. You can also be in charge of bath-time which may be enjoyable and soothing for both of you.
  • Having Some Fun: It’s good for you and your child to spend time playing together. When your child is a newborn or infant, you can get on the floor for a little tummy time, shake a rattle, try peek-a-boo, sing a song, or make some funny faces and noises. As your baby grows, playtime will become even more exciting.
  • Getting Out of the House: Put your baby in a sling, baby carrier, or stroller and go out for a walk. The fresh air and movement are calming, especially if the baby is fussy.

These are just some of the ways you can get involved with the care of your baby. As your baby grows, there will be so much more you will be able to do.

Fathers: Feeding Your Breastfed Baby

Das time for feeding baby will come

There will come a time when you as a father you will be able to feed your baby. Trust me that time will come in short order! Well it depends on your on your family situation. You might decide not to breastfeed. If you decide to breastfeed it would be best to wait until the breastmilk is well established which can take about 4 -6 months if mom is only breastfeeding. t some point, you’ll be able to feed your child, too. Depending on your family situation, it may be a few weeks after your child is born or after four to six months of exclusive breastfeeding; or 4-6 weeks.

  • Your wife may decide that she doesn’t want to breastfeed exclusively, so she may pump breast milk to give to the baby in a bottle or use infant formula for some feedings.
  • After a few weeks, your partner may have to return to work or spend time away from the baby on occasion. You may start bottle feeding at that time.
  • If you and your wife decide she will breastfeed exclusively for the first four to six months, then you’ll get to introduce his first solid foods when he’s ready.

It may seem like you’re being left out of feedings in the beginning, but it’s only for a short time and the time goes quickly. Before you know it, your child will be eating all sorts of things that you can help prepare and serve. I encourage you to stay involved and committed to this journey because it is worth it!

BOTTOM LINE:

Dad should be included in every aspect of pregnancy because his role is vital to the success of breastfeeding. If dad begins to withdraw from the relationship, this could mean the end of breastfeeding for Mom and baby. Difficulty with breastfeeding can result in dad adding pressure on Mom not to breastfeed because he is not apart of the experience. So moms please keep dad involved for the sake of you and baby. Its just too much to loose.

Thank you for stopping by. I hope you learned something. I encourage you to support and love one another. The postpartum period can be overwhelming, but God has given you the power to be courageous and strong. I wish you a happy, safe, and healthy breastfeeding with baby and dad. If you like, you can comment below. Please stop by again.

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Here is a great video I found for you to watch. Enjoy!

Dad, your new role is so important!