How to Know If Your Baby Is Getting Enough Breast Milk

We all need confidence in knowing that our little stars are getting enough breast milk

Hello Mamas! and Dads! We all want to know that baby is getting enough breast milk don’t we? Of course we do . If the little star is not getting enough, we know that many things can go wrong .e.g. a very hungry, crying baby, sleepless nights for both parents and baby, a malnourished baby with possible hospitalization. It is easier to approximate how much a formula fed baby is getting better than a breastfed baby.

The good thing with the breastfed baby is this baby can be fed every time he wants to feed. This is called demand feed. Mamas the good news is the more baby sucks your breast, the more milk you make.

It may take a little while before you feel confident your baby is getting what they need.

“Your baby will generally let you know, but wet and dirty nappies are a good indication, as well as hearing your baby swallow,” says Zoe Ralph, an infant feeding worker in Manchester and Fellow of the Institute of Health Visiting.

Exclusive breastfeeding (breast milk only) is recommended for around the first 6 months of your baby’s life. Introducing bottle feeds will reduce the amount of breast milk you produce. So if you want your baby to get more breast milk you must give more of your breast milk. The less breastfeeding, the less milk your body will make.

A Great Latch Is A Must To Ensure That Your Baby Is Getting Enough

Breastfeeding your baby is one of the best things you can do to build up his immune system
  • Your baby has a wide mouth and a large mouthful of breast.
  • Your baby’s chin is touching your breast, their lower lip is rolled down (you can’t always see this) and their nose isn’t squashed against your breast.
  • You don’t feel any pain in your breasts or nipples when your baby is feeding, although the first few sucks may feel strong.
  • You can see more of the dark skin around your nipple (areola) above your baby’s top lip than below their bottom lip.
  • Your baby starts feeds with a few rapid sucks followed by long, rhythmic sucks and swallows with occasional pauses.
  • You can hear and see your baby swallowing.
  • Your baby’s cheeks stay rounded, not hollow, during sucking.
  • They seem calm and relaxed during feeds.
  • Your baby comes off the breast on their own at the end of feeds.
  • Their mouth looks moist after feeds.
  • Your baby appears content and satisfied after most feeds.
  • Your breasts feel softer after feeds.
  • Your nipple looks more or less the same after feeds – not flattened, pinched or white.
  • You may feel sleepy, thirsty, and relaxed after feeds.
  • Your newborn is latching on and breastfeeding on a schedule—at least every 2 to 3 hours,2 or 8 to 12 times each day.
  • You’re changing wet (urine) diapers. After the fifth day of life, your baby should be having at least 6 to 8 wet diapers per day.2
  • You can hear your little one swallowing while she’s breastfeeding, and you can see breast milk in her mouth.
  • After breastfeeding your breasts feel softer and not as full as they did before the feeding. 
  • Your child appears satisfied and content after nursing, and he sleeps between breastfeeding’s.

Watch Out For Your Baby’s Weight Gain

n the first few days of life, it is normal for a breastfed baby to lose up to 10% of his or her body weight.1 But, after the first few days, a consistent weight gain is the best way to confirm that your baby is getting enough nutrition.

What Should I Expect From My Baby’s Stools?

The first poop that your baby will pass is called meconium. It’s thick, sticky, and black or dark green. Newborns have at least one or two of these meconium stools a day for the first two days.3 Then, as the meconium passes out of your baby’s body, his bowel movements will turn greenish-yellow before they become a looser, mustard yellow breastfeeding stool that may or may not have milk curds called “seeds” in it.

What Are Growth Spurts?

Watch those growth spurts

Does your baby seem very fussy or easily irritated at times? If your answer is yes, your baby could be experiencing what we call growth spurts. If your baby has been breastfeeding well, and then all of a sudden seems to want to nurse all the time and appears less satisfied, it may not be a problem with your supply of breast milk. It may be a growth spurt.(Paid link).

All babies are unique and have growth spurts at different times. Some of the common times that newborns and infants may have a growth spurt are at approximately ten days, three weeks, six weeks, three months, and six months of age.4

During a growth spurt, a child breastfeeds more often. This increase in breastfeeding usually only lasts a few days. It’s needed to stimulate your body to make more breast milk to meet your baby’s growing nutritional needs.

During the first two months, your baby should be breastfeeding every two to three hours, even throughout the night. After two months, some babies will begin to have longer stretches between breastfeeding’s during the night.

Again, every baby is different, and while some babies will sleep through the night by three months of age, others may not sleep through the night for many months. The same sleep pattern is also true of formula-fed infants, and it is not an indicator that your baby is not getting enough breast milk.5

Keep Your Well Child Exam Visits And Seek Medical Assistance

You will see your baby’s pediatrician or healthcare provider within a few days of leaving the hospital to check your child’s weight, and make sure she’s breastfeeding well and getting enough breast milk. It’s very important to continue to see your baby’s doctor at regular intervals.

Here are some signs that your newborn may not be getting enough breast milk.

  • Your newborn is not breastfeeding well.
  • Your child is very sleepy and does not wake up for most feedings.
  • Your little one has pink, red, or very dark yellow concentrated urine or less than six wet diapers a day after the fifth day of life.
  • Your baby is crying, sucking, and showing signs of hunger even with frequent breastfeeding.

Speak to your doctor or a lactation consultant as soon as possible to have the baby examined and your breastfeeding technique checked. The sooner you get help for any difficulties that may arise, the easier it will be to correct the problems and get breastfeeding back on the right track.

Bottom line

We know that every parent wants to know for sure that her baby is getting enough milk. It is important for you to ensure that your baby is properly latched on . You must also be aware that growth spurts are real and you should not give formula if you are exclusively breastfeeding. All you need to do is continue to breastfeed. Also you should observe your baby’s diapers, knowing what is normal and what is not. Being aware of warning signs of when to visit your pediatrician. I wish you every success. I hope you have learned something to help you to know when your baby is full. Thank you for stopping by today and do come again. Please like, comment or ask a question below. This website contains affiliate links, which means I earn a small commission from products and services you purchase through my links at no extra cause to you


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