How to Know If Your Baby Is Getting Enough Breast Milk


We all need confidence in knowing that our little stars are getting enough breast milk

Hello Mamas! and Dads! We all want to know that baby is getting enough breast milk don’t we? Of course we do . If the little star is not getting enough, we know that many things can go wrong .e.g. a very hungry, crying baby, sleepless nights for both parents and baby, a malnourished baby with possible hospitalization. It is easier to approximate how much a formula fed baby is getting better than a breastfed baby.

The good thing with the breastfed baby is this baby can be fed every time he wants to feed. This is called demand feed. Mamas the good news is the more baby sucks your breast, the more milk you make.

It may take a little while before you feel confident your baby is getting what they need.

“Your baby will generally let you know, but wet and dirty nappies are a good indication, as well as hearing your baby swallow,” says Zoe Ralph, an infant feeding worker in Manchester and Fellow of the Institute of Health Visiting.

Exclusive breastfeeding (breast milk only) is recommended for around the first 6 months of your baby’s life. Introducing bottle feeds will reduce the amount of breast milk you produce. So if you want your baby to get more breast milk you must give more of your breast milk. The less breastfeeding, the less milk your body will make.

A Great Latch Is A Must To Ensure That Your Baby Is Getting Enough

Breastfeeding your baby is one of the best things you can do to build up his immune system
  • Your baby has a wide mouth and a large mouthful of breast.
  • Your baby’s chin is touching your breast, their lower lip is rolled down (you can’t always see this) and their nose isn’t squashed against your breast.
  • You don’t feel any pain in your breasts or nipples when your baby is feeding, although the first few sucks may feel strong.
  • You can see more of the dark skin around your nipple (areola) above your baby’s top lip than below their bottom lip.
  • Your baby starts feeds with a few rapid sucks followed by long, rhythmic sucks and swallows with occasional pauses.
  • You can hear and see your baby swallowing.
  • Your baby’s cheeks stay rounded, not hollow, during sucking.
  • They seem calm and relaxed during feeds.
  • Your baby comes off the breast on their own at the end of feeds.
  • Their mouth looks moist after feeds.
  • Your baby appears content and satisfied after most feeds.
  • Your breasts feel softer after feeds.
  • Your nipple looks more or less the same after feeds – not flattened, pinched or white.
  • You may feel sleepy, thirsty, and relaxed after feeds.
  • Your newborn is latching on and breastfeeding on a schedule—at least every 2 to 3 hours,2 or 8 to 12 times each day.
  • You’re changing wet (urine) diapers. After the fifth day of life, your baby should be having at least 6 to 8 wet diapers per day.2
  • You can hear your little one swallowing while she’s breastfeeding, and you can see breast milk in her mouth.
  • After breastfeeding your breasts feel softer and not as full as they did before the feeding. 
  • Your child appears satisfied and content after nursing, and he sleeps between breastfeeding’s.

Watch Out For Your Baby’s Weight Gain

n the first few days of life, it is normal for a breastfed baby to lose up to 10% of his or her body weight.1 But, after the first few days, a consistent weight gain is the best way to confirm that your baby is getting enough nutrition.

What Should I Expect From My Baby’s Stools?

The first poop that your baby will pass is called meconium. It’s thick, sticky, and black or dark green. Newborns have at least one or two of these meconium stools a day for the first two days.3 Then, as the meconium passes out of your baby’s body, his bowel movements will turn greenish-yellow before they become a looser, mustard yellow breastfeeding stool that may or may not have milk curds called “seeds” in it.

What Are Growth Spurts?

Watch those growth spurts

Does your baby seem very fussy or easily irritated at times? If your answer is yes, your baby could be experiencing what we call growth spurts. If your baby has been breastfeeding well, and then all of a sudden seems to want to nurse all the time and appears less satisfied, it may not be a problem with your supply of breast milk. It may be a growth spurt.(Paid link).

All babies are unique and have growth spurts at different times. Some of the common times that newborns and infants may have a growth spurt are at approximately ten days, three weeks, six weeks, three months, and six months of age.4

During a growth spurt, a child breastfeeds more often. This increase in breastfeeding usually only lasts a few days. It’s needed to stimulate your body to make more breast milk to meet your baby’s growing nutritional needs.

During the first two months, your baby should be breastfeeding every two to three hours, even throughout the night. After two months, some babies will begin to have longer stretches between breastfeeding’s during the night.

Again, every baby is different, and while some babies will sleep through the night by three months of age, others may not sleep through the night for many months. The same sleep pattern is also true of formula-fed infants, and it is not an indicator that your baby is not getting enough breast milk.5

Keep Your Well Child Exam Visits And Seek Medical Assistance

You will see your baby’s pediatrician or healthcare provider within a few days of leaving the hospital to check your child’s weight, and make sure she’s breastfeeding well and getting enough breast milk. It’s very important to continue to see your baby’s doctor at regular intervals.

Here are some signs that your newborn may not be getting enough breast milk.

  • Your newborn is not breastfeeding well.
  • Your child is very sleepy and does not wake up for most feedings.
  • Your little one has pink, red, or very dark yellow concentrated urine or less than six wet diapers a day after the fifth day of life.
  • Your baby is crying, sucking, and showing signs of hunger even with frequent breastfeeding.

Speak to your doctor or a lactation consultant as soon as possible to have the baby examined and your breastfeeding technique checked. The sooner you get help for any difficulties that may arise, the easier it will be to correct the problems and get breastfeeding back on the right track.

Bottom line

We know that every parent wants to know for sure that her baby is getting enough milk. It is important for you to ensure that your baby is properly latched on . You must also be aware that growth spurts are real and you should not give formula if you are exclusively breastfeeding. All you need to do is continue to breastfeed. Also you should observe your baby’s diapers, knowing what is normal and what is not. Being aware of warning signs of when to visit your pediatrician. I wish you every success. I hope you have learned something to help you to know when your baby is full. Thank you for stopping by today and do come again. Please like, comment or ask a question below. This website contains affiliate links, which means I earn a small commission from products and services you purchase through my links at no extra cause to you


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How To Calm A Crying Baby: Getting Positive Results


Finding what works for you and your baby are keys in calming your little star

There is nothing in the world like a calm comfortable baby. Sometimes my babies cried so much that when they finally fell asleep, I would find myself whispering and asking the rest of the family to please be as quiet as possible because baby was sleeping. Do you know what I mean mommy? Today we are going to learn how to calm your baby. Yes I am going to give you good tips that worked for me. It may take a few tries, but with patience and practice you’ll find out what works and what doesn’t for your baby. I hope they work also for you.

Did you know that your baby came from a noisy environment?

Babies in utero are rocked and swayed. They’re bombarded with the whooshing and gurgling sounds of their mother’s body and cradled by the walls of their “room.” No wonder, Karp says, they feel insecure and unhappy when lying alone in a quiet nursery, their arms and legs loose and flailing.(Paid link)

“Most babies doze much better when surrounded by some of the soothing sensations they enjoyed in the womb. These sensations work so well because they turn on a calming reflex – an off-switch for crying and on-switch for sleep that all babies are born with.”

  • Swaddle your baby in a large, thin blanket (ask your nurse or child’s doctor to show you how to do it correctly) to help her feel secure.
  • Hold your baby in your arms and place her body on her left side to help digestion or stomach for support. Gently rub her back. If your baby goes to sleep, remember to always lay her down in her crib on her back.
  • Turn on a calming sound. Sounds that remind babies of being inside the womb may be calming, such as a white noise device, the humming sound of a fan, or the recording of a heartbeat.
  • Walk your baby in a body carrier or rock her. Calming motions remind babies of movements they felt in the womb.
  • Avoid overfeeding your baby because this may also make her uncomfortable. Try to wait at least 2 to 2½ hours from the beginning of one feeding to the next.
  • If it is not yet time to feed your baby, offer the breast or pacifier if breastfeeding is established. Many babies are calmed by sucking.
  • If food sensitivity is the cause of discomfort, a change in diet may help.
    • For breastfed babies: Moms may try changing their own diet. See if your baby gets less fussy if you cut down on milk ­products or caffeine. If there is no ­difference after making the dietary changes, resume your usual diet. Avoiding spicy or gassy foods like onions or ­cabbage has worked for some moms, but this has not been ­scientifically proven.
    • For bottle-fed babies: Ask your child’s ­doctor if you should try a different for­mula. This has been shown to be helpful for some babies.
  • Keep a diary of when your baby is awake, asleep, eating, and crying. Write down how long it takes your baby to eat or if your baby cries the most after eating. Talk with your child’s doctor about these behaviors to see if her crying is related to sleeping or eating.
  • Limit each daytime nap to no longer than 3 hours a day. Keep your baby calm and quiet when you feed or change her during the night by avoiding bright lights and noises, such as the TV.(Paid link)

How do I swaddle a baby?

  • Lay a blanket on a flat surface like a diamond and fold down the top corner about 6 inches to form a straight edge.
  • Place your baby on his back so that the top of the fabric is at shoulder level.
  • Bring your baby’s left arm down. Pull the corner of the blanket near his left hand over his arm and chest, and tuck the leading edge under his back on his right side.
  • Bring your baby’s right arm down. Pull the corner of the blanket near his right hand over his arm and chest, and tuck the cloth under his left side.
  • Twist or fold the bottom end of the blanket and tuck it loosely behind your baby, making sure that both legs are bent up and out from his body, his hips can move, and his legs can spread apart naturally.

How To Keep Yourself Calm When Your Baby Is Fussy

Keeping yourself calm when your baby is fussy is one of the best things you can do

If you have tried to calm your crying baby but nothing seems to work, you may need to take a moment for yourself. Crying can be tough to handle, especially if you’re physically tired and mentally exhausted.

  • Take a deep breath and count to 10.
  • Place your baby in a safe place, such as crib or playpen without blankets and stuffed animals; leave the room; and let your baby cry alone for about 10 to 15 minutes.
  • While your baby is in a safe place, consider some actions that may help calm you down.
  • Listen to music for a few minutes.
  • Call a friend or family member for ­emotional support.
  • Do simple household chores, such as vacuuming or washing the dishes.
  • If you have not calmed after 10 to 15 minutes, check on your baby but do not pick up your baby until you feel you have calmed down.
  • Determine if your baby has a fever. If over 100 there is cause for concern.
  • Make sure your baby is not clad with too many clothes
  • Check your baby’s diaper. Babies hate soiled diapers.
  • When you have calmed down, go back and pick up your baby. If your baby is still crying, retry soothing measures.
  • Call your child’s doctor. There may be a medical reason why your baby is crying.
  • Try to be patient. Keeping your baby safe is the most important thing you can do. It is normal to feel upset, frustrated, or even angry, but it is important to keep your behavior under control. Remember, it is never safe to shake, throw, hit, slam, or jerk any child—and it never solves the problem!

Bottom line

All babies at some point in their growth will become fussy and irritable. Knowing how to handle these times is important to prevent you from getting burnout. Calming your baby can happen in many ways. I hope you never get burn out and find a solution to calming your baby. Remember God loves you and He cares. Ask Him to give you the wisdom you need to taking care of your little star. If you have a topic you would like for me to talk about, let me know below. This website contains affiliate links, which means I earn a small commission from products and services you purchase through my links at no extra cause to you.

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Breastfeeding And Your Period: Understanding What Happens


Many new moms wonder when they will see their period. I was one of them.

Your period is connected to fertility, pregnancy, and even breastfeeding. Missing a period is one of the first signs of pregnancy, and while you’re pregnant, the hormones in your body keep your period away.

Then, if you decide to breastfeed, your period may stay away for weeks, months, or longer. So, when should you expect your period to return and how will menstruation affect breastfeeding and your baby?

You may have many questions about what to expect once your baby is born. Here’s what you need to know about breastfeeding and your period.

There are so many questions surrounding breastfeeding and periods, with so much info out there it is hard to know when will your period come back while breastfeeding. Every woman’s body is different and every breastfeeding journey is unique.

Lets begin with after the birth of the baby. 

After birth , certain conditions make it possible for you to see your period

The bleeding that you’ll have right after your baby is born may seem like a period, but that’s not actually what it is. It’s called lochia, and it’s a mixture of blood, mucus, and tissue from the lining of your uterus. Lochia starts out as bright red bleeding. It can be very heavy, and it may contain blood clots.

When do I see my period after my baby is born?

Breastfeeding could hold off your period longer. However, even if you do breastfeed, you could get your period back right away. You are more likely to get your period back sooner if:https://277810b69f2d58b215ad5b2cdea0fc8d.safeframe.googlesyndication.com/safeframe/1-0-37/html/container.html

Your Period and Breastfeeding: Here’s what happens

Breastfeeding after seeing your period is ok

When your period does return, it doesn’t mean you have to wean your baby. Breastfeeding while you have your period is perfectly safe. It’s not harmful to you or your child at all. There is no set time as to when your period will come back after delivery. Certain conditions will give certain results. Each woman is different.

Your breast milk is still healthy and nutritious for your baby. However, hormone changes in the days leading up to your period can affect your breast milk and your baby’s breastfeeding pattern for a few days.

You may not notice any difference in breastfeeding when your period returns. And, even if there are some changes, your baby may not mind and continue to breastfeed as usual.

It’s also possible that the return of your period can cause nipple tenderness, a dip in your breast milk supply, and for the taste of your breast milk to change.

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Research shows that the composition of breast milk changes around ovulation (mid-cycle).3 The levels of sodium and chloride in the milk go up while lactose (milk sugar) and potassium go down. So, the breast milk becomes saltier and less sweet during this time. 

Also around the time of ovulation and just before the start of your period, estrogen and progesterone levels change which can affect your breasts and your breast milk. When estrogen and progesterone levels go up, it can make your breasts feel full and tender.

Higher estrogen levels can also interfere with milk production. Studies also show that calcium levels in the blood go down after ovulation.4 The lower level of calcium may also contribute to sore nipples and a drop in the milk supply.

Here Is The Reason Why You Have No Period While Breastfeeding 

Breastfeeding can put off the return of your menstrual cycle for many months, a year, or even longer. The reason why many women do not get a period is that your body does not release hormones in your body that prepare you for a new pregnancy. It depends on your body and how often and how long you decide to breastfeed. Your period may stay away longer if you:

  • Breastfeed exclusively
  • Nurse both day and night
  • Keep your baby close to you by baby-wearing and co-sleeping
  • Avoid giving your child a bottle or a pacifier
  • Refrain from supplementing with formula or water
  • Hold off on starting solid foods until your little one is four to six months old

Once you are breastfeeding less often such as when your baby is sleeping through the night or you begin weaning, your period is more likely to start up again. Although, some women don’t get their period for a few months after breastfeeding has completely ended. When it finally shows up, breastfeeding more often will not get it to stop again.

Remember pumping or expressing breast milk by hand does not have the same effect on your body as breastfeeding does. If you choose to pump and bottle feed your baby, it will not hold off your period.( Paid link)

Period Return Equals- Fertility Is Here Again

When your period returns, you should consider yourself fertile.6 If you’re not ready to have another baby right away, you may want to look into birth control.

Your doctor will most likely talk to you about your birth control options during your first postpartum doctor visit at approximately four to six weeks after your baby is born. If not, bring it up and be sure to tell her that you’re breastfeeding since some types of birth control can interfere with your supply of breast milk.

Getting Pregnant Before Your Period Returns

Always remember that you can get pregnant before seeing your period

You can release an egg from your ovary (ovulate) before your period returns. Therefore, there is a chance that you can become pregnant while you’re breastfeeding even before your period comes back.

So, if you’re involved in an intimate relationship, and you’re not using birth control, it is possible to find yourself expecting again without ever getting your first postpartum period.

Breast Tenderness During Period

Take care of breastfeeding issues as soon as possible
Make sure to consult your lactation specialist for any issues with breastfeeding issues

It’s not uncommon to experience sore nipples when you get your period. So, for a few days before your period starts, it may be a little uncomfortable to breastfeed. Here are some tips to help you deal with nipple tenderness. (Paid link)

  • Try not to let the pain prevent you from breastfeeding, if possible.
  • Practice skin to skin and continue to put the baby to the breast so you can maintain your milk supply and prevent other breastfeeding problems such as breast engorgementnipple blebsplugged milk ducts, and mastitis.
  • Avoid using a numbing cream to try to relieve the pain. These products can numb your baby’s mouth and interfere with the let-down of your breast milk
  • Ask your doctor if it’s safe for you to use an over-the-counter pain reliever for the few days it hurts.
  • Pump your breast milk, if it’s too painful and you just cannot breastfeed. Pumping will help you keep up your milk supply while you’re waiting for the tenderness to pass. It also allows you to continue to give your baby your breast milk.

How to increase Your Milk Supply

The decrease in your milk supply related to your period is usually temporary. You may notice the dip during the few days before your period arrives. Then, once you get your period, your supply should begin to increase again as the hormones balance out. To combat a low breast milk supply during your period you can:5

  • Try to build up your breast milk supply naturally.
  • Use an herbal breastfeeding tea or another galactagogue to help boost your milk production.
  • Eat a well-balanced diet with iron-rich foods (red meat, leafy greens) and milk-making superfoods (oatmeal, almonds, fennel).
  • Drink plenty of fluids.
  • Try a combination of calcium and magnesium supplements such as 1000mg of calcium taken with 500mg of magnesium before and during your period.
  • Talk to your doctor, a lactation consultant, or a local breastfeeding group for more information and helpful advice.
  • Observe your baby’s soiled nappies.

If your milk supply drops too low, it could be dangerous for your baby. So, you should also:

Bottom line

Breastfeeding can affect your period, and your period can affect breastfeeding, your breast milk, and your baby. While many women do not notice any changes when their period returns, some women experience inconvenient or concerning issues.

It is so good to know that the most common breastfeeding problems that result from the return of your period are temporary. Of course, you may decide that the sore nipples and extra work it takes to keep up your milk supply are just too much. While it’s still safe and beneficial to breastfeed when you have your period, some moms choose to wean once their period returns.

It may even be easier if the baby is breastfeeding less due a lower breast milk supply and change in the flavor of the milk. While it’s true that the longer you can breastfeed, the better it is for you and your child, it’s really up to you and what works best for your family. Thank you for stopping by today. I hope you learned something. Do visit again and know that God loves you. Ask Him to help you as you go through your challenges through out life. I wish you every success in your breastfeeding journey. Leave a comment below, I would love to hear from you. .Just so you know, Breast Fed Is Best Academy may earn commissions from shopping links.

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