Your Frequently Asked Questions About Antenatal Care:23 Most Burning Questions Answered!


Once pregnancy is confirmed, the next chapter for a pregnant woman is antenatal care attendance. I count it a privilege to work with pregnant families. Guiding and managing risks in a timely manner is so rewarding.

Pregnancy, Pregnancy, pregnancy! What a word. The beginning of a new life inside you, growing and changing you both emotionally and physically. It is very exciting to know that a little you is on the inside and you hope to meet someday. It is really amazing how many of us go through so many challenges with pregnancy, and despite it all, we have more babies! Huh pretty weird!

Once pregnancy is confirmed, the next chapter for a pregnant woman is antenatal care attendance. I count it a privilege to work with pregnant families. Guiding and managing risks in a timely manner is so rewarding. (Promotional link).

As pregnancy ends there is the start of new life. Antenatal consideration assumes a significant part to accomplish a fruitful labor and delivery. Standard antenatal classes help in the physical and mental arrangement of ladies and assist them with loosening up those last months. Antenatal consideration guarantees maternal fetal wellbeing prosperity and furthermore prepares and empowers women mentally and physically for labor and delivery.

Normal visits to the specialist during pregnancy are meant to guarantee that the soundness of the pregnant ladies and the developing hatchling is very much kept up. At the point when all stays well and appropriate consideration is taken, hence there is the possibility of a low risk pregnancy.

1. What is antenatal care and why are antenatal visits necessary?


Antenatal care is the consideration you receive from experts during your pregnancy. It’s occasionally called pregnancy care or maternity care. You’ll be offered meetings with a birthing specialist, or at times a specialist who spends significant time in pregnancy and birth (an obstetrician).Antenatal visits are necessary to evaluate health risks for mother and baby, and provide early detection and treatment if
problems exist.

2. What are the aims of antenatal care?

  1. A full history must be taken.
  2. A full physical examination must be done.
  3. The duration of pregnancy must be established.
  4. Important screening tests must be done.
  5. Some high-risk patients can be identified.

3. When should I start my antenatal care visits?

It is vital that all pregnant women receive antenatal care as soon as possible. The earlier helps the healthcare provider time to manage risks.

4.What would my first visit be about and what should I bring for my visit?


This visit is typically the patient’s first contact with clinical benefits during her pregnancy. She should be treated with graciousness and comprehension to acquire her certainty and to guarantee her future co-activity and customary participation. This chance should be taken to book the patient for antenatal mind and consequently guarantee the early identification and the executives of treatable risks.

You will need a valid passport, driver’s license, or voter registration card, and your immunization record. I also tell my clients to carry a little snak and eat a good breakfast; especially if you will be going with the public registration. At the public registration there is usually a lonerg wait thana private attendance

5.What histories will be needed?


A full history, containing the following:

  1. The past obstetric history.
  2. The present obstetric history.
  3. A medical history.
  4. HIV status.
  5. History of medication and allergies.
  6. A surgical history.
  7. A family history.
  8. The social circumstances of the patient.

6. Can fathers attend?


Fathers are so valuable for the journey!

Certainly!. If fathers played a vital role in the pregnancy, they should be a part of the care. Mothers to be need dad’s support all the way. It also gives dad the opportunity to connect with mom and baby.

7.Is family planning information given?


Yes. Contraception is extremely important during pregnancy. It is something that you know exactly which method you want to go on after having baby in hospital or at your home birth. There are many methods to chose from. They all have side effects, but you have the option to choose the one you are most comfortable about.

8.What if I miss an appointment?


Request another one as soon as possible. Try to attend as many as possible.

9. Are there additional classes and information sessions offered?


Yes. Childbirth and Breastfeeding classes are usually offered, but some places also offer classes for siblings, grandparents, or CPR. Find out what and when they are available for you.

10.What are some minor discomforts associated with pregnancy?


· Morning sickness/heartburn/nausea
· Constipation
· Backache
· Varicose veins
· Swelling
· Faintness
· Insomnia
· Depression11. What are some things to avoid during pregnancy?
· Alcohol
· Cigarette smoke
· Toxic fumes
· Auto accidents
· Excess caffeine

11. What are some warning signs that should be reported immediately?


· Sudden swelling
· Bleeding
· Leaking or gushing fluids
· Fever
· Pain, burning on urination
· Premature labor

Bleeding any time in pregnancy calls for urgent intervention

12. What are the signs of premature labor?


· Regular contractions not relieved by rest
· Pelvic pressure that feels like the baby is pushing down
· Abdominal cramps with or without diarrhea
· Blood or watery liquid leaking from the vagina
· Low, dull backache

13.What are some of the risk factors associated with pre-term labor/delivery?


Pretermed pregnancy being very common, is something that you should be aware of. Knowing the signs and symptoms is key to saving your pregnancy outcome. Any history of preterm labor/delivery or previous low infant birth-weight in previous pregnancies should be included in your report to your healthcare provider. Here are some things that put you at risk:
· Multiple pregnancy (for example, twins or triplets)
· Maternal age (less than 17 or over 35 yrs)
· Black race
· Folic acid deficiency
· 3+ spontaneous terminations
· Uterine abnormalities
· Infections
· Bleeding
· Anemia
· Obesity
· Drug or alcohol abuse

14. What should you do if your water broke?


If your water broke and you are not at term you should go to your healthcare facility or contact your provider. Once the water broke, your baby is are at risk for infection. The water bag or amniotic membrane protects your baby from harmful germs that could cause respiratory and blood infections. (Promotional link).

15. Are pregnancy classes necessary?

Childbirth classes are so essential for you and dad!


Absolutely yes! Pregnancy classes are necessary whether you do it online or in person. Studies have proven that childbirth classes gives parents the confidence they need to get over the fear of labor and delivery. massage, relaxation, breathing techniques, and medications.

Labor classes help assemble your trust in your body’s capacity to conceive an offspring.

  • You can examine your feelings about labor and birth with the educator and different couples with similar concerns.
  • Your accomplice will find out about labor and how to help you on the huge day. You may find that going to labor classes together will make an extraordinary bond.
  • Your educator will talk about relief from discomfort alternatives, including rub, unwinding, breathing methods, and drugs.
  • A visit through your birthing place during class will offer you the chance to see the staff in real life. This is an extraordinary chance to get some information about routine practices, like electronic fetal checking and opportunity of development during work.
  • In the event that you are arranging a medical clinic birth, you may be keen on taking more than one class. A class at the medical clinic may incorporate an essential outline of work and birth and may train explicit emergency clinic rehearses.
  • Classes instructed outside the medical clinic may provide you with top to bottom information about coping with labor and delivery.

16. How long is the wait?

The wait varies with whether you go to a private or public clinic. The private clinic is usually faster while the public timing is longer. The choice is up to you.

17. What do I need to bring to the clinic?

On the initial visit, you will need the child’s birth certificate. It is important to take along the
child’s immunization card at all subsequent visits

18. When will I get my pap smear results?


In approximately 3 weeks if you are attending a public clinic and sometimes faster from a private clinic.

19. Is a pap smear painful?


No but some women may find it uncomfortable.

20. How should I prepare for this visit?

You should take something to eat if you are going to a public clinic because they usually take longer because of the amount of patients to be seen.
Mothers should give clear, honest information to have the best outcomes; to ensure continued health and well being of mother and baby. Hiding information will do more harm than good.


.

21.What should I do if my baby’s movement has decreased?

If your baby’s movement decreases, you should seek medical attention. Your baby may reduce movement during the last few weeks due to space in the womb. Some practitioners give you a kick chart to record your baby’s movement after 28 weeks. ( Promotional link).

22. What are warning signs that should be reported immediately?

  • · Fever – 38 degrees C/100.4 degrees F or above
  • · Increased pain in the abdomen or caesarean section incision
  • · Swelling or discharge from the C-section/episiotomy
  • · Passing plum-sized clots
  • · Cracked, bleeding nipples
  • · Tender, reddened breasts
  • · Burning during urination
  • Vagina l bleeding
  • Vaginal discharge that is creamy or yellow

23. How many scans will I need and will it hurt?

A ultrasound examine sends frequency sound waves to the uterus during pregnancy to capture the picture of the growing baby. Pictures in ultrasound filters uncover the growth periods of the body, frequently uncovering bones and tissues through shades of white and grey. You will need 2 scans with a normal pregnancy.  It is safe, and forms an essential part of ensuring your baby is developing well in the womb. One at 18 -20 weeks and if necessary earlier or later in the pregnancy. Having an ultrasound scan can determine if your baby is male or female and does not hurt, but you may find the gel used cold. Scans are generally safe for babies.

Proverbs 3:5-6
King James Version
5 Trust in the Lord with all thine heart; and lean not unto thine own understanding.

6 In all thy ways acknowledge him, and he shall direct thy paths.

Bottom line

Antenatal care, no doubt is vital for all pregnant women. Many things can go wrong during pregnancy; therefore, regular attendance is necessary. Antenatal care additionally helps you to bond with your baby and helps you to bond with your unborn baby. It provides you the opportunity to speak and connect with your healthcare provider. I want you to trust in the Lord to help you out in all things. I hope you have a wonderful experience. Thank you for visiting today and do come again. Feel free to like or comment below and share us. You may also connect with me at:

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Baby Fever: 10 Steps to Giving the Best Care to Your Little Star!


Never keep your little star overheating with a fever! Take off the extra clothing and keep her cool

No parent likes to hear that their child has a fever. I remember when my kids used to be with fever, it was not a happy time in the home. Something was not right with them and the fever is always a good indicator of that. It’s critical to learn how to console a feverish baby and to know when medical help is needed. Fevers aren’t harmful in and of themselves, however the underlying cause can be the culprit. Fever in young babies is more likely to be caused by something that needs to be treated than in older children.(paid link). This site contains affiliate links . As an associate I earn a small commission if you make any purchase through my links. Thank you for your consideration.

Reasons why children get fevers

Fevers are usually a symptom of a more serious medical problem.

Fever can strike your baby for a variety of reasons, including:

an infection caused by a virus
an infection caused by bacteria
a medical disorder caused by such vaccines
Fevers in children are commonly caused by respiratory illnesses such as colds and ear infections.

Here are some tips to empower you to helping your little star along:

1. Keep a thermometer on hand always!

Although you might be able to detect a temperature difference just by touching it, this is not a reliable way to diagnose a fever. Take your baby’s temperature with a thermometer if you think he or she has a fever.

A fever is described as a rectal temperature of more than 100.4°F (38°C). A fever is usually an indication that your baby’s body is battling an infection. A fever can trigger some of the body’s protective mechanisms to defend against invading viruses and bacteria. While a fever is a good way to combat infection, it can also make your baby miserable. You may also note that they are breathing more quickly.

A fever can cause a variety of symptoms:

If your baby isn’t drinking enough or is vomiting due to their illness, dehydration will occur. Young children will easily become fatigued. Dehydration can cause the following symptoms:

  • crying without shedding tears
  • fewer wet diapers due to dry mouth
  • It’s fine to wait to see if your baby’s fever goes away on its own until he or she is uncomfortable and isn’t sleeping, eating, or playing normally.

2. Recognize that it is a fever

The average temperature is about 98.6 degrees Fahrenheit (37 degrees Celsius). From morning to evening, the temperature can differ slightly. When you you wake up, your body temperature is lower, and it rises in the afternoon and evening.

Fever in infants under the age of three months necessitates urgent medical care to determine the root cause and, if possible, treat it. (Paid link)

Fever is diagnosed in infants when their temperature is:

When taken rectally, 100.4°F (38°C) or higher 99°F (37.2°C) or higher when taken by other methods

For children older than 3 months, low-grade fevers don’t necessarily necessitate a trip to the hospital.

3. Learn how to lower the temperature

Learning how to check your baby’s temperature is empowering for you Mama!

A slightly elevated temperature in a child over the age of three months does not necessitate a trip to the hospital. The following methods can help you treat your fever at home:

Acetaminophen (Acetaminophen) is a pain reliever that if your child is older than three months, you should give him or her a small dose of children’s acetaminophen (Tylenol).

Doses are normally calculated based on body weight. If your baby hasn’t been weighed recently, your doctor may advise you to do so. You do not need to give your baby any medicine if their fever isn’t making them tired or fussy. Medication will make your child feel better momentarily if they have a high fever or other symptoms that are making them uncomfortable.

4. Fix their clothing: Keep em cool!


To keep your baby warm and cool, dress them in light clothing and use only a sheet or light blanket.

Overdressing your child can interfere with their body’s natural cooling mechanisms.Lower the thermostat.


5. Keep the room temperature cool!

Maintain a cool environment in your home and in your baby’s bed. This will help them from overheating.Bathe them in tepid -slightly warm water.

6. Bathe baby in lukewarm water

Keeping a cold environment during a fever could help reduce a fever!

Using lukewarm water, sponge your baby down. Never use hot water. You can do an elbow test and if it is comfortable for you, it should be comfortable for baby. To ensure water protection, keep an eye on your child when bathing.
Avoid using cold water because it will cause them to shiver, which will raise their temperature. Following the wash, quickly dry your baby and cover them in light clothes.

7. Offer fluids

Dehydration is a possible complication of fever. Offer regular fluids (breast milk or formula) and make sure your baby has tears when crying, a moist mouth, and regular wet diapers.

Call your doctor’s office to discuss ways to keep your child hydrated if this is a concern.

8.The don’ts when your baby has s fever!

There are several things you should not do if your infant has a fever:

  • Do not delay medical attention for a newborn with any fever or an infant with a persistent fever or who seems very ill. High fevers can cause siezures in children
  • Do not administer medication to your infant without first checking their temperature and consulting your doctor’s office.
  • Do not use medication intended for adults.
  • Do not overdress your infant.
  • Do not use ice or rubbing alcohol to lower your infant’s temperature.

9. Learn how to read a thermometer

Using a digital multiuse thermometer rectally to get the most precise temperature. Rectal temperatures would be higher than temperatures obtained by other methods.

Here’s how to rectally take your baby’s temperature:

  • First, read the manufacturer’s instructions and set the temperature to Fahrenheit or Celsius (in order to report the temperature correctly).
  • First, read the manufacturer’s instructions and set the temperature to Fahrenheit or Celsius (in order to report the temperature correctly).
    Use rubbing alcohol or soap to clean the thermometer.
    Apply petroleum jelly or another healthy lubricant to the thermometer’s end.
    Your infant’s bottom should be free of any clothes or diapers.
  • When you take your baby’s temperature, gently hold him or her in place. To stop the thermometer going deeper towards your infant’s rectum, don’t let them move or wiggle during the procedure. To avoid harm, it is safest to enlist someone’s assistance in keeping the child still.
    Switch on the thermometer and place it in your infant’s rectum for a half-inch to one-inch before it beeps. (Most thermometers have this feature.)
  • If you use other devices according to their instructions, they can give you accurate temperature readings for your baby.
  • Temporal artery thermometers take the temperature from the forehead and do not operate on babies under the age of three months. This age group of infants should have their rectal temperature taken.
  • Tympanic thermometers are used to take the temperature of a baby’s ear and should only be used for that purpose.
  • Designate your digital multiuse thermometer for rectal use only and label it to avoid confusion.
  • Avoid taking your infant’s temperature orally or under the armpit. These aren’t considered accurate for infants and young children.
  • Don’t conclude that your infant has a fever if you feel warmth by touching their forehead. You need an accurate digital thermometer reading to determine fever.
  • Avoid using mercury-filled thermometers. They pose a risk of mercury exposure if they break.

10. Know when to get professional help

Never delay medical help when needed!

Make sure to monitor your infant’s temperature during the course of an illness and observe other symptoms and behaviors to determine whether you should contact your doctor. ( Paid link here).

You should contact your infant’s doctor or seek medical treatment if:

  • they have a fever that has lasted longer than 24 hours or that occurs regularly
  • they’re irritable (very fussy) or lethargic (weak or more sleepy than usual)
  • your infant’s temperature doesn’t lower within an hour or so after taking an appropriate dose of medication
  • they develop other symptoms like a rash, poor feeding, or vomiting
  • they’re dehydrated (not producing tears, spit, or the usual amount of wet diapers).

  • your infant under 3 months old develops any elevation in temperature
  • your infant between 3–6 months old has a rectal temperature of 102°F (38.9°C) or higher
  • your 6- to 24-month-old has a fever above 102°F (38.9°C) for more than a day or two with no other symptoms

Bottom line

Treatment for a fever in an infant varies depending on the child’s age and the symptoms associated with the fever.

When a newborn develops a fever, he or she should see a doctor right away, while older babies may be treated at home if the fever is mild.

Always consult your doctor before administering any medicine to your baby, and take your child to the doctor if he or she develops a high fever or if the fever persists lasting loner than a day or two.


Thank you for stopping by today. I sure hope you enjoyed this post. If you are a dad-to-be reading this I want to encourage you to take good care of your pregnant mother-to-be. She deserves it. Mama I want you to know that God is for you and with you. You are not alone talk to Him anytime. Please like,comment, share and do come again.

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How to Successfully Breastfeed And Pump for your Baby: Making Life Easier


Did you know breast-feeding is based on supply and demand. The more you breast-feed your baby — or pump while you’re away from your baby — the more milk your breasts will produce. Are you ready to start a breastfeeding and pumping schedule, but you’re not quite sure where or how to plan a routine that will work for the many different scenarios you have whirling around in your head?

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Here are some tips to help you breastfeed and pump effectively:

Believe in yourself: You can do it

A positive mindset and determination for breastfeeding can do wonders for you. If you can believe it, you can achieve it. Thinking good about breastfeeding can be beneficial for you and your baby. Babies will know if you do not want to breastfeed or not. They will sense it right away. Hence, a good mindset is necessary for good success. Determination is being willing to try everything you need to get success.

Always look out for number one

Eat a healthy diet, including plenty of fruits, vegetables and whole grains. Include physical activity in your daily routine. Sleep when the baby sleeps — and don’t be afraid to ask for help when you need it.

Also consider your birth control options. Breast-feeding itself isn’t a reliable form of birth control, and birth control pills that contain estrogen can interfere with milk production. While you’re breast-feeding, you might want to use condoms or other forms of birth control.

Breast-feeding is a commitment, and your efforts to maintain your milk supply are commendable. If you’re having trouble maintaining your milk supply or you’re concerned that you’re not producing enough milk, ask your doctor or lactation consultant for other suggestions.

 Avoid smoking

Smoking can reduce your milk supply, as well as change the taste of your milk and interfere with your baby’s sleep.

Secondhand smoke also is a concern. Secondhand smoke increases the risk of sudden infant death syndrome and respiratory illnesses. If you smoke, ask your doctor for options to help you quit. In the meantime, avoid smoking just before or during a feeding.

Limit alcohol

Not drinking alcohol is the safest option for breastfeeding mothers. Generally, moderate alcohol consumption by a breastfeeding mother (up to 1 standard drink per day) is not known to be harmful to the infant, especially if the mother waits at least 2 hours after a single drink before nursing. However, exposure to alcohol above moderate levels through breast milk could be damaging to an infant’s development, growth, and sleep patterns. Alcohol consumption above moderate levels may also impair a mother’s judgment and ability to safely care for her child.

Drink lots of fluids

Water, juice and milk can help you stay hydrated. Limit soda, coffee and other caffeinated drinks, though. Too much caffeine might lead to irritability or interfere with your baby’s sleep. If you choose to have an occasional alcoholic drink, avoid breast-feeding for two hours afterward.

Relax and be happy

Sleep / rest when baby sleeps

Stress can hinder your body’s natural ability to release breast milk. Find a quiet place to pump. It might help to massage your breasts or use warm compresses. You might want to think about your baby, look at a picture of your baby or listen to relaxing music.

Pump often and effectively

The more you pump, the more milk you’ll produce. If you’re working full time, try to pump for 15 minutes every few hours during the workday. If you can, pump both breasts simultaneously. A double breast pump helps stimulate milk production while reducing pumping time by half. Gently pressing on your breasts while pumping may help empty them.

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When you’re with your baby, breast-feed on demand: skin to skin

The more you breast-feed your baby when you’re together, the more milk you’ll produce when you pump. Depending on your schedule, try more-frequent evening, early morning or weekend feedings. If you have a predictable schedule, you might ask your baby’s caregivers to avoid feeding your baby during the last hour of care — so that you can breast-feed your baby as soon as you arrive.

Also practice skin to skin to keep baby interested. You can practice lying down or standing up. You can practice baby led feeding by lying down and allowing baby to lie down for a perfect latch.

Avoid or limit formula feedings

Formula feedings will reduce your baby’s demand for breast milk, which will lower your milk production. To maintain your milk supply, it’s important to pump anytime your baby has a feeding of formula or expressed breast milk.

Remember, the more you breast-feed your baby or pump while you’re apart, the more milk you’ll produce. You might also pump extra milk — either after or between breast-feeding sessions — and freeze it for future use.

Be aware of your baby’s growth spurts

All babies have growth spurts that occurs between 2 weeks and three months. During this time you will notice that your little star is very fussy. This is shown by constant crying , and irritability. Many mothers are easily persuaded to give up breastfeeding or compliment feedings with formula. This does not have to happen. New moms you can breastfeed when baby is constantly crying and fussy. You can breastfeed on demand. This will allow you to produce more milk as your breasts are stimulated by your little star. More breastfeeding equals more milk.

How often should I pump?

If you want to be successful in your breastfeeding and pumping journey, you must make pumping after breastfeeding a priority. You should aim to pump 8 -12 times per day. If this is too much for you, you could try just doing the best you can. That is what God requires of us – our best.

Bottom line

Breastfeeding and pumping can really raise your breastfeeding increases. If you are going to pump effectively, there are many things you can do. One of the first is believing in yourself; that you can breastfeed and pump effectively. Very ew people get anything done if they do not believe. Taking good care of yourself is another good thing you can do. Avoid smoking and limiting the use of alcohol is paramount in succeeding in your pumping sessions. Do not forget to also drink lots of fluids to stay hydrated. Breast Fed Is Best will receive commissions from paid links at no extra cost to you.

Pumping often and realizing that growth spurts can be used as a tool to further increase your milk supply. Most of all make breastfeeding and pumping a smart way to love your baby more. Thank you or stopping by today and do come again. I hope your breastfeeding journey is going great. Please like and give a comment below. I would really appreciate it.


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Breastfeeding And Your Newborn: How To Cope With The First Weeks


Breastfeeding can be very challenging during the first few weeks, but planning can make a difference

Frequent nursing encourages good milk supply and reduces engorgement. Aim for nursing at least  8– 12 times per day (24 hours). You CAN’T nurse too often–you CAN nurse too little. Remember the more you nurse the more milk

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Nurse at the first signs of hunger (stirring, rooting, hands in mouth)–don’t wait until baby is crying. Allow baby unlimited time at the breast when sucking actively, then offer the second breast. Some newborns are excessively sleepy at first–wake baby to nurse if 2 hours (during the day) or 4 hours (at night) have passed without nursing.

Breast changes

Your milk should start to “come in” (increase in quantity and change from colostrum to mature milk) between days 2 and 5. To minimize engorgement: nurse often, don’t skip feedings (even at night), ensure good latch/positioning, and let baby finish the first breast before offering the other side. To decrease discomfort from engorgement, use cold and/or cabbage leaf compresses between feedings. If baby is having trouble latching due to engorgement, use reverse pressure softening or express milk until the nipple is soft, then try latching again. Breastfeed every 2-3 hours and pump immediately afterwards. Always keep in mind the more you breastfeed the more milk you make.

How often should baby be nursing?

After giving birth life can seem pretty bewildering – you’re getting to know your newborn while recovering from the delivery. Your emotions might be all over the place (especially between days two and five when many women get the double whammy of their milk ‘coming in’1 and the ‘baby blues’.2 Plus, there’s often expectation – and pressure – to be up and about quickly and generally be a supermom. But one of the most super things you can do this week is just be with your baby and get breastfeeding on track. Some newborns are excessively sleepy—wake baby to nurse if 2 hours (during the day) or 4 hours (at night) have passed without nursing. Once baby has established a good weight gain pattern, you can stop waking baby and nurse on baby’s cues alone.

Is baby getting enough milk?

See your healthcare provider for any weight loss issues you may have

Weight gain: Normal newborns may lose up to 7% of birth weight in the first few days. After mom’s milk comes in, the average breastfed baby gains 6 oz/week (170 g/week). Take baby for a weight check at the end of the first week or beginning of the second week. Consult with baby’s doctor and your lactation consultant if baby is not gaining as expected.

Dirty diapers: In the early days, baby typically has one dirty diaper for each day of life (1 on day one, 2 on day two…). After day 4, stools should be yellow and baby should have at least 3-4 stools daily that are the size of a US quarter (2.5 cm) or larger. Some babies stool every time they nurse, or even more often–this is normal, too. The normal stool of a breastfed baby is loose (soft to runny) and may be seedy or curdy.

Wet diapers: In the early days, baby typically has one wet diaper for each day of life (1 on day one, 2 on day two…). Once mom’s milk comes in, expect 5-6+ wet diapers every 24 hours. To feel what a sufficiently wet diaper is like, pour 3 tablespoons (45 mL) of water into a clean diaper. A piece of tissue in a disposable diaper will help you determine if the diaper is wet.

“Ideally, your baby will be put on your chest as soon as he’s born to give him access to the breast. He might feed, he might not; but give him the opportunity to do so,” says Cathy Garbin, an internationally renowned lactation consultant.

“Support his body and let him attempt to find his way to your breast and self-attach (you can watch videos of this process, called the ‘breast crawl’, online). However, if your baby doesn’t attach, healthcare professionals are usually very skilled at helping mums with positioning. Baby-led attachment, with mum in a semi-reclined breastfeeding position, is a good way to start.”

So forget about weighing and dressing your baby in that special first hour, or at least until after the first breastfeed. Enjoy relaxed cuddles and plenty of naked skin-to-skin contact with him. This will get oxytocin – ‘the love hormone’ – flowing in both of you, which is essential for the release of your first milk, colostrum.3

What If I have A Caesarean Section?

Having a C-section does not mean you cannot be successful in breastfeeding

If you have a c-section or there are other complications, you may still be able to have skin-to-skin time with your baby and breastfeed in the first few hours.

“If you aren’t able to hold your baby, the next best thing is for him to have skin-to-skin contact with your partner instead. This will help keep your baby feeling safe, loved and warm until you’re ready,” says Cathy.

If your baby is unable to breastfeed, then it’s a good idea to start expressing your milk early and frequently until he is able. “While breastfeeding directly as soon as possible gives mum and baby a good start, it’s not essential,” reassures Cathy. “What’s more important is to initiate your milk supply so you can work towards breastfeeding later if needed.”

You can hand express and use the hospital breast pump to help initiate your milk supply in the beginning.5 The precious colostrum you collect can then be given to your baby. This is especially important if he is premature or poorly, because your breast milk has so many wonderful health benefits.

Don’t feel like breastfeeding is unachievable if your baby arrives early or has medical complications that stop him feeding at the start, either. “I’ve worked with many, many mums where their baby hasn’t breastfed directly from the breast at all in the first six weeks due to a premature arrival or other difficulties.

A Good Latch Is A Set Up For Successful Breastfeeding

If you are having issues with your baby latch,seek professional help

Good attachment is crucial for getting breastfeeding off to a good start,6 as your baby’s latch affects how well he drinks the milk and consequently how he grows and develops. A poor latch can cause sore or damaged nipples, so never worry about asking a healthcare professional to check your attachment, even if you’ve been told the latch is fine and you don’t notice an obvious problem – especially while you’re still at your birth facility.

“Every time I fed in hospital, I buzzed a midwife to check the latch,” says Emma, mum of two, Australia. “There were a few times I thought I had it right but it was painful and the midwife helped take my baby off and do it properly. It meant I had the confidence to do that at home.”

When your baby is latching on, aim your nipple towards the roof of his mouth. This way he will latch on to the nipple, as well as some of the areola beneath it. This means he can draw both the nipple and some breast tissue into his mouth and feed well.6

“The latch should feel pretty comfortable and like a tugging sensation rather than a pain,” says Cathy. “Your baby will have his mouth wide open. His bottom lip may be flanged outwards, but his top lip will rest comfortably on your breast. His body language will show he is comfortable. There’s not going to be a large volume of milk at this early stage, so you won’t see much swallowing, although your baby will be sucking a lot and feeding lots of times.”

Mamas The following Things Are Normal: Do Not Give Baby Formula If You Intend To Breastfeed Exclusively

Never swap formula for exclusive breastfeeding

Many mothers shorten their breastfeeding journey by thinking baby is hungry during the early 2 weeks. I have counselled many mothers who succumbed to formula exposure. Mamas all you have to do is continue to breastfeed as long as baby is sucking. Lets look at the following events that most babies go through: Remember these events are only temporary.

  • Frequent and/or long feedings.
  • Varying nursing pattern from day to day.
  • Cluster nursing (very frequent to constant nursing) for several hours—usually evenings—each day. This may coincide with the normal “fussy time” that most babies have in the early months.
  • Growth spurts, where baby nurses more often than usual for several days and may act very fussy. Common growth spurt times in the early weeks are the first few days at home, 7 – 10 days, 2 – 3 weeks and 4 – 6 weeks.

Sleep When Baby Sleeps

When they say to sleep while baby is sleeping, it is definitely true that you should! This is NOT just a friendly piece of advice to pamper the new mom – it is a necessity. Your endorphins/adrenaline will carry you for about a week before you crash – hard. Don’t let that happen – get help from family and friends, and focus on recovering from childbirth and on breastfeeding.

Preparation Is Key: (PAID LINKS ARE HERE) at least 2 good supportive nursing bras, nursing pads, 100% purified lanolin for sore nipples, pajamas with easy access for nursing (not necessarily expensive nursing pajamas, even pajamas with button up or pull up tops will do), and frozen peas/gel packs and cabbage to ease any breast engorgement/soreness/inflammation. This is the bare minimum equipment; some moms also find it helpful to have a rocker, a sling, a pump, breastmilk storage bottles or bags, a nursing pillow, or other items, but you can do fine without these, too.

GET IT ON: Breastfeed your baby as soon as possible after you deliver. Babies who are breastfed within the first hour generally have more successful breastfeeding experiences than those who aren’t. Any medical procedures that aren’t urgent may be delayed to accommodate this important first step, and many procedures can be done while the baby is breastfeeding.

Bottom Line:

Bringing your baby home is simply wonderful. Choosing to breastfeed is indeed one of the best decisions you can make for your family. Breast changes will occur. I encourage you to breastfeed for 2-3 hours and aim for 8times ensuring a good latch. Determine that your baby is getting enough by paying attention to those soiled nappies. Your baby will have growth spurts that call for more breastfeeding; not the need for formula. Sleep when your baby is sleeping and know that the more you breastfeed, the more milk you will make and the less you breastfeed, the less milk you will make. Even if you had a C-section you can still breastfeed. Thank you for stopping by today and do visit again. Let me know in the comments how you are doing with this journey.

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Breastfeeding And Multiples: Excellent Tips To Making It Easier


Breastfeeding multiples is possible!

Having more than one baby may seem very daunting when it comes to breastfeeding. Many persons also believe that it is not possible. You might be surprised by how many mothers exclusively breastfeed their twins and, with higher order multiples becoming more commonplace, even mothers with triplets or more have great success with nursing their babies. All mothers can breastfeed more than one infant provided they have the right information, family, and community support.

Breastfeeding Has So Many Benefits: Breastfeeding Multiples Is Worth It

Smart Babies are a product of breastfeeding

The numerous benefits of breastfeeding are undeniable. For multiples, who are often at a developmental disadvantage due to low birth weight or prematurity, being breastfed can give them a wonderful boost. Consider the following benefits:

  • Nursing aids jaw, teeth, and facial development.
  • Antibodies in breast milk protect infants from illness.
  • Breastfed babies have fewer allergies.
  • Breastfed babies have fewer ear infections.
  • Studies have shown that breastfed babies have higher IQs.
  • Some studies suggest that breastfed babies grow up to have less incidence of obesity and hypertension.
  • The close contact between mother and babies while nursing enhances bonding and helps the babies feel secure.

Breastfeeding also benefits the mother in several ways. For example:

  • Nursing after childbirth increases the level of oxytocin in the mother, stimulating the uterus to return to normal more quickly.
  • Mothers who breastfeed generally lose weight more rapidly.
  • There is some evidence to suggest that breastfeeding reduces the mother’s risks of certain cancers.

Tandem Feeding

Best Positions for Tandem Breastfeeding?

Choose whatever makes breastfeeding easy for you

To find your best arrangement you will need to experiment and to try a variety of pillows (including a U-shaped nursing pillow). The positioning that works best is likely to change as your baby grows. Following are some options to consider:

  • Initially, semi-reclining (with pillows behind your back) may be easier than sitting or lying flat.
  • Double-cradle: both children in cradle position, with newborn’s legs resting on toddler.
  • Double-football: toddler can have his/her head on a nursing pillow and body stretching away on the couch; alternatively, your toddler can be sitting next to you with knees away from you.
  • Various combinations with one child in cradle position & one child in football hold.
  • Try side-lying with the newborn on the bed; you can then have your toddler perch on your side, or kneel behind you and dip his head down (pop-over nursing position).
  • Lying on your back: you can prop a child on each side with a pillow supporting their bodies.

Simultaneous nursing can be hard to coordinate at first, and for some women it triggers a strong agitation. It may get easier as your baby gets older and more used to nursing, and as your toddler gets used to the baby.

Breastfeeding multiples Promotes Bonding with Your Babies

Multiples are exciting

Learning you are pregnant with twins, triplets or more changes your expectations and plans. But your decision to breastfeed doesn’t have to change. Mother’s milk is especially important for multiples, who are often small at birth and need all the health benefits it provides. Breastfeeding also helps you create a special bond with each of your babies. Many mothers have nursed their multiples; you can enjoy nurturing your babies this way, too. I could imagine the wonder of the news that you are pregnant with multiples. I have asked some women what was their reaction to the news. Some of them laughed with disbelief while others cried.

 A healthy diet with plenty of protein, complex carbohydrates and good fats will get you all off to a good start. Gaining healthy amounts of weight during pregnancy is good for your babies’ birth weights and may also help prevent premature birth. Even with good care, you might experience complications during pregnancy so it helps to be prepared. Ask your midwife for information on warning signs for premature labour. Seek medical attention quickly if any occur, or you have any of these symptoms: a severe headache or stomach ache, see spots in front of your eyes, or feel extremely irritable or tense.

Planning Ahead Is Essential For Success

Limit visitors

Limit visitors while in hospital and in the early days to those you feel comfortable breastfeeding in front of. When nursing two babies at once, you may feel exposed, at least until you can manage both babies and keeping your breasts covered. Tell friends and family you need time to recover and suggest they visit later, or drop round a meal!

Separation Should Not Stop Breastfeeding: Skin To Skin Away

Any separation after birth may make breastfeeding harder, but it’s still possible. Hold, or at least touch, your babies immediately after the birth or as soon as you can. You can still touch and stroke a baby in special care and may be able to hold him against you in ‘kangaroo mother care’. If he can’t breastfeed, express your milk for him.

This is the most important thing you can do whilst you are waiting to start breastfeeding. When you are back together, spend as much time as possible snuggling together skin-to-skin or lightly dressed to establish breastfeeding. If you need to express your milk because one or both babies can’t nurse, hand expression is useful in the first few days.

Express Milk from Breasts Regularly

Eight times a day is ideal for milk expression

Plan to express from both breasts at least eight times in 24 hours, about every two to three hours during the day and at least once during the night. As your milk increases, you can switch to a hospital grade automatic electric pump.
Once breastfeeding is established, most mothers of multiples find nursing two at once is easiest and it saves time to co-ordinate feeds. Biological Nurturing™ positions can leave your hands free.
Breastfeeding at night lying down gives you more rest. It gets easier as your babies grow. In the meantime, use enough pillows to recline in bed and feed two babies at once. Keep a drink and snack handy plus books or music to pass the time.

Can I Make Enough Milk For My Multiples?

Oh yes you can Mama! The more milk your babies take, the more your breasts will make. This is especially important in the first few weeks. Since mothers of multiples usually experience more breast development during pregnancy, mothers of twins can almost always produce enough milk for both babies, and triplets can also be totally breastfed.

Encourage each baby to feed at least 8–10 times in 24 hours. If one of your babies is too sleepy or groggy to rouse himself every few hours, you will need to wake him to feed to ensure he gets enough milk. See our page Sleepy Baby—why and what to do. At first you may feel you are doing nothing but feeding, but things will settle down as your babies grow and your milk production adjusts. Practical help with everything else will allow you to sit or lie down and concentrate on the important job of establishing breastfeeding.

Take Good Care Of Yourself

  • You’ll be busy looking after your babies but don’t forget to look after yourself too. Try to eat a balanced diet and drink enough. Get as much rest as possible, and sleep whenever your babies sleep.
  • Looking after your babies will be a full-time job for quite a while so expect to do only the absolute minimum of housework.
  • Others will offer help with housework or entertaining older children—do accept and make an effort to ask for help when you need it! Have a list of simple tasks ready to make it easier when people do offer help and you could share information from our pageSupporting a Breastfeeding Mother.
  • Your partner or support person will have a crucial role both practically and emotionally. Because they are needed so much, non-gestational parents of multiples have the opportunity to quickly develop close relationships with their babies. Other family members may also enjoy the chance to be practically involved. Take moments to appreciate this special time and be proud that you can nourish and nurture two or more little human beings at once!

Get As Much Help As Possible: Use Available Resources

Other sources of practical help

  • Midwives, health visitors, clinics
  •  Homestart – a charity which offers support and friendship to families who are struggling to cope for a variety of reasons.
  •  Local college students studying child development or members of local community groups.

What About Travelling In The Car?

It can be challenging leaving the house with more than one baby. Start by going out briefly with someone else to help. It should get easier and easier as you continue to practice.

  • Keep a changing bag packed and ready. A backpack leaves your hands free.
  • Keep valuables and keys safe to hand in a waist pack or small bag across your chest.
  • Consider using a sling or carrier for one baby even when out with a pushchair. A double pushchair can be useful for carrying shopping too.
  • Alternate which baby gets carried: it’s easy to overlook a quieter baby’s need for closeness if one fusses more when out and about.
  • Think about suitable places for feeding ahead of time. Look out for your babies’ early feeding cues so you can offer a feed before they start to fuss and attract attention from others.

Get to know your babies: with time, you will come to know your babies as individuals. Take opportunities to give them a little undivided attention: feeding, nappy changes etc. A few minutes here and there all add up. Their personalities will soon show through.

Breastfeeding Twins and Triplets UK is a charity providing breastfeeding information and support run by breastfeeding counsellors.

Bottom Line

If properly planned, breastfeeding multiples can be easy and less challenging. Nursing after birth actually increases your milk production. Traveling can be challenging but you can seek help and use your available resources. Taking care of yourself is necessary to taking care of your multiples. Make expression of milk a common practice. Aim for at least 8 times per day. Breastfeeding your multiples promotes bonding. Finding the best positions that meets your needs and preferences is paramount in making it easier for you and your multiples. Thank you for stopping by today nd do visit again. If you are a parent of multiples share in the comment how you are coping.