The Pacifier: When is the Best Time to Wean?


Many parents are wondering , when is it the right time to wean the pacifier

The pacifier can serve many useful purposes for baby’s little stresses. Many parents are wondering when is the right time to wean baby from the pacifier. The American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Academy of Family Physicians suggest restricting or halting pacifier use around a half year to stay away from an expanded danger of ear diseases, particularly if your youngster is inclined to them. Yet, there is no immovable principle. Pacifiers can be extremely useful in easing pressure, in circumstances like beginning childcare or venturing out to another spot.

Following 9 months, however, youngsters build up an enthusiastic connection to their binky. That doesn’t mean you should surge your little one to surrender it—simply be ready for additional fights after this age and trouble in disposing of the pacifier.

What age is a child ready for weaning of the pacifier?

By the age of 2-4 years, most infants are physically able to stop using the pacifier. As a result, you will want to begin sowing the seed in your child’s mind that the time to say farewell is approaching.

How to Stop Pacifier Use

If you’re tired of picking up the binky your tot keeps tossing out of the crib, or if he’s getting ear infections (from the pacifier), or if you’re just ready to wean it, here’s how to do the job. There are 2 ways. The fastest way and the slow way. We do not know how your baby will respond so you can try both.


Slow and steady wins the race. To stick to this strategy, you’ll need to set a solid foundation. can

  1. Toddler chat. Talk  to your child and let them know that soon they will not need the paci.  That they will be old enough to not have a  pacifier. Plant the notion in their heads that they should do so by reading them tales of other (real or imaginary) peers who have done it. Enable your toddler to see you boasting to their beloved teddy about how your toddler is going to be a big brother or sister soon by tossing the paci away.

2.Be patient –Remember taking a pacifier away will take some time so be patient
Take a moment…for some reassurance if you’re feeling pressed to crack your child’s pacifier habit, however you know your child isn’t ready.

3. Pacifiers are preferable to thumbs because sucking on fingers will severely deform the palate and teeth, necessitating the use of dental braces. To begin, keep in mind that in western cultures, toddlers often suck at the breast before they are four years old. Second, certain children have a deep evolutionary drive (on one or both sides of the family) to fall in love with a calming item (binky, nipple, teddy, or comfort blanket), which is why taking away the pacifier sometimes results in increased thumb sucking.

4.Tools can be shared. Show your child that they can do without their pacifier by gradually increasing the time between when they ask for it and when you give it to them. Instead, provide them with other forms of warmth or allow them to stay close to you on your chest. Praise them enthusiastically as they manage to go without the paci.
There is a limit. Use your intuition to determine when your child needs a pacifier and when they can do without. Set a goal for yourself.

5. Reward your child as you go along the journey. Your child may experience some crying moments, but you must be prepared to endure the weaning process.

Your kid is stepping outside of their comfort zone, and they should be rewarded for it. Some parents use sticker charts to make their children see how many days they’ve been without using a pacifier. Other types of incentives are well for some kids. You are the expert on what you know your child will like!

Bottom line

Thank you for stopping by today. I hope I was able to help you out today. I wish you every success as you wean your little one from the pacifier. It can be challenging for some, but be determined to hold out to the end.