Absolute Problems To Avoid During Pregnancy: 7 Expert Tips To Keep You Safe


There are some things you should avoid during pregnancy

Hello Mamas and moms -to-be. I hope you are all doing great! Today we are going to learn about some problems you could avoid during your pregnancy. We all want our pregnancy to be a healthy, and happy one. Don’t we? There are seven things we are going to explain that can cause hazards to your pregnancy.

  1. Alcohol
  2. Cigarettes
  3. Drug abuse
  4. Marijuana
  5. Inhalants
  6. Caffeine
  7. Teratogenic agents

1. Alcohol

Because it is unknown whether any amount of alcohol is safe during pregnancy, it is safer not to drink than to take the risk.

During pregnancy, there is no such thing as a healthy level of alcohol.
According to the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) of Australia’s recommendations for mitigating health risks from alcohol intake, it’s best not to drink at all:

  • when you’re expecting
  • when you’re trying to get pregnant
  • while breastfeeding (because alcohol can pass into breast milk and affect a baby’s feeding and sleeping patterns)

The risk of low-level drinking to your unborn baby before you know you’re pregnant is unknown, but it could have an effect on the developing baby.

To help avoid any possible injury, you can stop drinking as soon as you find out you’re pregnant. Since stopping alcohol may be challenging for certain people, you may want to seek assistance from a healthcare professional. Alcohol is referred to as an alcoholic beverage.

Should I be concerned about my partner drinking?

According to studies, drinking alcohol on a daily basis lowers the production of sperm. This decreases the probability of a couple being pregnant. It is also thought that a man’s alcohol intake prior to conception could cause potential intellectual and physical development problems for the infant.

It is recommended that reducing the amount of alcohol you consume or eliminating it entirely will take about three months before conceiving.

What should I do If I was drinking before the pregnancy?

The risk of low-level drinking to your unborn baby before you know you’re pregnant is unknown, but it could have an effect on the developing baby.

To help avoid any possible injury, you should stop drinking as soon as you find out you’re pregnant. Since stopping alcohol may be challenging for certain people, you may want to seek assistance from a healthcare professional.

Remember the heavier the alcohol, the worse the effects

Heavy drinking, such as drinking every day or binge drinking, poses the greatest danger to your unborn child, but even one or two drinks a week will harm your unborn child.

Drinking while pregnant can be a risk for you.

Women who drink while pregnant can jeopardize their own health as a result of side effects like:

  • Dehydration
  • Vomiting
  • High blood pressure
  • Dietary deficiency
  • Gestational diabetes are all linked to high blood pressure.

Have you heard about FASD?

Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) is a condition in which a
The fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) is a set of physical, emotional, behavioral, and learning disorders that may result from fetal alcohol exposure.

Since there is currently no research on the amount of alcohol intake that causes FASD, it is recommended that alcohol be avoided during pregnancy as a preventative measure.

2. Smoking during pregnancy

Smoking – a pregnant woman who smokes raises her risks of miscarriage and stillbirth. Low birth weight, prematurity, and sudden unexpected death of infants are all risks that babies face (SUDI).(Sudden unexpected death of Infants).

3.Drug abuse

Since illicit drug use is a taboo subject, we don’t know anything about the effects of these drugs during pregnancy. Amphetamines, for example, have been linked to a higher risk of low birth weight, birth defects, and premature birth.
Cannabis use increases the risk of growth retardation, sleep disturbances, and behavioral issues.
Miscarriage, pre-term birth, and growth retardation are all dangers associated with cocaine use.

Addiction care medications
Controlled substances such as methadone and buprenorphine are referred to as pharmacotherapies. They’re used to support people who are addicted to heroin or opioids. Both of these therapies significantly minimize the risks to the fetus and pregnancy associated with heroin use. If you continue to use heroin or other narcotics, the effects of pharmacotherapy will be diminished.

4. Marijuana in pregnancy

Many women wonder if smoking marijuana during pregnancy can affect their baby. Several studies have shown that babies whose mothers smoke cannabis during pregnancy are more likely to have a low birth weight, which can lead to various health problems. Sadly, cannabis may also lead to an increased risk of stillbirth, whether used on its own, combined with tobacco, or alongside other illegal substances.

Studies also suggest that children who are exposed to cannabis in the womb (uterus) are more likely to suffer from attention deficit problems, hyperactivity disorders (ADHD) and difficulties with problem-solving when they’re older.

5. Substances used as drugs – such as inhalants (glues or aerosols).

There are many inhalants that women become addicted to before or during their pregnancy. Some women are not aware of how serious these chemicals can effect their pregnancy.

Inhalants are a complex group of chemicals that are commonly linked to opportunistic drug abuse in preteens, adolescents, and adults.

When these chemicals are used during pregnancy, they can penetrate the bloodstream of the fetus, causing miscarriage, premature birth, and damage to normal brain growth. According to the National Institute of Substance Addiction and Alcoholism, afflicted babies may develop a disorder known as “fetal solvent syndrome.” It has symptoms that are strikingly similar to fetal alcohol syndrome. It also rely on the placental barrier to transport carbon dioxide and other wastes to the maternal bloodstream, where they are eventually eliminated. Aside from toluene, other harmful liquid chemicals that may cause fetal solvent syndrome include benzene, petroleum ether, xylene, and methanol; all of these chemicals are often found in substances that inhalant users prefer.

6. Caffeine

This includes caffeine – tea, coffee and cola drinks. Many women question how safe is caffeine. Pregnant women can drink no more than 200 milligrams of caffeine a day, which is around one 11-ounce cup of coffee, according to the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG).

Foods with caffiene

The amount of caffeine in a cup of coffee depends on the type of bean, how it’s roasted, and how it’s brewed – and, of course, the size of the coffee cup. (Espresso has more caffeine per ounce, but it’s served in a small cup.) As a result, a full cup of brewed coffee contains more caffeine

You’ll need to be mindful of other sources of caffeine, such as tea, soft drinks, energy drinks, chocolate, and coffee ice cream, to balance your caffeine intake. Caffeine can also be used in herbal products and over-the-counter medications, such as headache, cold, and allergy medications. Pay attention to the labels. Read carefully.

Another thing to remember is that caffeine can be found in surprising ways. Some women use cocoa butter lotion to treat stretch marks, and it can contain a trace amount of caffeine. When mothers started using cocoa butter lotion during their deliveries, their babies with structural heart problems had a lower risk of fetal heart arrhythmias, according to a 2006 report.

The caffeine in the lotion seems to have some effect on babies during pregnancy, according to this report, but the exact mechanism is unclear. If you use a lot of cocoa butter lotion, talk to your doctor about how it could affect your total caffeine intake.

7. Teratogenic Drugs

Teratogenic drugs are medications that can cause cellular changes in human cells. Pregnant women are most vulnerable during the first trimester. Some of these drugs include the following:

Numerous drugs or drug groups may cause birth defects in a developing fetus, including:

  • ACE (angiotensin converting enzyme) inhibitors used to treat high blood pressure or congestive heart failure
  • angiotensin II antagonists, also used to treat high blood pressure or congestive heart failure
  • Isotretinoin (an acne drug)
  • alcohol
  • cocaine
  • high doses of vitamin A
  • lithium
  • male hormones
  • some antibiotics
  • some anticonvulsant medications
  • some cancer-fighting medications
  • some drugs that treat certain rheumatic conditions
  • some thyroid medications
  • Thalidomide
  • the blood-thinning drug warfarin
  • the hormone diethylstilbestrol (DES).

There could be more added to this list.

Bottom line

Ensuring that your baby is safe while pregnant is certainly a priority for all moms to be. I encourage you to do all you can to help your baby to be the healthiest ever. I also encourage you fathers and family members to support and encourage this woman who has just had a live human. Keep her calm through out the pregnancy: especially during the third trimester. Be aware of these substances that can affect your pregnancy. Thank you for stopping by today and please comment / like this post. Remember God loves you and has empowered you to be successful during your breastfeeding journey.


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Breastfeeding And Conscious Sedation


Great news! Medications used for the operating room is not harmful for breastfeeding mothers and their babies

Many breastfeeding mothers have intravenous sedation from time to time. The safety of these drugs need to be evaluated to ensure that mother, baby, and breast milk are safe.

Often times, discontinuing breastfeeding for a surgical or diagnostic procedure requiring sedation is the only alternative suggested to a nursing mother. Discontinuing breastfeeding is typically not necessary.

Today, many women, armed with knowledge and assertiveness, search for other ways or other practitioners who are willing to work with them as they have their procedure with sedation and continue nursing. They know that for most medications, very little of the drug is transferred to their milk. Additionally, very few medications have adverse effects in breastfed babies because the dose transferred to the milk is in such a low dose or it is poorly bioavailable to the infant.

The medications often used for sedation procedures in dental offices include:

  • Triazolam (Halcion)
  • Diazepam (Valium)
  • Nitrous Oxide
  • Phenergan
  • Decadron
  • Fentanyl
  • Versed
  • Propofol

Many medical professionals use these same or similar drugs for other surgical or diagnostic procedures requiring sedation.

Oral Agents

Triazolam and diazepam are used as oral pre-operative sedatives, often taken one hour prior to a procedure with a sip of water. If a patient is breastfeeding, the oral sedative of choice would be triazolam with a half life of 1.5-5.5 hours compared to diazepam’s half life of 43 hours. Some pediatric concerns of poor suckling, lethargy and sedation have been reported with Valium. The milk to plasma ratio with Valium has been reported to be as high as 2.8.

Inhalation Agents

The inhalation agent of choice in dentistry is nitrous oxide blended with oxygen, also know as “laughing gas”. A nitrous oxide/oxygen blend helps to reduce anxiety and works as a sedative. In the dental office, the patient breathes the gas through a nasal mask. Patients describe a sense of well being and relaxation. It works quickly and wears off quickly, making it a good choice for breastfeeding mothers and breastfed babies. Its half life is less than 3 minutes.

Agents Used for IV Sedation include:

Benzodiazepines

  • Diazepam (Valium)
  • Midazolam (Versed)

Narcotic Analgesics

  • Alfentanil (Alfenta)
  • Fentanyl (Sublimaze)
  • Hydromorphone (Dilaudid)
  • Morphine

Barbiturates

  • Methohexital (Brevital)
  • Thiopental (Pentothal)

Sedative/Hypnotics

  • Propofol (Diprivan)

Reversal Medication

  • Flumazenil (Romazicon)
  • Naloxone (Narcan)

IV sedation is a great alternative for breastfeeding mothers undergoing surgical or diagnostic procedures.  The IV medications listed above produce quick, effective sedation.  Recovery time from these sedative agents is also short.  The majority of patients tell us they were comfortable and do not remember much if anything about the procedure.

The  IV medications listed above have a very short half life and the milk to plasma ratio is low for most of these drugs, except Valium and Morphine.  The half lives of these drugs are quite long and the milk to plasma ratio is somewhat higher than the other drugs listed.  Some references suggest using caution with these drugs, and some do not. My advice is to use caution when using these drugs with the breastfeeding mother, or even better, chose a more appropriate alternative besides diazepam or morphine.

More guidelines

These medications often used for sedation procedures in dental offices include:

  • Triazolam (Halcion)
  • Diazepam (Valium)
  • Nitrous Oxide
  • Phenergan
  • Decadron
  • Fentanyl
  • Versed
  • Propofol

Many medical professionals use these same or similar drugs for other surgical or diagnostic procedures requiring sedation.

Oral Agents

Triazolam and diazepam are used as oral pre-operative sedatives, often taken one hour prior to a procedure with a sip of water. If a patient is breastfeeding, the oral sedative of choice would be triazolam with a half life of 1.5-5.5 hours compared to diazepam’s half life of 43 hours. Some pediatric concerns of poor suckling, lethargy and sedation have been reported with Valium. The milk to plasma ratio with Valium has been reported to be as high as 2.8.

Inhalation Agents

The inhalation agent of choice in dentistry is nitrous oxide blended with oxygen, also know as “laughing gas”. A nitrous oxide/oxygen blend helps to reduce anxiety and works as a sedative. In the dental office, the patient breathes the gas through a nasal mask. Patients describe a sense of well being and relaxation. It works quickly and wears off quickly, making it a good choice for breastfeeding mothers and breastfed babies. Its half life is less than 3 minutes.

Agents Used for IV Sedation include:

Benzodiazepines

  • Diazepam (Valium)
  • Midazolam (Versed)

Narcotic Analgesics

  • Alfentanil (Alfenta)
  • Fentanyl (Sublimaze)
  • Hydromorphone (Dilaudid)
  • Morphine

Barbiturates

  • Methohexital (Brevital)
  • Thiopental (Pentothal)

Sedative/Hypnotics

  • Propofol (Diprivan)

Reversal Medication

  • Flumazenil (Romazicon)
  • Naloxone (Narcan)

IV sedation is a great alternative for breastfeeding mothers undergoing surgical or diagnostic procedures.  The IV medications listed above produce quick, effective sedation.  Recovery time from these sedative agents is also short.  The majority of patients tell us they were comfortable and do not remember much if anything about the procedure.

The  IV medications listed above have a very short half life and the milk to plasma ratio is low for most of these drugs, except Valium and Morphine.  The half lives of these drugs are quite long and the milk to plasma ratio is somewhat higher than the other drugs listed.  Some references suggest using caution with these drugs, and some do not. My advice is to use caution when using these drugs with the breastfeeding mother, or even better, chose a more appropriate alternative besides diazepam or morphine.

Bottom line

There is great news Mamas! It is important for the health care professional to inform the mother of the risks and benefits, possibilities and options given the evidence available about the safety of breastfeeding and using the medications discussed in this article.  It is not appropriate for health care professionals to advise ALL mothers to discontinue breastfeeding or to “pump and dump” for surgical or diagnostic procedures requiring oral, inhalation or intravenous sedation because most medications used for oral, inhalation and IV sedation are compatible with breastfeeding.  They have no effect on milk supply and very minimal or no effect on the infant.

With breastfeeding mothers, the health care professional should consider avoiding diazepam and morphine as sedative agents for a surgical or diagnostic procedure because of their long half life and higher milk to plasma ratio.  Alternative medications that do not impact the breastfeeding relationship are readily available for sedation for surgical and diagnostic procedures.

Thank you for stopping by today. I hope you enjoyed this post. It is not a very common topic, but I think you need to know how safe it is for you, your breast milk and your baby. If you have any comments feel free to comment. I wish you a successful breastfeeding journey Mama and I encourage you dad to support Mama as much as possible. May God bless you all. Please like and join in the fun of following!

Breastfeeding And Prescription Drugs To Increase Milk Supply


When all other methods have failed for increasing your milk supply, prescription drugs can help

Hello Mommies! I hope you are all doing well. Oh I should not leave out the great dads who may be reading this. I hope you are fine too. We are going to discuss the prescription drugs used to increase breast milk supply. These drugs are usually recommended if all other methods have failed due to low milk supply, or if some women want to relactate a baby that was weaned. In some cases, a woman might want to breastfeed an adopted baby.

Did you know that these medications cause an increase in the level of prolactin, the hormone responsible for milk production, so they have the side effect of making breast milk.1 Under the direct supervision and monitoring of a doctor, these medications have been prescribed to help create, re-establish or increase the supply of breast milk for nursing mothers.

Our Amazing Bodies Can do It

Thanks to God, it is possible for non-pregnant women to lactate. Historically, the motivation for women who have not just given birth to lactate has been to feed an infant whose mother died or was unable to breastfeed. More recently, women who adopt infants and want to breastfeed them are also seeking ways to induce lactation. And of course, some couples who find breastfeeding erotically exciting are exploring these strategies as well. The most successful cases of women who haven’t just given birth lactating usually include a combination of hormone therapy and physical stimulation of the breasts and nipples.

Lets look at what happens during pregnancy

During pregnancy, elevated levels of the hormones estrogen, progesterone, and prolactin prepare the breasts for milk production. After delivery, there is a dramatic decline in estrogen and progesterone, but prolactin levels remain high and initiate the onset of lactation. Women who aren’t pregnant but who wish to lactate can take a daily regimen of hormones to mimic these processes that occur during pregnancy. Typically, hormone therapy is discontinued shortly before breast-feeding begins. At that point, the baby’s suckling is thought to stimulate and maintain milk production.

Maintaining milk flow

Regular stimulation of the breasts and nipples can also help to produce and maintain milk flow. Some experts suggest pumping both breasts with a hospital-grade electric breast pump every three hours, beginning about two months before you hope to begin breast-feeding. You can also manually stimulate the breasts and nipples (this is where partner participation may come in handy).

Breast stimulation can encourage the production and release of prolactin. A qualified lactation consultant(link is external) may provide you with specific techniques for stimulation and hormone therapy. You could also contact a local hospital or clinic to see if they have lactation consultants on staff, or visit your primary health care provider for a consultation.

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The most common prescribed galactagologues

1. Domperidone (Motilium)

  • Domperidone, is used to treat gastric problems.4 It’s not available in the United States but is commonly used in Canada and other countries to stimulate the production of breast milk.
  • Outside of the U.S., domperidone is believed to be safer than metoclopramide, with fewer side effects for nursing mothers. It’s also considered to be safe to take long-term. Side effects such as headache, stomach cramps, and dry mouth can occur but tend to be uncommon.
  • In the United States, the FDA has not approved domperidone for any condition.5 It warns against the use of this drug for anyone, especially breastfeeding women.
  • Reports of serious heart problems and sudden death have been associated with the intravenous (IV) use of this medication, so the FDA has deemed it unsafe.6 Therefore, in the US, it is illegal to import, sell or compound domperidone except for specific patients with severe stomach issues, and only after a doctor submits a special request to the FDA.

2.Metoclopramide (Reglan)

  • Metoclopramide is a medication used to treat stomach issues such as reflux, nausea, and vomiting.3 It is the most commonly used medication for lactation induction and increasing a low supply of breast milk in the United States.
  • Results can usually be seen in a few days, and will typically last as long as the medication is continued. The supply often dwindles again once the medication is no longer being taken.
  • Metoclopramide does travel to the baby through breast milk, but it hasn’t been shown to cause any problems in breastfed infants.
  • The common side effects of metoclopramide are sleepiness, headache, or restlessness.3 Less common, but more severe side effects have also been reported with the use of this medication.
  • The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) warns that depression and tardive dyskinesia, a condition that causes tics, tremors or uncontrollable movements of the face and body, could result from taking metoclopramide in high doses over an extended period of time.3 In some cases, the involuntary movements do not resolve even after the medication is stopped.
  • Metoclopramide should not be taken for longer than 12 weeks, and should not be used by anyone who suffers from depression, a seizure disorder, asthma or high blood pressure.

Other Medications- Not Recommended due to Risks Vs Benefits

Tranquilizers such as chlorpromazine (Thorazine) and haloperidol (Haldol), and the blood pressure medication methyldopa (Aldomet) are some of the other prescriptions that can increase the level of prolactin in the body and potentially increase the supply of breast milk.7 However, side effects of these drugs can be very dangerous. The risks these medications pose to nursing mothers outweigh the benefits, so they are not used to enhance the milk supply.

What if I need to lactate but do not wish to take these drugs?

If hormone therapy or breast stimulation treatments are not the ways you’d like to go, you can check out a feeding aide that delivers formula or milk through a device that attaches to your breast (supplementary aid). For an erotic alternative, you could also drizzle milk on your breasts and invite your partner to imbibe that way.

Bottom line

Prescribed medications sometimes are necessary in the need for increased milk supply. Healthcare providers must be aware of the risks involved before prescribing. When these drugs are used for the right reasons, they can bring joy to the lives of many families. I hope you learned something to help you if you fall into one of the categories above. Please like, or comment on this post if you like. Thanks for stopping by and I wish you all the best in your breastfeeding goals.

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