Breastfeeding And Galactagogues: Mamas, Lets Make More Milk!


Keep in mind that taking certain herbs while breastfeeding can have adverse effects. Before adding them to your diet in the hopes of increasing your milk supply, it’s important to consult your doctor.

I have nursed four babies and have never needed to take anything to boost my milk supply. However, I am aware that there may be some of you out there who may need a little help. First, what is a galactagogue?  It is a long word meaning “a substance that increases milk supply”. Herbs and medications that increase your milk supply are known as galactagogues (ga-lac-ti-gogs). If your milk supply is low, you might want to try using a natural foods, galactagogues or even prescription medication to help increase your milk production. The word “galactagogues” comes from the Greek “galacta,” meaning milk.

The best way to increase your milk supply is to take galactagogues while you increase the number of times you pump and breastfeed your baby. Note that breastfeeding mothers have been taking galactagogues throughout history to increase milk supply. I recommend you try the natural foods and pumping 8-10 times per day, and breastfeeding . Remember a pump cannot substitute for your little star’s sucking. It is the next best thing to do while breastfeeding is being established. Our aim when we use galactagogues in one main goal and that is to increase milk supply.

What About Beer And Alcohol?

Approximately 15% of breastfeeding women use herbs when they feel they need to increase their milk production. However, with the exception of Fenugreek, most of these herbal galactagogues have not been studied much to see if they do increase milk supply.  And while beer or alcohol is a traditional folk remedy for low milk supply, current studies indicate alcohol consumption is more likely to decrease infant consumption of milk than increase it (source). We really do not want your infant consumption to decrease. So this is something you should consider.

Herbal galactagogues: Can Be Very Effective

Some of the most well-known and anecdotally effective galactagogues are herbal. Tens of herbs are believed to increase breast milk for nursing mothers.

Many of these herbs stimulate mammary growth as well as provide hormonal support. Fenugreek, one of the most well-known galactagogues, is a Middle Eastern spice. Nettleblessed thistle, and ginger are other popular herbs that are thought to improve milk production.

Keep in mind that taking certain herbs while breastfeeding can have adverse effects. Before adding them to your diet in the hopes of increasing your milk supply, it’s important to consult your doctor.

Fenugreek

There are many common herbal supplements available that have been shown to be effective for increasing your milk production. Fenugreek is likely the most commonly used galactagogue. A seed extract that can quickly increase milk supply, the recommended daily dose is 3.5-6 grams depending on your doctor’s or lactation consultant’s advice. Some women notice they have a maple syrup smell when taking fenugreek. It may also cause contractions or an allergic reaction, do not take fenugreek if you are pregnant or allergic to peanuts or soybeans. (Paid link here)

Blessed Thistle

This plant has been used as a medicine for hundreds of years and has been shown to increase milk supply. It works best when taken in combination with fenugreek. It comes in capsule or tea form and should be taken three times per day.

Alfalfa

A type of pea, alfalfa has a mild effect on increasing milk supply and is often used in combination with fenugreek. You can take alfalfa in pill, tea, or food form. Alfalfa sprouts have a pleasant, nutty flavor and have a number of health benefits. You can also make tea from alfalfa leaves or take as a tablet.

Goat’s Rue

This herb can be a powerful galactagogue and is often taken along with a blend of fenugreek and other herbs. Do not use it in its fresh format as it is considered toxic; use only commercially prepared dry leaves for tea or capsules. These herbal supplements are readily available online or at your local health food store. Talk to your doctor or lactation consultant before taking any supplements, particularly if you have allergies or are taking any prescription medications.

Let A Galactagogue Be Your Last Resort

Mama give these tips a try first

If you’re concerned about your milk supply, the first step is to contact a certified health professional to help you.

It may turn out that you’re worrying unnecessarily, and that both your milk supply and your baby are just fine. If your supply is on the low side, a lactation consultant will be able to make recommendations for improving production.

These might include:

  • Skin-to-skin contact, which will release prolactin and stimulate oxytocin, two hormones that can help milk production
  • Breast compression, a method of gently squeezing the breast as you nurse to encourage milk glands to let down more milk
  • Comfortable positioning during breastfeeding
  • Frequent feedings or regular pumping sessions- 8-10 times per day or every 2-3 hours.
  • Pumping sufficient milk to meet you little star’s needs.
  • Drinking lots of fluids- Never allow your body to get thirsty.

Most women will find that these methods are enough to improve milk production. Give them a try first.

It’s also important to avoid habits and behaviors that can inhibit your milk supply, such as:

The cold and allergy medications can reduce your milk supply if you are on them a long time, but if you need them, its ok to get you well again. Make sure that you discuss with your healthcare provider.

Master Your Diet for Good Nutrition

The LLLI, nursing mothers is of the persuasion that breastfeeding mothers  don’t need special diets to produce milk for their babies. Instead of worrying about incorporating certain foods, La Leche advises following a healthy, sensible diet.

Try to include:

 Green papaya

This galactagogue is prized in Asia for its enzymes, vitamins, and minerals. It’s a particularly good source of vitamin A and vitamin C.

One small fruit contains nearly 100 milligrams (mg)Trusted Source of vitamin C. For women who are lactating, the recommended dietary allowance of vitamin C is only 115 to 120 mg each day.

Note that green papaya is the unripe fruit. It must be simmered until it’s soft enough to eat.

Fennel and fennel seed

The fennel seed is widely considered to increase milk production. The vegetable, which can be eaten raw or cooked, may also help. Discover other benefits of fennel. (Paid link here)

Grains

In addition to their reputed antibiotic and anti-inflammatory properties, oats are a well-known comfort food. It’s thought that eating something associated with comfort may cause a woman’s body to release oxytocin, a hormone involved in the production of milk.

Other grains that may function as possible galactagogues include milletbrown rice, and barley.

Chickpeas and lentils

Legumes, such as chickpeas and lentils, have long been touted for their milk-boosting properties.

Brewer’s yeast

Also known as nutritional yeast, brewer’s yeast is a good source of protein and iron. It also contains phytoestrogens, which may help with breast tissue health and lactation.

Nuts

Raw nuts, including cashewswalnuts, and macadamia nuts, are also believed to support the production of milk. (Paid link here)

Sesame seeds

Another Asian galactagogue, sesame seeds are a vegan source of calcium. Black or light-colored sesame seeds will work, as will tahini, a creamed version of the seed.

Lactation cookies

Recipes for lactation cookies often combine flax seeds, brewer’s yeast, oats, and other purported milk-boosting ingredients to get a delicious treat.(Here is the paid link to purchase your delicious lactation cookies)

Bottom line

Mamas there is nothing like breastfeeding your baby directly from the the breast. Breastfeeding your baby consistently is truly the best way to increase your milk supply. No foods or herbs have been reliably shown to increase milk production. There have however been many testimonies of moms who testify that their milk supply have increased as a result of taking these herbs. I sure hope your breastfeeding However, most of the foods listed above are nutritious and safe to add to your daily diet.

I hope your milk production is getting better and better as time goes on. Thanks for stopping by today. Do visit again. Please like, or comment. I would love to hear from you. Remember God loves you. Ask for His help in all things. Before adding specific galactagogues to your diet, be sure to discuss them with your doctor. This website contains affiliate links, which means I earn a small commission  from products and services you purchase through my links at no extra cause to you.


https://www.instagram.com/marilynsmith_3291/

Breastfeeding And The Covid -19 Vaccine: What Are The Risks?


Decisions must be made regarding the breastfeeding mother

This website contains affiliate links, which means I earn a small commission  from products and services you purchase through my links at no extra cause to you

The guidance could affect hundreds of thousands of women, including an estimated 20,000 frontline workers. About 46% of mothers in England were breastfeeding babies aged 6-8 weeks in 2018/19.

Dr Vicky Thomas of the Hospital Infant Feeding Network (HIFN) said she understood concerns but underlined the fact that there was “no evidence this vaccine would be harmful to breastfeeding mothers or their children and the risk seems to many to be minimal”. On 11th December, 2020 the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued the first emergency use authorization (EUA) for the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine to be used on people 16 and older in the United States. As the proposed timeline for distribution for the vaccine for adults begins to become clearer, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) also shared their guidance on the use of the vaccine for special populations — including pregnant and breastfeeding people.

(Paid link here)

For Soon – to -Be – Moms: Risk Is Low Without Complications!

Though the data on pregnant people shows that their absolute risk is low, per the CDC, there is an increased risk of these patients becoming severely ill (meaning potentially being admitted to an ICU, needing mechanical ventilation) if they do get COVID-19 or an increased risk of preterm birth or other adverse pregnancy outcomes. They note that while there’s no available data on pregnant people receiving any of the COVID-19 vaccines being tested right now — including the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine — studies on this demo are planned.

Do Pregnant Mothers Have A Choice In Choosing the Covid Vaccine ?

Absolutely! women’s rights and breastfeeding organisations are challenging government and NHS guidance that the groups say forces mothers to choose between feeding their infants in the way that they choose and protecting themselves from Covid by being vaccinated.

The NHS website advises lactating mothers to wait until they have stopped breastfeeding before having the Covid-19 vaccine. It adds: “There’s no evidence it’s unsafe if you’re pregnant or breastfeeding. But more evidence is needed before you can be offered the vaccine.”

The UK government website repeats the advice, saying it was “precautionary until additional evidence is available to support the use of this vaccine in pregnancy and breastfeeding”. There have been no trials of Covid vaccines on breastfeeding women. Dr Vicky Thomas of the Hospital Infant Feeding Network (HIFN) said denying women the opportunity to be protected, or alternatively forcing them to lose the health impacts of breastfeeding for themselves and their children is yet another example of the way women have been disproportionately affected by Covid-19.”

Dr Hannah Barham Brown, the deputy leader of the Women’s Equality Party and a trainee GP, said: “The vaccine is our best defence against Covid. To insist without any evidence that certain women shouldn’t access it is completely irresponsible, especially as women make up the majority of essential workers in high-risk jobs.

What Are the Informed Choices Women Breastfeeding Will Have to Make?

“Unless the regulatory bodies reassess their position, women will face an unacceptable choice between giving up breastfeeding or putting themselves and those around them at risk. What breastfeeding mothers need is the right to make an informed choice.”

As for safety, these vaccines are believed to be “unlikely to pose a risk for people who are pregnant” because they are mRNA vaccines. Per the CDC, unlike other vaccines which put “a weakened or inactivated germ into our bodies” to trigger an immune response, mRNA vaccines instead “teach our cells how to make a protein—or even just a piece of a protein—that triggers an immune response inside our bodies. That immune response, which produces antibodies, is what protects us from getting infected if the real virus enters our bodies.”

So, based on this working knowledge, the agency says that pregnant people who are “part of a group that is recommended to receive a COVID-19 vaccine (e.g., healthcare personnel)” can choose to be vaccinated.

Who Are The Decision Makers In This Critical Matter?

“A conversation between the patient and their clinical team may assist with decisions regarding the use of vaccines approved under EUA for the prevention of COVID-19. While a conversation with a healthcare provider may be helpful, it is not required prior to vaccination,” per the CDC. “When making a decision, pregnant people and their healthcare providers should consider the level of COVID-19 community transmission, the patient’s personal risk of contracting COVID-19, the risks of COVID-19 to the patient and potential risks to the fetus, the efficacy of the vaccine, the side effects of the vaccine and the lack of data about the vaccine during pregnancy.

(Paid link)

Pregnant people who experience fever following vaccination may be counseled to take acetaminophen as fever has been associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. Acetaminophen may be offered as an option for pregnant people experiencing other post-vaccination symptoms as well. There is no recommendation for routine testing before receipt of a COVID-19 vaccine. Those who are trying to become pregnant do not need to avoid pregnancy after Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccination.” Women should be able to make informed decisions.

Is there any justice in the UK regulator’s decision?

There had been an “outpouring of anxiety” from frontline workers who were breastfeeding, with many feeling they had been “put in an impossible and discriminatory position because of the UK regulator’s decision”.

Joeli Brearley, founder of Pregnant Then Screwed, said some breastfeeding women had already been refused the vaccination. “Women are being forced into the position of giving up breastfeeding, giving up their career or putting themselves in grave danger, all because they are not considered a priority by drug companies or the regulators.”

Bottom line

The bottom line is no one knows the effects the covid-29 vaccine will have on the breastfeeding population. However, providing the breastfeeding woman with informed choices is key in giving them the power to choose. The choices can be hard either way. Women globally have been faced with tough decisions to make that are crucial to their future. Thank you for stopping by today. I hope you learned something. The Corona virus is very new to our world. We are still trying to understand this phenomena. I encourage you to ask God for His wisdom in helping you to make the best choice. (Paid link).


SIGN UP TODAY FOR YOUR BREASTFEEDING GUIDE

https://exciting-producer-2227.ck.page/279fc868d9

OR SIGN UP TODAY FOR HOW TO HAVE THE BEST PREGNANCY EVER!!

https://exciting-producer-2227.ck.page/d386076124
– Mother’s Lounge – For all of your Baby Needs

HERE IS YOUR FREE PROMOCODE (FOR ANY PURCHASE) TO GET YOUR GIFT OF 10 PAIRS OF BREAST PADS– Mother’s Lounge – For all of your Baby Needs CONGRATULATIONS!!! & Enjoy

Breastfeeding And Tongue Tie: Overcoming the Challenges


Tongue tie

Tongue tie can make it harder for babies to breastfeed (and sometimes bottle feed). It’s when the strip of tissue, called the ‘frenulum’ (attaching the tongue to the floor of the mouth) is shorter than normal. Tongue tie can prevent your baby from latching on properly – which can then lead to sore or cracked nipples.

Symptoms

Tongue tie can cause breastfeeding issues

Tongue tie is a condition no mother, especially a breastfeeding mother! No mother wants her baby to have this condition because it can cause issues for breastfeeding. It can even affect a child’s self esteem because it can make them talk a certain way that could be embarrassing. . Cases of tongue tie can range from mild to severe. If severe, the tongue may be completely fused to the floor of the mouth. You may be able to see if your newborn or baby has tongue tie by looking into their mouth when they’re yawning or crying, although it’s not always easy to spot. Signs of tongue tie in your baby might include:

  • your baby’s tongue doesn’t lift or move from side-to-side
  • their tongue may look heart-shaped when they stick it out
  • difficulty breastfeeding or bottle feeding (and weight gain may be slow)
  • frequent, long periods of feeding – but they seem unsettled and unsatisfied

There are many signs that a baby is having problems with breastfeeding and they may be related to tongue-tie:

  • nipple pain and damage
  • the nipple looks flattened after breastfeeding
  • you can see a compression/stripe mark on the nipple at the end of a breastfeed
  • the baby fails to gain weight well

You won’t necessarily have all these signs when you are having a problem and they can all be related to other breastfeeding problems and not necessarily related to tongue-tie. If you experience any of the signs above, you may wish to call the National Breastfeeding Helpline to speak with a breastfeeding counsellor or consider contacting a lactation consultant.

Can tongue tie affect breastfeeding?

Absolutely yes! Tongue-tie and breastfeeding. In some cases the tongue is not free or mobile enough for the baby to attach properly to the breast. Tongue-tie occurs in 4-11% of newborns and is more common in males. Some babies with tongue-tie are able to attach to the breast and suck well. However, many have breastfeeding problems, such as nipple damage.

A baby needs to be able to have good tongue function to be able to remove milk from the breast well. If the tongue is anchored to the floor of the mouth due to a tongue -tie, the baby cannot do this as well. The baby may not be able to take in a full mouthful of breast tissue. This can result in ‘nipple-feeding’ because the nipple is not drawn far enough back in the baby’s mouth and constantly rubs against the baby’s hard palate as he feeds. As a result, the mother is likely to suffer nipple trauma.

How does tongue tie affect breastfeeding mums?

However, many have breastfeeding problems, such as nipple damage, poor milk transfer and low weight gains in the baby, and possibly blocked ducts or mastitis due to ineffective milk removal. Why is a tongue-tie a problem for breastfeeding? A baby needs to be able to have good tongue function to be able to remove milk from the breast well.

  • your milk supply may reduce, as your baby is not latching on and feeding well
  • you may have sore or cracked nipples, which can make breastfeeding painful
  • poor latching on and ineffective feeding may lead to engorged breasts – which can then lead to mastitis

Not all babies with tongue tie have no problems at all. They may still be able to latch on and feed well – so not every case of tongue tie needs treatment.

If your baby does have tongue tie, it will hopefully be picked up in the first routine check by your midwife. However, tongue tie is not always easy to spot and may be discovered at a later stage (usually after feeding issues become apparent).

Diagnosis And Treatment

A website or virtual breastfeeding forum can’t diagnose a tongue-tie, your baby needs a face-to-face consultation with a specialist. A good place to start is by seeing an IBCLC lactation consultant who will take a full breastfeeding history—and assess both breastfeeding and tongue function. Your pediatrician can also diagnose tie tongue. Surgery is sometimes necessary.

If treatment is necessary, your baby will have a straightforward procedure called a ‘frenulotomy’. This is carried out by specially trained doctors, nurses or midwives – and is very quick (it takes a few seconds). Generally, no anaesthetic is used. The surgery simply involves snipping the short, tight piece of skin connecting the underside of the tongue to the floor of the mouth. As soon as it’s done, you can feed your baby (which helps to heal any bleeding).

Bottom Line

Tongue tie can certainly affect breastfeeding, making it harder for mothers to breastfeed. We know that no mother wants to discover that her newborn baby is tongue tied. Knowing the signs is the key to helping your baby to be diagnosed with the condition. There are varying degrees of tie tongue. Depending on the severity , surgery may be needed. I hope that you learned something today that will help you. Thank you for stopping by and do come again. Please like, or comment this post if you really like it and share. This website contains affiliate links, which means I earn a small commission  from products and services you purchase through my links at no extra cause to you.


HERE IS YOUR FREE PROMOCODE TO GET YOUR GIFT OF 10 PAIRS OF BREAST PADS– Mother’s Lounge – For all of your Baby Needs CONGRATULATIONS!!! & Enjoy

FREE EBOOK FOR THE BEST PREGNANCY EVER SIGN UP NOW!!!! ENJOY!! https://exciting-producer-2227.ck.page/d386076124    

Learn how to make your pregnancy the best ever

Breastfeeding And Diaper Rash: Powerful and Easy Solutions To Avoid It


You hear your baby crying hysterically, and you run to his rescue only to find that while changing his dirty nappy, he has a reddened rash on the buttocks.

Produced By Marilyn Smith- The # 1 midwife

Your baby looks at you and cries the sign of relief that “I’m safe now ,my mommy is here.” This is the exact scenario I experienced with my baby. Hello Mamas! today we are going to learn about diaper rash and breastfeeding with easy solutions to avoid it.

I want to encourage all the breastfeeding Mamas to breastfeed your child for as long as you can because diaper rash occurs less often in breastfed babies, although it isn’t completely clear why. (Paid link)

This site contains affiliate links. As an affiliate I earn a small commission if you make a purchase through my links. Your consideration would be greatly appreciated.

Diaper rash is characterized by bright red, inflamed skin on a baby’s bottom. Most parents attribute it to environmental factors, such as sensitivity to dyes or perfumes, infrequently changed diapers, and chafing. But did you know that itching and inflammation could actually be caused from something in your little one’s diet? Doctor Latanya Benjamin, M.D., clinical assistant professor of pediatrics and clinical assistant of dermatology at Stanford University Hospital in Palo Alto, California believes.

The Top Foods That Cause Diaper Rash

Citrus fruits and juices: These items are very acidic, which can be tough on Baby’s digestive system. Things to avoid include oranges, lemons, limes, grapefruits, and juices made from any type of citrus. 

Tomatoes and tomato-based products: Tomatoes are another highly acidic ingredient that can exaggerate symptoms of diaper rash. Your baby should also avoid spaghetti sauce, tomato soup, ketchup, and anything else that has a tomato base. 

Strawberries: Even though strawberries have a pleasing flavor, the acidity of the fruit can irritate your baby’s digestive system.

Pineapples and other tart fruits: Just because pineapple is acidic doesn’t mean your little star needs to avoid all tropical fruit. Consider trying mango or papaya instead.

What’s more, if your baby has frequent loose stools, she might develop diaper rash. It’s smart, then, to also avoid common diarrhea triggers such as dairy, fruit juice, peaches, plums, prunes, and more. My recommendation is to start with one fruit per week, instead of trying too many fruits at one time. By trying it one by one you can more easily define the culprit causing the diarrhea!

Conquering Diaper Rash Through Diet

Many babies are fed plenty of new foods when they start solids, which makes it hard to discern exactly what’s causing the negative reaction. Here’s a solution: Introduce new foods one at a time, then watch your baby for three to four days as her digestive system adapts.

If you notice any negative reaction to the food, such as diaper rash, she might have a sensitivity. Consult your doctor regarding next steps; if the reaction is small, he might suggest re-introducing the food at a later date.

If your baby does develop diaper rash, feed her starchy foods that digest easily. Reliable options include pasta, bread, rice, whole grain cereal, and crackers. These will ward of diarrhea (which makes diaper rash worse) and bulk up your baby’s stool. (Paid link)

 

What Are Some Of The Other Causes Of Diaper Rash?

Now lets not think that diaper rash is only caused by food. Diaper rash can be caused by anything from your child’s own urine to a new food. Here are the most likely causes:

Although a child left in a wet or soiled diaper for too long is more likely to develop diaper rash, any child with sensitive skin can get a rash, even if you’re diligent about diaper changes.

  • Antibiotics. Children taking antibiotics (or children whose breastfeeding mothers are on antibiotics) sometimes get yeast infections because these drugs kill the healthy bacteria that keep yeast in check as well as the harmful bacteria that’s causing the illness. Antibiotics can also cause diarrhea, which can contribute to diaper rash.
  • New foods. We just read this one. Diaper rash is also common when your child first starts eating solid foods or tries a new food. Any new food changes the composition of the stool, but the acids in certain foods (such as strawberries and fruit juices) can be especially troublesome for some kids. A new food also might increase the frequency of your child’s bowel movements. If you’re breastfeeding, your child could even be having a reaction to something you ate (although breastfed children are usually less likely to get a diaper rash).
  • Bacterial or yeast infection. The diaper area is warm and moist – just the way bacteria and yeast like it. So it’s easy for a bacterial or yeast infection to flourish there and cause a rash, especially in the cracks and folds of your child’s skin. (Thrush is a type of oral yeast infection. Some children with thrush develop a yeast infection in their diaper area, too.)
  • Wetness. Even the most absorbent diaper leaves some moisture on your child’s skin. And when your child’s urine mixes with bacteria from his stool, it breaks down into ammonia, which can be very harsh on the skin. That’s why children with frequent bowel movements or diarrhea are more prone to diaper rash.
  • Chafing and chemical sensitivity. Your child’s diaper rash may be the result of his diaper rubbing against his skin, especially if he’s sensitive to chemicals, like the fragrances in a disposable diaper or the laundry detergent used to wash a cloth diaper. It could also be that a product you’re using during diaper changes irritates your child’s skin.
  • sensitivity to baby wipes
  • colon bacteria imbalance
  • cloth diaper sensitivities (to detergents or materials in cloth diapers). (Paid link).

When Should I Seek Medical Attention For Diaper Rash?

Normally with some monitoring, you should be able to clear your child’s rash in three or four days without a visit to the doctor. But do see the doctor if the rash looks as though it may be infected.

A diaper rash can be caused by a yeast or bacterial infection or other conditions, you should get your doctor to take a look at the rash if it has persisted for longer than a week. Signs of infection include:

  • Blisters
  • Pus-filled pimples
  • Oozing yellow patches
  • Open sores

The doctor may prescribe a topical or oral antibiotic for your child.

For a diaper rash caused by a yeast infection, your child’s doctor may recommend an over-the-counter or prescription antifungal cream or ointment.

Also call the doctor if your child develops a fever or her rash doesn’t go away after several days of home treatment. The normal body temperature of a baby is anything between a Fahrenheit temperature of 97 degrees and 100.4 degrees. One way you can tell if your baby has a temperature is by touching or kissing his/her forehead. If the child feels hotter than usual, it’s probably because he/she has a fever.(Paid link).

Best Tips For Treating Your Little Star’s Diaper Rash

Photo by Polina Tankilevitch on Pexels.com

If diaper rash develops, take these steps to heal your child’s skin:

  • Dryness– Keep your child clean and dry by changing his diaper frequently. That may mean getting him up at night for a diaper change
  • Clean well– Rinse his diaper area well at each diaper change. Don’t use wipes that contain alcohol or fragrance. Some parents keep cotton balls and a squirt bottle or an insulated container of warm water at the changing table for easy, gentle cleanups.
  • Pat dry -Pat your child’s skin dry. Don’t rub!
  • Use barrier protection – Use an ointment that forms a barrier on the skin to protect your child’s irritated skin from stool and urine. You don’t have to use ointment at each diaper change: Apply a layer that’s thick enough to last through a couple diaper changes. This helps prevent further skin irritation from too much rubbing. There are several good barrier ointments available that include petroleum jelly or zinc oxide.
  • Loose fitting is key -Put your child’s diaper on loosely, or use a diaper that’s a little big on him to allow for better air circulation. If you buy disposables, try a different brand to see if that helps. There are varieties for sensitive skin, for example, and extra-absorbent options pull more moisture away from your child’s skin.
  • Air exposure is great– When the weather is warm and your child can play outside, leave his diaper (and ointment) off for as long as possible every day. Exposure to the air will speed healing.
  • Consider letting your child sleep with a bare bottom whenever he has a rash. A plastic sheet under the cloth one helps protect the mattress.

How Can I Keep Diaper Rash At Bay?

Here are some good preventive measures to keep diaper rash at bay:

  • Always remember- dry bottom is the best defense against diaper rash, so change your child’s diaper frequently or as soon as possible after it becomes wet or soiled.
  • Clean your child’s genital area thoroughly with each diaper change.
  • Pat her skin dry – never rub it. You can also use a hair dryer set on low to dry the diaper area after a diaper change.
  • If your child seems prone to diaper rash, spread a thin layer of protective ointment on her bottom after each diaper change.
  • Don’t use powders or cornstarch because the particles can be harmful to a child’s lungs if inhaled. Also, some experts think cornstarch can make a yeast diaper rash worse.
  • When your child starts eating solid foods, introduce one item at a time. Waiting a few days between each new food makes it easier to determine whether a sensitivity to a new food is causing diaper rash. If it is, eliminate that food for the time being.
  • Don’t secure the diaper so tightly that there’s no room for air to circulate. Dress her in loose clothing.
  • Use fragrance-free detergent to wash cloth diapers, and skip the fabric softener – both can irritate your child’s skin.
  • Wash diapers with hot water, and double rinse them. You also might add a half cup of vinegar to the first rinse to eliminate alkaline irritants.
  • Breastfeed your child for as long as you can because diaper rash occurs less often in breastfed babies, although it isn’t completely clear why.
  • When your child does need to take an antibiotic, ask the doctor about giving her a probiotic as well. Probiotics encourage the growth of healthy bacteria in the gut, which may reduce your child’s chances of getting a diaper rash.
  • If your child goes to daycare or preschool, make sure that her caregivers understand the importance of taking these precautions.

Bottom line

Diaper rash is quite common in babies wearing a diaper. It can have so many reasons for showing up in your baby. As a mom you should know what causes it and how to treat and prevent it. I have given you many tips and possible solutions to this condition. Never fail to see a healthcare provider if any condition is not improving.

Never use power to treat a nappy rash because it can make matters worse. I wish you every success in your breastfeeding journey. Always ask God to give you His wisdom in every situation. He loves you and He cares. Thank you for visiting and do come again. Please comment and like this article if you really do. This website contains affiliate links, which means I earn a small commission  from products and services you purchase through my links at no extra cause to you.

HERE IS YOUR FREE PROMOCODE TO USE ON ANY PURCHASED ITEM- M294429 – GET YOUR GIFT OF 10 PAIRS OF BREAST PADS– Mother’s Lounge – For all of your Baby Needs CONGRATULATIONS!!! & Enjoy


FREE EBOOK FOR THE BEST PREGNANCY EVER .

SIGN UP NOW!!!! ENJOY!! https://exciting-producer-2227.ck.page/d386076124    

How to Know If Your Baby Is Getting Enough Breast Milk


We all need confidence in knowing that our little stars are getting enough breast milk

Hello Mamas! and Dads! We all want to know that baby is getting enough breast milk don’t we? Of course we do . If the little star is not getting enough, we know that many things can go wrong .e.g. a very hungry, crying baby, sleepless nights for both parents and baby, a malnourished baby with possible hospitalization. It is easier to approximate how much a formula fed baby is getting better than a breastfed baby.

The good thing with the breastfed baby is this baby can be fed every time he wants to feed. This is called demand feed. Mamas the good news is the more baby sucks your breast, the more milk you make.

It may take a little while before you feel confident your baby is getting what they need.

“Your baby will generally let you know, but wet and dirty nappies are a good indication, as well as hearing your baby swallow,” says Zoe Ralph, an infant feeding worker in Manchester and Fellow of the Institute of Health Visiting.

Exclusive breastfeeding (breast milk only) is recommended for around the first 6 months of your baby’s life. Introducing bottle feeds will reduce the amount of breast milk you produce. So if you want your baby to get more breast milk you must give more of your breast milk. The less breastfeeding, the less milk your body will make.

A Great Latch Is A Must To Ensure That Your Baby Is Getting Enough

Breastfeeding your baby is one of the best things you can do to build up his immune system
  • Your baby has a wide mouth and a large mouthful of breast.
  • Your baby’s chin is touching your breast, their lower lip is rolled down (you can’t always see this) and their nose isn’t squashed against your breast.
  • You don’t feel any pain in your breasts or nipples when your baby is feeding, although the first few sucks may feel strong.
  • You can see more of the dark skin around your nipple (areola) above your baby’s top lip than below their bottom lip.
  • Your baby starts feeds with a few rapid sucks followed by long, rhythmic sucks and swallows with occasional pauses.
  • You can hear and see your baby swallowing.
  • Your baby’s cheeks stay rounded, not hollow, during sucking.
  • They seem calm and relaxed during feeds.
  • Your baby comes off the breast on their own at the end of feeds.
  • Their mouth looks moist after feeds.
  • Your baby appears content and satisfied after most feeds.
  • Your breasts feel softer after feeds.
  • Your nipple looks more or less the same after feeds – not flattened, pinched or white.
  • You may feel sleepy, thirsty, and relaxed after feeds.
  • Your newborn is latching on and breastfeeding on a schedule—at least every 2 to 3 hours,2 or 8 to 12 times each day.
  • You’re changing wet (urine) diapers. After the fifth day of life, your baby should be having at least 6 to 8 wet diapers per day.2
  • You can hear your little one swallowing while she’s breastfeeding, and you can see breast milk in her mouth.
  • After breastfeeding your breasts feel softer and not as full as they did before the feeding. 
  • Your child appears satisfied and content after nursing, and he sleeps between breastfeeding’s.

Watch Out For Your Baby’s Weight Gain

n the first few days of life, it is normal for a breastfed baby to lose up to 10% of his or her body weight.1 But, after the first few days, a consistent weight gain is the best way to confirm that your baby is getting enough nutrition.

What Should I Expect From My Baby’s Stools?

The first poop that your baby will pass is called meconium. It’s thick, sticky, and black or dark green. Newborns have at least one or two of these meconium stools a day for the first two days.3 Then, as the meconium passes out of your baby’s body, his bowel movements will turn greenish-yellow before they become a looser, mustard yellow breastfeeding stool that may or may not have milk curds called “seeds” in it.

What Are Growth Spurts?

Watch those growth spurts

Does your baby seem very fussy or easily irritated at times? If your answer is yes, your baby could be experiencing what we call growth spurts. If your baby has been breastfeeding well, and then all of a sudden seems to want to nurse all the time and appears less satisfied, it may not be a problem with your supply of breast milk. It may be a growth spurt.(Paid link).

All babies are unique and have growth spurts at different times. Some of the common times that newborns and infants may have a growth spurt are at approximately ten days, three weeks, six weeks, three months, and six months of age.4

During a growth spurt, a child breastfeeds more often. This increase in breastfeeding usually only lasts a few days. It’s needed to stimulate your body to make more breast milk to meet your baby’s growing nutritional needs.

During the first two months, your baby should be breastfeeding every two to three hours, even throughout the night. After two months, some babies will begin to have longer stretches between breastfeeding’s during the night.

Again, every baby is different, and while some babies will sleep through the night by three months of age, others may not sleep through the night for many months. The same sleep pattern is also true of formula-fed infants, and it is not an indicator that your baby is not getting enough breast milk.5

Keep Your Well Child Exam Visits And Seek Medical Assistance

You will see your baby’s pediatrician or healthcare provider within a few days of leaving the hospital to check your child’s weight, and make sure she’s breastfeeding well and getting enough breast milk. It’s very important to continue to see your baby’s doctor at regular intervals.

Here are some signs that your newborn may not be getting enough breast milk.

  • Your newborn is not breastfeeding well.
  • Your child is very sleepy and does not wake up for most feedings.
  • Your little one has pink, red, or very dark yellow concentrated urine or less than six wet diapers a day after the fifth day of life.
  • Your baby is crying, sucking, and showing signs of hunger even with frequent breastfeeding.

Speak to your doctor or a lactation consultant as soon as possible to have the baby examined and your breastfeeding technique checked. The sooner you get help for any difficulties that may arise, the easier it will be to correct the problems and get breastfeeding back on the right track.

Bottom line

We know that every parent wants to know for sure that her baby is getting enough milk. It is important for you to ensure that your baby is properly latched on . You must also be aware that growth spurts are real and you should not give formula if you are exclusively breastfeeding. All you need to do is continue to breastfeed. Also you should observe your baby’s diapers, knowing what is normal and what is not. Being aware of warning signs of when to visit your pediatrician. I wish you every success. I hope you have learned something to help you to know when your baby is full. Thank you for stopping by today and do come again. Please like, comment or ask a question below. This website contains affiliate links, which means I earn a small commission from products and services you purchase through my links at no extra cause to you


FOR YOUR FREE EBOOK FOR THE BEST PREGNANCY EVER SIGN UP NOW!!!! ENJOY!! https://exciting-producer-2227.ck.page/d386076124    

HERE IS YOUR FREE PROMOCODE TO GET YOUR GIFT OF 10 PAIRS OF BREAST PADS– Mother’s Lounge – For all of your Baby Needs CONGRATULATIONS!!! & Enjoy

USE THE PROMOCODE M294429 WHEN PURCHASING PRODUCTS

How To Stay Calm While Calming your Fussy Baby : 12 Steps to Getting Positive Results


Finding what works for you and your baby are keys in calming your little star

There is nothing in the world like a calm comfortable baby and new mom. Do you agree? Sometimes my babies cried so much that when they finally fell asleep, I would find myself whispering and asking the rest of the family to please be as quiet as possible because baby was sleeping.

A fussy baby can be overwhelming and leave you as anew mom drained and also sleep deprived. Getting to the root of the problem and finding ways that work are the key to better sleep for mom and baby.

Do you know what I mean mommy? Today we are going to learn simple amazing tips how to stay calm as a mother when your baby is fussy. Yes I am going to give you good tips that worked for me. It may take a few tries, but with patience and practice you’ll find out what works and what doesn’t for your baby. I hope they work also for you.

Did you know that your baby came from a noisy environment?

Babies in utero are rocked and swayed. They’re bombarded with the whooshing and gurgling sounds of their mother’s body and cradled by the walls of their “room.” No wonder, Karp says, they feel insecure and unhappy when lying alone in a quiet nursery, their arms and legs loose and flailing.(Paid link)

“Most babies doze much better when surrounded by some of the soothing sensations they enjoyed in the womb. These sensations work so well because they turn on a calming reflex – an off-switch for crying and on-switch for sleep that all babies are born with.”

Here are some simple, effective ways to get your baby to sleep

Mamas I know what you are talking about! I have been there! Try these steps. Some may or may not work . I think they are worth a try.

  • Swaddle your baby in a large, thin blanket (ask your nurse or child’s doctor to show you how to do it correctly) to help her feel secure.
  • Hold your baby in your arms and place her body on her left side to help digestion or stomach for support. Gently rub her back. If your baby goes to sleep, remember to always lay her down in her crib on her back.
  • Turn on a calming sound. Sounds that remind babies of being inside the womb may be calming, such as a white noise device, the humming sound of a fan, or the recording of a heartbeat.
  • Walk your baby in a body carrier or rock her. Calming motions remind babies of movements they felt in the womb.
  • Avoid overfeeding your baby because this may also make her uncomfortable. Try to wait at least 2 to 2½ hours from the beginning of one feeding to the next.
  • If it is not yet time to feed your baby, offer the breast or pacifier if breastfeeding is established. Many babies are calmed by sucking.
  • If food sensitivity is the cause of discomfort, a change in diet may help.
    • For breastfed babies: Moms may try changing their own diet. See if your baby gets less fussy if you cut down on milk ­products or caffeine. If there is no ­difference after making the dietary changes, resume your usual diet. Avoiding spicy or gassy foods like onions or ­cabbage has worked for some moms, but this has not been ­scientifically proven.
    • For bottle-fed babies: Ask your child’s ­doctor if you should try a different for­mula. This has been shown to be helpful for some babies.
  • Keep a diary of when your baby is awake, asleep, eating, and crying. Write down how long it takes your baby to eat or if your baby cries the most after eating. Talk with your child’s doctor about these behaviors to see if her crying is related to sleeping or eating.
  • Limit each daytime nap to no longer than 3 hours a day. Keep your baby calm and quiet when you feed or change her during the night by avoiding bright lights and noises, such as the TV.(Paid link)

How do I swaddle a baby?

  • Lay a blanket on a flat surface like a diamond and fold down the top corner about 6 inches to form a straight edge.
  • Place your baby on his back so that the top of the fabric is at shoulder level.
  • Bring your baby’s left arm down. Pull the corner of the blanket near his left hand over his arm and chest, and tuck the leading edge under his back on his right side.
  • Bring your baby’s right arm down. Pull the corner of the blanket near his right hand over his arm and chest, and tuck the cloth under his left side.
  • Twist or fold the bottom end of the blanket and tuck it loosely behind your baby, making sure that both legs are bent up and out from his body, his hips can move, and his legs can spread apart naturally.

12 Strategies To Keep Yourself Calm When Your Baby Is Fussy

Keeping yourself calm when your baby is fussy is one of the best things you can do

If you have tried to calm your crying baby but nothing seems to work, you may need to take a moment for yourself. Crying can be tough to handle, especially if you’re physically tired and mentally exhausted.

  • Take a deep breath and count to 10.
  • Place your baby in a safe place, such as crib or playpen without blankets and stuffed animals; leave the room; and let your baby cry alone for about 10 to 15 minutes.
  • While your baby is in a safe place, consider some actions that may help calm you down.
  • Listen to music for a few minutes.
  • Call a friend or family member for ­emotional support.
  • Do simple household chores, such as vacuuming or washing the dishes.
  • If you have not calmed after 10 to 15 minutes, check on your baby but do not pick up your baby until you feel you have calmed down.
  • Determine if your baby has a fever. If over 100 there is cause for concern.
  • Make sure your baby is not clad with too many clothes
  • Check your baby’s diaper. Babies hate soiled diapers.
  • When you have calmed down, go back and pick up your baby. If your baby is still crying, retry soothing measures.
  • Call your child’s doctor. There may be a medical reason why your baby is crying.
  • Try to be patient. Keeping your baby safe is the most important thing you can do. It is normal to feel upset, frustrated, or even angry, but it is important to keep your behavior under control. Remember, it is never safe to shake, throw, hit, slam, or jerk any child—and it never solves the problem!

Bottom line

All babies at some point in their growth will become fussy and irritable. Knowing how to handle these times is important to prevent you from getting burnout. Calming your baby can happen in many ways. I hope you never get burn out and find a solution to calming your baby. Remember God loves you and He cares. Ask Him to give you the wisdom you need to taking care of your little star. If you have a topic you would like for me to talk about, let me know below. This website contains affiliate links, which means I earn a small commission from products and services you purchase through my links at no extra cause to you.

SIGN UP FOR YOUR FREE eBook- THE BEST PREGNANCY EVER @https://exciting-producer-2227.ck.page/d386076124

HERE IS YOUR FREE PROMOCODE TO GET YOUR GIFT OF 10 PAIRS OF BREAST PADS– Mother’s Lounge – For all of your Baby Needs CONGRATULATIONS!!! & Enjoy

Use the CODE M294429 FOR ANY PRODUCT

Breastfeeding And Your Period: Understanding What Happens


Many new moms wonder when they will see their period. I was one of them.

Your period is connected to fertility, pregnancy, and even breastfeeding. Missing a period is one of the first signs of pregnancy, and while you’re pregnant, the hormones in your body keep your period away.

Then, if you decide to breastfeed, your period may stay away for weeks, months, or longer. So, when should you expect your period to return and how will menstruation affect breastfeeding and your baby?

You may have many questions about what to expect once your baby is born. Here’s what you need to know about breastfeeding and your period.

There are so many questions surrounding breastfeeding and periods, with so much info out there it is hard to know when will your period come back while breastfeeding. Every woman’s body is different and every breastfeeding journey is unique.

Lets begin with after the birth of the baby. 

After birth , certain conditions make it possible for you to see your period

The bleeding that you’ll have right after your baby is born may seem like a period, but that’s not actually what it is. It’s called lochia, and it’s a mixture of blood, mucus, and tissue from the lining of your uterus. Lochia starts out as bright red bleeding. It can be very heavy, and it may contain blood clots.

When do I see my period after my baby is born?

Breastfeeding could hold off your period longer. However, even if you do breastfeed, you could get your period back right away. You are more likely to get your period back sooner if:https://277810b69f2d58b215ad5b2cdea0fc8d.safeframe.googlesyndication.com/safeframe/1-0-37/html/container.html

Your Period and Breastfeeding: Here’s what happens

Breastfeeding after seeing your period is ok

When your period does return, it doesn’t mean you have to wean your baby. Breastfeeding while you have your period is perfectly safe. It’s not harmful to you or your child at all. There is no set time as to when your period will come back after delivery. Certain conditions will give certain results. Each woman is different.

Your breast milk is still healthy and nutritious for your baby. However, hormone changes in the days leading up to your period can affect your breast milk and your baby’s breastfeeding pattern for a few days.

You may not notice any difference in breastfeeding when your period returns. And, even if there are some changes, your baby may not mind and continue to breastfeed as usual.

It’s also possible that the return of your period can cause nipple tenderness, a dip in your breast milk supply, and for the taste of your breast milk to change.

https://amzn.to/3mVr2XZ

Research shows that the composition of breast milk changes around ovulation (mid-cycle).3 The levels of sodium and chloride in the milk go up while lactose (milk sugar) and potassium go down. So, the breast milk becomes saltier and less sweet during this time. 

Also around the time of ovulation and just before the start of your period, estrogen and progesterone levels change which can affect your breasts and your breast milk. When estrogen and progesterone levels go up, it can make your breasts feel full and tender.

Higher estrogen levels can also interfere with milk production. Studies also show that calcium levels in the blood go down after ovulation.4 The lower level of calcium may also contribute to sore nipples and a drop in the milk supply.

Here Is The Reason Why You Have No Period While Breastfeeding 

Breastfeeding can put off the return of your menstrual cycle for many months, a year, or even longer. The reason why many women do not get a period is that your body does not release hormones in your body that prepare you for a new pregnancy. It depends on your body and how often and how long you decide to breastfeed. Your period may stay away longer if you:

  • Breastfeed exclusively
  • Nurse both day and night
  • Keep your baby close to you by baby-wearing and co-sleeping
  • Avoid giving your child a bottle or a pacifier
  • Refrain from supplementing with formula or water
  • Hold off on starting solid foods until your little one is four to six months old

Once you are breastfeeding less often such as when your baby is sleeping through the night or you begin weaning, your period is more likely to start up again. Although, some women don’t get their period for a few months after breastfeeding has completely ended. When it finally shows up, breastfeeding more often will not get it to stop again.

Remember pumping or expressing breast milk by hand does not have the same effect on your body as breastfeeding does. If you choose to pump and bottle feed your baby, it will not hold off your period.( Paid link)

Period Return Equals- Fertility Is Here Again

When your period returns, you should consider yourself fertile.6 If you’re not ready to have another baby right away, you may want to look into birth control.

Your doctor will most likely talk to you about your birth control options during your first postpartum doctor visit at approximately four to six weeks after your baby is born. If not, bring it up and be sure to tell her that you’re breastfeeding since some types of birth control can interfere with your supply of breast milk.

Getting Pregnant Before Your Period Returns

Always remember that you can get pregnant before seeing your period

You can release an egg from your ovary (ovulate) before your period returns. Therefore, there is a chance that you can become pregnant while you’re breastfeeding even before your period comes back.

So, if you’re involved in an intimate relationship, and you’re not using birth control, it is possible to find yourself expecting again without ever getting your first postpartum period.

Breast Tenderness During Period

Take care of breastfeeding issues as soon as possible
Make sure to consult your lactation specialist for any issues with breastfeeding issues

It’s not uncommon to experience sore nipples when you get your period. So, for a few days before your period starts, it may be a little uncomfortable to breastfeed. Here are some tips to help you deal with nipple tenderness. (Paid link)

  • Try not to let the pain prevent you from breastfeeding, if possible.
  • Practice skin to skin and continue to put the baby to the breast so you can maintain your milk supply and prevent other breastfeeding problems such as breast engorgementnipple blebsplugged milk ducts, and mastitis.
  • Avoid using a numbing cream to try to relieve the pain. These products can numb your baby’s mouth and interfere with the let-down of your breast milk
  • Ask your doctor if it’s safe for you to use an over-the-counter pain reliever for the few days it hurts.
  • Pump your breast milk, if it’s too painful and you just cannot breastfeed. Pumping will help you keep up your milk supply while you’re waiting for the tenderness to pass. It also allows you to continue to give your baby your breast milk.

How to increase Your Milk Supply

The decrease in your milk supply related to your period is usually temporary. You may notice the dip during the few days before your period arrives. Then, once you get your period, your supply should begin to increase again as the hormones balance out. To combat a low breast milk supply during your period you can:5

  • Try to build up your breast milk supply naturally.
  • Use an herbal breastfeeding tea or another galactagogue to help boost your milk production.
  • Eat a well-balanced diet with iron-rich foods (red meat, leafy greens) and milk-making superfoods (oatmeal, almonds, fennel).
  • Drink plenty of fluids.
  • Try a combination of calcium and magnesium supplements such as 1000mg of calcium taken with 500mg of magnesium before and during your period.
  • Talk to your doctor, a lactation consultant, or a local breastfeeding group for more information and helpful advice.
  • Observe your baby’s soiled nappies.

If your milk supply drops too low, it could be dangerous for your baby. So, you should also:

Bottom line

Breastfeeding can affect your period, and your period can affect breastfeeding, your breast milk, and your baby. While many women do not notice any changes when their period returns, some women experience inconvenient or concerning issues.

It is so good to know that the most common breastfeeding problems that result from the return of your period are temporary. Of course, you may decide that the sore nipples and extra work it takes to keep up your milk supply are just too much. While it’s still safe and beneficial to breastfeed when you have your period, some moms choose to wean once their period returns.

It may even be easier if the baby is breastfeeding less due a lower breast milk supply and change in the flavor of the milk. While it’s true that the longer you can breastfeed, the better it is for you and your child, it’s really up to you and what works best for your family. Thank you for stopping by today. I hope you learned something. Do visit again and know that God loves you. Ask Him to help you as you go through your challenges through out life. I wish you every success in your breastfeeding journey. Leave a comment below, I would love to hear from you. .Just so you know, Breast Fed Is Best Academy may earn commissions from shopping links.

FREE EBOOK FOR THE BEST PREGNANCY EVER SIGN UP NOW!!!! ENJOY!! https://exciting-producer-2227.ck.page/d386076124  

  

HERE IS YOUR FREE PROMOCODE TO GET YOUR GIFT OF 10 PAIRS OF BREAST PADS– Mother’s Lounge – For all of your Baby Needs

Foods To Eat And Avoid While Breastfeeding


Breast milk contains everything a baby needs for the first 6 months of life. Additionally, the fat and calorie content of breast milk changes both during a feeding and over time to accommodate your baby’s needs

Did you know that breast milk is chock-full of nourishing nutrients and protective compounds that are essential for your baby’s development. This is why breast milk is known as the “gold standard” for infant nutrition and is often referred to as liquid gold.”

Not surprisingly, it takes a lot of energy to produce this liquid gold and your needs for many nutrients increase to meet these demands.

It’s so, so important to choose nutrient-dense, nourishing foods to support your breast milk production. Plus, eating healthy foods postpartum can help you feel better both mentally and physically — and who doesn’t want that?

This article explains everything you need to know about eating a healthy diet while breastfeeding. Breastfeeding may help reduceTrusted Source your risk of developing certain medical conditions later in life, including heart disease and diabetes. It may also relieve stress and help you feel more connected to your new baby.

Learn the good benefits of breastmilk

Mama you may be wondering why it’s so important that you follow a heathy, nutrient-dense diet while breastfeeding.

In addition to promoting your overall health, a healthy diet is essential for ensuring that your baby is getting all the nutrients they need to develop.

With the exception of vitamin D, breast milk contains everything your baby needs for proper development during the first 6 months.

Vitamin D is key. It’s essential for healthy bones, for both you and your baby, and we get most of it from sun exposure. If you live somewhere that doesn’t have a lot of sunshine, especially during winter, your body may struggle to make enough vitamin D so supplements are recommended2 – your healthcare professional can advise you.

What foods should You avoid while breastfeeding?

Mamas there is good news, apart from limiting how much oily fish you eat, there aren’t any specific foods to avoid when breastfeeding your baby. Caffeine and alcohol are also fine, within sensible limits .

And unless you are allergic to peanuts yourself, there is no reason to avoid peanut-based foods while breastfeeding. In fact, the latest research suggests that if you eat peanuts while breastfeeding and introduce them to your infant’s diet within his first year, he is less likely to develop a sensitivity to them.4

Group 1 nutrients

Here are the group 1 nutrients and how to find them in some common food sources:

  • Vitamin B1 (Thiamin): fish, pork, seeds, nuts, beans
  • Vitamin B2 (Riboflavin): cheese, almonds, nuts, red meat, oily fish, eggs
  • Vitamin B6: chickpeas, nuts, fish, poultry, potatoes, bananas, dried fruit
  • Vitamin B12: shellfish, liver, yogurt, oily fish, nutritional yeast, eggs, crab, shrimp
  • Choline: eggs, beef liver, chicken liver, fish, peanuts
  • Vitamin A: sweet potatoes, carrots, dark leafy greens, organ meats, eggs
  • Vitamin D: cod liver oil, oily fish, some mushrooms, fortified foods
  • Selenium: Brazil nuts, seafood, turkey, whole wheat, seeds
  • Iodine: dried seaweed, cod, milk, iodized salt

Group 2 nutrients

Here are the group 2 nutrients and some common food sources:

  • Folate: beans, lentils, leafy greens, asparagus, avocados
  • Calcium: You should also ensure you’re getting enough calcium, as this is depleted when breastfeeding.3 Aim for four servings a day from dairy foods, such as milk, yoghurt and cheese, or non-dairy sources, including nuts, tofu, sesame seeds and leafy green vegetables. A serving could be half a cup of green veggies or a small 50 g (1.5 oz) piece of cheese. milk, yogurt, cheese, leafy greens, legumes
  • Iron: red meat, pork, poultry, seafood, beans, green vegetables, dried fruit
  • Copper: shellfish, whole grains, nuts, beans, organ meats, potatoes
  • Zinc: oysters, red meat, poultry, beans, nuts, dairy

But if your overall diet does not provide sufficient nutrients, it can affect both the quality of your breast milk and your own health. I really want you to have a good quality breast milk. This is what is going to give your baby the best in his developing stages.

ResearchTrusted Source shows that breast milk is made up of 87 percent water, 3.8 percent fat, 1.0 percent protein, and 7 percent carbohydrate and provides 60 to 75 kcal/100ml.

Unlike baby formula, the calorie content and composition of breast milk varies. Breast milk changes during each feeding and throughout your lactation period, in order to meet the needs of your baby.

At the beginning of a feeding, the milk is more watery and usually quenches the baby’s thirst. The milk that comes later (hindmilk) is thicker, higher in fat and more nutritious.

In fact according to an older 2005 studyTrusted Source, this milk may contain 2 to 3 times as much fat as milk from the beginning of a feeding, and 7 to 11 more calories per ounce. Therefore, to get to the most nutritious milk, it’s important that your baby empties one breast before switching to the other.

Supplements can add to your quality of nutrition

Taking certain supplements can help replenish your stores of certain vitamins and minerals.

There are a number of reasons why new moms may be low in certain nutrients, including not eating the right foods and the increased energy demands of breast milk production, along with looking after your baby.

Taking supplements can help boost your intake of important nutrients. But it’s important to be weary when choosing supplements, since many contain herbs and other additives that aren’t safe for breastfeeding moms.

A multivitamin can be a great choice for increasing your intake of important vitamins and minerals.

It’s common for women to be deficient in vitamins and minerals after delivery and researchTrusted Source shows that deficiencies don’t discriminate, affecting moms in both high- and low-income settings.

Vitamin B-12

Vitamin B-12 is a super important water-soluble vitamin that is essential for your baby’s health, as well as your own health, during breastfeeding.

Plus, many women — especially those following mostly plant-based dietsTrusted Source, those who’ve had gastric bypass surgeryTrusted Source, and women who are on certain medications (such as acid reflux drugs) — are already at an increased risk of having low B-12 levels.

If you fit into one of these categories, or if you feel that you don’t eat enough B-12 rich foods like fish, meat, poultry, eggs, and fortified foods, then taking a B-complex or B-12 supplement is a good idea.

Keep in mind that a most high-quality multivitamin and prenatal vitamins contain enough B-12 to cover your needs.

Omega-3 (DHA)

Omega-3 fats are all the rage nowadays, and for good reason. These fats, naturally found in fatty fish and algae, play essential roles in both maternal and fetal health.

For example, the omega-3 fat DHA is critical for the development of your baby’s nervous system, skin, and eyes. Plus, concentration of this important fat in breast milk largely depends on your intake levels.

What’s more, researchTrusted Source shows that babies who are fed breast milk with high levels of DHA have better vision and neurodevelopment outcomes.

Because breast milk concentrations of omega-3s reflect your intake of these important fats, it’s essential that you get enough. We recommend that nursing mothers take in 250 to 375 mg daily of DHA plus EPA, another important omega-3 fat.

Although eating 8 to 12 ounces of fish, especially fatty fish like salmon and sardines, can help you reach the recommended intake levelsTrusted Source, taking a fish oil or krill oil supplement is a convenient way to cover your daily needs.

Vitamin D

Vitamin D is only found in a few foods, like fatty fish, fish liver oils, and fortified products. Your body can also produce it from sunlight exposure, though it depends on many factors, like skin color and where you live.

ResearchTrusted Source shows that it plays many important roles in your body and is essential for immune function and bone health.

Vitamin D is usually only present in low amounts in breast milk, especially when sun exposure is limited.

Therefore, supplementing with 400 IU of vitamin D per day is recommended for breast-fed babies and babies consuming less than 1 liter of formula per day, starting during the first few days of life and continuing until they are 12 months of age, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics.

According to researchTrusted Source, supplementing with 6,400 IU daily can help supply your baby with adequate amounts of vitamin D through breast milk alone. Interestingly, this amount is much higher than the current recommended vitamin D intake of 600 IU for breastfeeding moms.

Vitamin D deficiency is extremely common amongst breastfeeding women. And deficiency can lead to negative health outcomes, including an increased riskTrusted Source of postpartum depression. That’s why supplementing with this vitamin is recommended.

Ask your healthcare provider for specific dosing recommendations based on your current vitamin D levels.

Drink plenty of water

While breastfeeding, you release oxytocin, which stimulates thirst. This natural biological process ensures that you drink enough water to meet your increased fluid needs.

In addition to being hungrier than usual while breastfeeding, you may feel thirstier as well.

When your baby latches onto your breast, your oxytocin levels increase. This causes your milk to start flowing. This also stimulates thirst and helps ensure that you stay properly hydrated while feeding your baby.

It’s important to note that your hydration needs will vary depending on factors like activity levels and dietary intake. There’s no one-size-fits-all rule when it comes to how much fluid you need during breastfeeding.

As a rule of thumb, you should always drink when you are thirsty and until you have quenched your thirst.

But if you feel very tired, faint, or as if your milk production is decreasing, you may need to drink more water. The best way to tell if you are drinking enough water is the color and smell of your urine.

If it is dark yellow and has a strong smell, that’s a sign that you’re dehydrated and need to<a href=”http://- <a href=”https://www.tkqlhce.com/click-100174660-14068999″&gt; <img src=”https://www.lduhtrp.net/image-100174660-14068999&#8243; width=”468″ height=”60″ alt=”” border=”0″/> drink more water.

Foods and drinks to avoid while breastfeeding

Although you may have heard otherwise, it’s safe to eat just about any food while breastfeeding, unless you have an allergy to a specific food.

And, although some flavors from food, spices or beverages may change the taste of your breast milk, researchTrusted Source shows it’s unlikely that this will impact your baby’s feeding time or make them fussy.

Another common misconception is that “gassy” foods like cauliflower and cabbage will cause gassiness in your baby, too. Although these foods may make you gassy, the gas-promoting compounds do not transfer to breast milk, per this 2017 researchTrusted Source.

In summary, most foods and drinks are safe during breastfeeding, but there are a few that should be limited or avoided. If you think something may be impacting your baby negatively, ask your healthcare provider for advice.

Caffeine

About 1 percentTrusted Source of the caffeine you consume is transferred to breast milk, and research says it takes babies much longer to metabolize caffeine. Drinking caffeinated beverages like coffee have not been shown to cause harm, but they may affect the baby’s sleep.

Therefore, it’s recommended that breastfeeding women limit their coffee intake to about 2 to 3 cups per day. It’s a bummer, we know, but at least some coffee is allowed, right?(Paid link)

Alcohol

The AAP suggests no more than 0.5 grams of alcohol per kilogram of body weight, which for a 60-kilogram (132-pound) mother, equals 2 ounces of liquor, 8 ounces of wine, or 2 beers.

Many breastfeeding mums choose to stop drinking alcohol. However, occasional light drinking while breastfeeding has not been shown to have any adverse effects on babies.8 Alcohol is best avoided until your baby is over three months old, though, and then enjoyed as an occasional treat, such as a small (125 ml/4.2 fl oz) glass of wine.

If you do have an alcoholic drink, make sure you allow at least a couple of hours (2) for the alcohol to go through your system before your next breastfeed.9 Alternatively, you could have a small drink while you’re actually breastfeeding your baby, as by the time the alcohol is in your system, he will have finished feeding. Or for total peace of mind, if you’re planning to have an alcoholic drink you could express and store milk beforehand and give that to your baby for his next feed.

Bear in mind that alcohol can temporarily reduce your milk yield,8 so if you do have a drink your baby may seem hungrier and want to feed more.

Although it’s perfectly find to enjoy an alcoholic beverage as a breastfeeding mom, it’s best to wait at least 2 hours after drinking to breastfeed your baby.

Cow’s milk

Although uncommon. Some babies may be allergic to cow’s milk. And if your baby has a cow’s milk allergy, it’s important that you exclude all dairy products from your diet.

Up to 1 percentTrusted Source of breastfed infants are allergic to cow’s milk protein from their mother’s diet, and may develop rashes, eczema, diarrhea, bloody stools, vomiting or baby colic.

Your healthcare provider can give you advice on how long to exclude dairy from your diet for, and when it’s safe to reintroduce dairy.

Breastfeeding and weight loss: Lets learn the facts

You might be tempted to lose weight quickly after delivery, but weight loss takes time and it’s important to be kind to your body during this transition. After having my babies, I hated to look at myself in the mirror. I wanted to loose my weight right away.As time went by I realize that the weight did not come one time therefore loosing it would not be that simple.

With the many hormonal changes that take place during breastfeeding and the calorie demands of making breast milk, you may have a bigger appetite during breastfeeding.

Restricting calories too much, especially during the first few months of breastfeeding, may decrease your milk supply and much-needed energy<a href=”http://- <a href=”https://www.tkqlhce.com/click-100174660-14068999″&gt; <img src=”https://www.lduhtrp.net/image-100174660-14068999&#8243; width=”468″ height=”60″ alt=”” border=”0″/> levels.(Paid link)

Fortunately, breastfeeding alone has been shownTrusted Source to promote weight loss, especially when continued for 6 months or longer. (That said, losing weight during breastfeeding doesn’t happen for everyone!)

Losing approximately 1.1 pounds (0.5 kilograms) per weekTrusted Source through a combination of a healthy diet and exercise should not affect your milk supply or milk composition, assuming that you are not undernourished to begin with.

All breastfeeding women, no matter their weight, should consume adequate calories. But if you’re underweight, it’s likely that you’ll be more sensitive to calorie restriction.

For this reason, it’s essential that women with less body weight consume more calories to avoid a reduction in milk supply.

All in all, remember that losing weight after delivery is a marathon, not a sprint. It took months to put on the weight for a healthy pregnancy for both you and your baby, and it may take you months to lose it — and that’s okay.

The most important thing to remember when trying to lose pregnancy weight is that restrictive diets are not good for overall health and don’t work for long-term weight loss.

Following a nutritious diet, adding exercise into your daily routine, and getting enough sleep are the best ways to promote healthy weight loss.

Bottom line

Breastfeeding is no doubt hard work! Your body requires more calories and nutrients to keep you and your baby nourished and healthy.

If you’re not eating enough calories or nutrient-rich foods, this can negatively affect the quality of your breast milk. It can also be detrimental for your own health.

It’s more important than ever to eat a variety of healthy, nutritious foods and limit processed foods. Avoid excess caffeine and alcohol consumption, and stick to the recommended intakes to keep your baby healthy. Thanks for stopping by today and I hope you are getting the results you need for your breastfeeding journey. I wish you every success. If you are a male I encourage you to support the woman in your life who is breastfeeding.

IF YOU ARE PREGNANT: SUBSCRIBE FOR YOUR EXCITING FREE EBOOK FOR THE BEST PREGNANCY EVER SIGN UP NOW!!!! ENJOY!!

https://exciting-producer-2227.ck.page/d386076124 &nbsp;

  

HERE IS YOUR FREE PROMOCODEs – M294429 & 551C29 TO GET YOUR GIFT OF 10 PAIRS OF BREAST PADS OR ANYTHING YOU WANT– Mother’s Lounge – For all of your Baby Needs CONGRATULATIONS!!! & Enjoy

How To Keep Your Sleepy Baby Awake While Breastfeeding: Best Tips For Great Results


 Breastfeeding provides more than nutrition to your little one. It’s bonding time, but breastfeeding difficulties can lead to worry and frustration

Breastfeeding can set the stage for falling asleep while breastfeeding. This can pose a problem with breastfeeding because they might not wake enough to take full feedings. Keeping them awake while breastfeeding is key to getting them to eat enough. .

The most common reasons a baby might fall asleep on the breast are they’re tired, overstimulated, or their tummy is nice and full.

Remember, feeding sessions should last about 20 minutes.

If they drift off around or beyond that time limit, you shouldn’t be concerned unless they’re showing signs of illness, weight loss, or dehydration.

Every mother wants to know that after a feed their little star is satisfied. Did you know that there is a reason for this :

According to a study, there’s a hormone released while breastfeeding called cholecystokinin (or CCK) that naturally makes them feel full and drowsy. And the younger the infant is, the higher the concentrations of CCK is released in their body.

The times are rough estimates because your milk flow sets your baby’s pace.

Slower flow can cause your baby to sleep, and you might need to manually manipulate your breast to increase it.

A faster flow can leave your baby satiated in less time, which then can lull them to sleep. Keep breast flow going with encouraging baby to always breastfeed at first while at the breast. Try breastfeeding both breasts first for at least 10 minutes and if baby still does not want it, give baby breastmilk or formula if not taking breast. Pump every 2-3 hours or 8times per day to keep stimulating breasts to make more milk.

Tips and tricks for keeping baby awake while breastfeeding

  • Wet a washcloth with lukewarm water and rub it on their face or along their hairline.
  • Do breast massages while feeding to encourage them to feed longer.
  • Run your fingers gently along their cheek or foot.
  • Switch breasts as soon as you notice baby stops actively suckling and begins to trail off.
  • Breastfeed in the “football” hold.
  • Walk your fingers up baby’s spine.
  • Tickle their lower lip to encourage them to latch.
  • Feed your baby as soon as they wake.
  • Unwrap the baby from their blanket.
  • Express some milk into their mouth.
  • Lay them down on a flat, firm surface.  
  • Bathe them.
  • Stroke your baby’s cheek if they’re latched but not actively nursing.
  • Move their arms and legs in a bicycling motion.
  • Talk to your baby!

After trying a few tips, express milk for your baby if they’re still not responding. You can use hand expression or your pump.  

Also, be sure to closely monitor their pee and poop output and weight gain to make sure they’re consistently getting enough to eat.

Mamas, observe your baby’s soiled nappies closely?

Mamas, it is important for you to observe your baby’s soiled diapers to determine if your little star is getting enough.

Keep track of your baby’s diapers. Mark how many pee and poop diapers you change each day.

Don’t worry too much about the poop consistency unless the stools are hard, dry, or difficult to pass.

Bowel frequency can vary too and depends on your baby’s age. Breastfed babies can produce one to six bowel movements a day.

If your baby produces more than 12 bowel movements, call your pediatrician.

Another concern is diarrhea, which could be a sign of an intolerance or allergy. Food allergies can cause excessive sleepiness in babies, children, and adults.

This makes it a cause and symptom to explain why your baby keeps drifting off.

Finding the culprit isn’t easy, but once you do, you’ll solve how to keep baby awake during breastfeeding with one small change.

Urination will occur more frequently, and you should expect at least six wet diapers a day. Any less could be a cause for concern.

It should not have a strong or offensive odor, and the color should be on the pale side. Dark urine can be a sign of dehydration.

Concerned that your little star is not gaining weight

  • After the first few weeks, your baby should gain about 6 ounces per week.
  • Don’t be alarmed if your baby is a little over or under as this is a rough estimate for exclusively breastfed babies.
  • Some babies grow slower or faster too, and your genetics do play a role.
  • Most weighing occurs at the doctor’s office. Your pediatrician will most likely show you your baby’s growth on a curving percentile chart.
  • They look at the curve and individual history more than the actual numbers since each child is different.
  • As long as you’re making your well visit checkups, your doctor should catch weight-related issues.
  • However, don’t hesitate to make an appointment if you notice your child isn’t nursing normally, having fewer stools and/or urine diapers, or visibly losing weight.

Are you concerned about your milk drying up?

I know this can be a concern for both you and your baby. Maybe your infant is sleeping more, and it’s temporary.

A dwindling milk supply that isn’t addressed quickly might force you to supplement formula.

Pumping is another alternative to supplementing. After your baby falls asleep, you pump what remains and store it properly.

This enables your body to continue producing an adequate supply and provides you with breast milk on demand should your baby need it.

More Best tips to keep baby awake while feeding

The change might be enough to stop them from sleeping. Try these tips to wake your baby if feeding sessions end before 20 minutes.

Change their Diaper:

Like above, when they show signs of sleepiness, or irritability get up and check their diaper.

Play Stimulating Music: This might not work for all babies.

Choose higher tempo music!

play at a comfortable but loud enough to keep your baby awake.

Change Feeding Position:

Some feeding techniques are more sleep-inducing than others are.

Try a laid-back approach.

Lay back on a couch, recliner, or in bed on your back. Place your baby so their tummy is on yours.

Break the Suction:

This can encourage a baby to suckle again. Simply use your finger to gently pry their mouth free.

Wipe Baby Down:

Using a dampened, warm washcloth, wipe down your baby from head to toe.

The cool air and stimulation might be enough to wake up your baby.

Give baby a bath can also help.

Swap Sides:

If you notice your baby drifting off, take the time to change them to your other breast.

Bottom line

Keeping your baby awake while breastfeeding can be a concern for you Mamas. I know. If none of the tips help you consider seeing your pediatrician to answer your concerns. Thank you for stopping by today and do visit again. Feel free to comment below. If you are a new mom or mom to be , accept my gift to you by checking out this link for :

YOUR ULTIMATE BREASTFEEDING GUIDE

https://exciting-producer-2227.ck.page/279fc868d9

How To Wake Your Sleeping Baby For Breastfeeding: Excellent Tips For Your Success


Many mothers have experienced sleepy babies while breastfeeding. I encourage you to observe your baby for signs of illnesses if it prolonged

I have seen it all! Yes I have seen so many new parents want to feed their breastfeeding babies, are afraid to wake them up to feed. Even the new dads are afraid to wake up their newborns. Its time for your baby to feed but you do not know how to wake baby up. Time for feeding is very important for breastfeeding or formula fed babies. Or you may be breastfeeding your baby and baby keeps falling asleep. I will help you out today by helping you to understand why this happens and some great tips on how you can get great results. Paid link)

WHY ARE NEWBORNS SO DROWSY DURING THE FIRST WEEK?

There are some reasons why babies are sleepy at the breast

When they’re very young, newborns and infants can be sleepy for many reasons, and it’s normal for your child to be drowsy for some of their feedings. Just after birth, your baby may be tired or still affected by the medications that you were given during labor and delivery. Plus, some newborns just like to sleep a lot. Medications for pain and sedation often cause this in newborns. Additionally, for some babies. the birth experience can also be a bit too much.

As the weeks go on, you will be able to let your child sleep for longer periods of time between feedings. At approximately two weeks of age, your baby may have one long stretch of sleep each day of up to five hours (at night, if you are lucky), where you don’t have to wake them for feeding.(Paid link).

After two months, your baby will most likely be able to sleep as much as they want between feedings. Just be sure they are breastfeeding about eight to 10 times a day and gaining weight well.

I had four babies and I never thought that a sleeping baby could be so hard at times to wake. While working in the hospital, I observed some mothers trying to breastfeed their sleeping babies. You know it never works. Let me give you some easy tips to help you along. Mamas and Dadas, you do not have to be afraid to touch your baby.

Tips to wake your little star for breastfeeding

There are many ways you can try to wake your baby up
  • Dim the lights: A baby’s eyes are sensitive to bright light. Little ones may be more likely to open their eyes and wake up in a darker room.
  • Practice skin to skin. Let baby immerse in the oxytocin limelight; looking at you, smelling your milk , and listening to your heartbeat. Practice as often as possible.
  • Put your baby to your breast: The natural rooting reflex that your baby is born with may get them eating even if they are sleepy. You can also try to express a few drops of your breast milk onto your baby’s mouth. The smell and taste of your breast milk may help to get your baby sucking.
  • Stroke your baby’s cheek: If you can get your child latched on but they still aren’t eating, stroke their cheek to help get them nursing.
  • Change breastfeeding positions: Moving your child to a different breastfeeding position might help to wake them up. Try the side-lying position, football hold, or laid-back nursing position.
  • Avoid using a pacifier: Using a pacifier can keep your child sleeping longer, and it can prevent you from realizing that your baby is hungry. While it’s OK for breastfed babies to use a pacifier, wait until the child is approximately 4 to 6 weeks old and breastfeeding is going well before introducing it.
  • Unwrap your baby: Remove your child’s blankets and even undress them so that they aren’t so warm and comfortable. However, keep in mind that babies lose body heat very quickly. So do not keep your child undressed in a cold room.
  • Change your baby’s diaper: The movement and feeling of a diaper change are often enough to get a baby up and ready to eat. (Paid link)
  • Grab a washcloth: Gently wipe your child’s face with a wet washcloth.
  • Try a bath: The feel of the water and the change in temperature might do the trick.
  • Burp your baby: Patting and rubbing your baby’s back can help to wake them up. Burping also removes any air trapped in your child’s stomach that may be making them feel full or uncomfortable (and not interested in eating).
  • Touch your baby: Ease your child out of their sleepy state by tickling their feet or gently rubbing their arms, legs, and back.
  • Talk to your child: Just hearing your voice might be enough to wake your baby.

When should I become concerned?

Anytime I had issues with my kids I also talked to God about it

Infant jaundice, illness, infections, or other issues can cause sleepiness in infants beyond what is normal. If you believe your baby is excessively sleepy, or you’re having trouble waking your baby for most feedings, notify your child’s pediatrician right away.

Bottom Line

The fact of the matter is some babies are hard to wake . We see that there are many reasons for this. Many new Mamas experience their babies being very hard to wake up when it is time to breastfeed. I have provided you with many tips to help you out. I hope something works for you and your little star. The first 15 minutes while feeding every mom should aim as much as possible to keep baby awake. This can be done by simply motivating baby , rubbing her hair, talking to her, play with her until her eyes open and reattach to the breast. Thanks for stopping by today and do visit again. If you had issues with waking your baby up please let me know what works for you.

HERE IS YOUR FREE PROMOCODE M294429 & 551C29 TO GET YOUR GIFT OF 10 PAIRS OF BREAST PADS– Mother’s Lounge – For all of your Baby Needs CONGRATULATIONS!!! & Enjoy. You may use the codes for any purchase.

Watch this video on tips on how to wake your baby for feeds @(19) Baby Sleeping While Breastfeeding-How to Keep Him Awake – YouTube

SIGN UP FOR YOUR FREE ULTIMATE GUIDE TO BREASTFEEDING :

https://exciting-producer-2227.ck.page/279fc868d9

Breastfeeding and Weaning: The Perfect Guide


Weaning is a term that is used to describe a child stopping from breastfeeding to feeding from a cup , bottle or solid food.

Many mothers think that weaning their child from breastfeeding is such a great task. No Mamas it is not. Lets find out how to choose the right time and what you can do to ease your child’s transition to the bottle or cup.

The Types of Weaning

There are multiple methods and types of weaning, pick the one that’s best for you and your baby:

  • Baby-led weaning: Sometimes a baby stops breastfeeding on his own. However, young infants rarely wean themselves. True self-weaning is usually gradual and happens after a child is a year old. 
  • Gradual weaning: Gradual weaning a slow weaning process. It takes place over weeks, months, or years.
  • Partial weaning: Partial weaning is a great alternative if you can’t breastfeed exclusively but you don’t want to give up on breastfeeding altogether.2
  • Sudden weaning: Sudden weaning is the quick end of breastfeeding.
  • Temporary weaning: Temporary weaning is when breastfeeding is stopped for a short period then restarted. A mother may temporarily wean her child if she has a health issue or needs surgery.2 (Paid link here).

When’s the best time to start weaning?

When to begin weaning is a personal choice

Sometimes it’s the mom who chooses when to start weaning, and sometimes the baby leads the process. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends exclusive breast-feeding for the first six months after birth — and breast-feeding in combination with solids foods until at least age 1. Breast-feeding is recommended as long as you and your baby wish to continue.

When to start weaning your child is a personal decision. It’s often easiest to begin weaning when your baby starts the process. Changes in breast-feeding patterns leading to eventual weaning often begin naturally at age 6 months, when solid foods are typically introduced. Some children begin to seek other forms of nutrition and comfort at around age 1. By this age, children typically eat a variety of solid foods and are able to drink from a cup. Other children might not initiate weaning until they become toddlers, when they’re less willing to sit still during breast-feeding.

You might also decide when to start the weaning process yourself. This might be more difficult than following your child’s lead — but can be done with extra care and sensitivity.

Whenever you start weaning your baby from the breast, focus on your child’s needs as well as your own. Resist comparing your situation with that of other families, and consider rethinking any deadlines you might have set for weaning when you were pregnant or when your baby was a newborn.

Is There Is A Time I Should Delay Weaning?

Consider NOT weaning your child if the environment is not right

Consider delaying weaning if:

  • You’re concerned about allergens. If you or your child’s father has food allergies, consider delaying weaning until after your child turns age 1. Research suggests that exposing a child to potential allergens while breast-feeding might decrease his or her risk of developing allergies. Talk to your child’s doctor.
  • Your child isn’t feeling well. If your child is ill or teething, postpone weaning until he or she feels better. You might also postpone weaning if you’re not feeling well. You’re both more likely to handle the transition well if you’re in good health.
  • A major change has occurred. Avoid initiating weaning during a time of major change. If your family has recently moved or your child care situation has changed, for example, postpone weaning until a less stressful time. If your baby is struggling with the weaning process, consider trying again in a month or two.

How Do I Begin Weaning?

Consider weaning the right way

Slowly tapering off how long and how often you breast-feed each day — over the course of weeks or months — will cause your milk supply to gradually diminish and prevent engorgement. It might be easiest to drop a midday breast-feeding session first. After a lunch of solid food, your child might become interested in an activity and naturally give up this session. Once you’ve dropped one feeding, you can work on dropping another.(Paid link here).

Should I refuse feedings during the weaning process?

Refusing to breast-feed when your child wants to nurse can increase your child’s focus on the activity. If your child wants to nurse, go ahead. Then, continue working to distract him or her with new foods, activities and sources of reassurance — such as a favorite stuffed animal — around the times of your typical breast-feeding sessions.

https://amzn.to/2WFjuO7

What about nutrition after weaning?

If you wean your child from breastfeeding before age 1, use expressed breast milk or iron-fortified formula. Don’t give your child cow’s milk until after his or her first birthday.

You can wean your child to a bottle and then a cup or directly to a cup. When introducing your child to a bottle, choose a time when he or she isn’t extremely hungry and might have more patience. Use a bottle nipple with a slow flow at first. If you use a bottle nipple with a fast flow, your child might become accustomed to that and get frustrated with the pacing and different flow rate of milk during breast-feeding.

How long does weaning take? Really!

Weaning could take days, weeks or months. Even after you successfully wean your child from day feedings, you might continue to breast-feed in the morning and before your child’s bedtime to keep up that feeling of closeness.

Breast-feeding is an intimate experience. You might have mixed emotions about letting go. But by taking a gradual approach to weaning — and offering lots of affection — you can help your child make a smooth transition to a bottle or cup. This worked well for me. It was pretty easy for my kids to wean from the breast. When I showed disinterest, they also became disinterested. (Paid link here).

Bottom Line

So we know that weaning is the process of exchanging breast for bottle, cup use, or solid foods. Additionally, there are different types of weaning. Knowing the best time to do it and begin is very important. There are certain circumstances when weaning should be delayed. Mamas it is Ok to slip some breastfeeding in once in a while if baby wants to. Remember patience is the key.

Thank you for stopping by today . I have some affiliate links in the post to help give you some convivence in your shopping needs. I will receive a small commission at no extra cost to you. Remember to ask God to help you as you go through every process in your life. He told us that “In all your ways acknowledge Him, and He shall direct your path”. I ask Him and get good results. I hope your breastfeeding weaning experience be a really great one. I wish you every success. Do visit again. I would love to hear from you in the comments below.

HERE IS YOUR FREE PROMOCODE –551C29 TO GET YOUR GIFT OF 10 PAIRS OF BREAST PADSMother’s Lounge – For all of your Baby Needs CONGRATULATIONS!!! & Enjoy

Get your taxes done right with TurboTax

Breastfeeding And Relactation: Tips To Making It Possible Again


Relactation is possible

This website contains affiliate links, which means I earn small commission from products and services you purchase through my links at no extra cause to you

Hello Mamas! I have got a very interesting topic for you today. Our topic today is breastfeeding and relactation. There are many reasons why relaxation may be necessary. Maybe you and your baby were separated due to medical issues and you weren’t able to keep up with breastfeeding, and you want to try again.

It could be that your baby weaned months ago, but now seems interested again, and you want to know if it’s worth a shot. Or you want to start to breastfeeding (so many of us do!) and decided to wean. Now you’re having second thoughts, and want to know how to bring your supply back and start breastfeeding again.

Ready for some good news? It is possible to do this!

Relactation, which simply means starting up breastfeeding again after a period of not breastfeeding, takes diligence, work, and determination, and many Mamas have successfully done it.

The key is having realistic expectations, learning a few tricks to increase your chances of success, having a strong support system — and maybe most of all, being gentle with yourself along the way.

What Factors Increase Relactation Success?

There are some things you must consider when you begin your journey. Keep in mind that all people are different and respond to the efforts of relactation with different degrees of success. So Mama do not compare yourself with anyone. Your journey is personal.

Some women will be able to bring in a full supply within weeks. Some will take a bit longer, and some will never quite be able to bring back a full milk supply. Every ounce of breast milk counts, though, and making peace with what you have is vital when you’re working on relactating.

That said, here are some factors that will determine how successful you will be at relactation:

  • The younger your baby is, the easier it will be to relactate. Moms with babies in the 3 to 4 month range usually have the highest success rates.
  • The more well established your milk supply was before weaning, the easier it will be to re-establish it.
  • The more time you have to attempt breastfeeding and pumping, the better, as frequent and effective breastfeeding and pumping is the most important physiological factor for relactation.
  • The more interested in breastfeeding your baby is, the easier this process will be. Keep your baby interested by continuing with skin to skin practices as often as possible.
  • The more educated you are about how relactation works, the more success you’ll have.
  • The more support you have from family, friends, and healthcare providers, the more likely you’ll be to persevere and not give up.

How long does relactation take?

Again, each body reacts differently to attempts at relactation. However, you can expect to see some initial results within about 2 weeks of trying. Some experts believe that the amount of time it takes to relactate is about equal to how long it’s been since you weaned from breastfeeding.

In her book, Breastfeeding Answers Made Simple, Nancy Mohrbacher, IBCLC, concludes that based on available research, full relactation takes an average of about 1 month for most people.

Ask God For His Help: Keep the Faith As You Try!

Breast milk supply waxes and wanes during the time that you’re breastfeeding, and you may have noticed that it took a while for the entire “milk making factory” to go out of business, even after you weaned. You may still be able to express a little milk, even though it’s been weeks or months since you last nursed or pumped.

Have faith and know that breastfeeding is a hearty, flexible, fluid process, and if you previously breastfed, it may be easier than you think to get things rolling again. Mama have some faith and ask God to go with you on this journey. He wants us to cast every care on Him, because He cares for us.

How Does Milk Production Work?

The more you breastfeed or pump, the more milk you will make

Milk production works like this: The more you take, the more you make. And the single most effective thing for you to do if you want to relactate is to breastfeed or pump as frequently as possible.

Any stimulation of the breast — whether milk is coming out at first or not — will tell your body to produce more milk. To induce a full milk supply, you’ll want to aim to nurse or pump 8 to 12 times a day, or every 2 to 3 hours, including at least once a night.

Again, at first, you’ll only see drops or not much milk at all. If you keep nursing or pumping, you should start to see increases within a week or so. A little patience goes a long way here.

Not all babies will breastfeed weeks or months after weaning, but you’ll be surprised how many babies will happily try, especially if you offer the breast before bed, after a nap, after a bath, or during skin-to-skin time.

Best Tips For Relactation

Making bottle more like breastfeeds: If you do use bottles, try to make bottle feeding more like breastfeeding by using a slow flow teat, keeping baby upright, taking pauses in the feed, holding baby skin-to-skin and more. See How to Bottle Feed a Breastfed Baby and Best Bottle for a Breastfed Baby for more tips.

  •  Make breastfeeding more like bottle feeding: Nipple shields can be helpful if baby won’t latch to a naked breast as the silicone shield will feel more like a familiar bottle teat.
  • Keep baby well fed: Not Losing weight: Make sure your baby is not desperately hungry while he practices so that he does not associate the breast with frustration and hunger.
  • Be patient While Breastfeeding :Let Baby Lick, lick, lick!
  • Never force your baby to the breast. Babies may touch, lick or nuzzle the nipple before they latch. Be patient. Dropping breast milk or formula on the areola towards the nipple can encourage a baby to lick the breast and latch (drop and drip).
  • Night Feeds Are Important for a milk supply as that is when prolactin levels are higher5
  • Offering Both Breasts Per Feed :This helps build supply and sustains breastfeeding.
  • Use breast compressions : To increase the flow of milk and keep baby sucking as long as possible (being careful not to disturb your baby’s latch).
  • Spend lots of time skin-to-skin with your baby; this increases prolactin levels, which can also increase your milk supply.Let your baby come to the breast as often as they wish. Practice it as often as possible. Lying down and standing. A sling to carry baby is good to.(Paid link here)
  • Make sure your baby is well latched, taking in a good portion of your nipple and areola and sucking effectively.
  • Continue to offer supplementary milk so that your baby will continue to grow and thrive as you rebuild your milk supply. It’s important not to stop supplementing until your supply has increased.
  • Allow comfort nursing as much as your baby likes — at first, you can think of nursing as “snacks” and build up to actual meals as your supply increases.
  • Consider using an atbreast nursing supplementary, which is a flexible tube attached to your breast that delivers milk while your baby nurses and stimulates your supply.
  • If your baby will not breastfeed, or won’t breastfeed often:
  • Pump your milk frequently to ensure that you reach your goal of stimulating and emptying the breasts every 2 to 3 hours or so.
  • Make sure your pump is in good working order. Consider renting a hospital-grade pump for maximum effectiveness.
  • Consider adding massage and hand expression to your pumping routine. (Paid link here)
  • Considerpower pumping,” where you pump several times an hour for an hour or two to simulate cluster feeding, which naturally increases supply.

In addition to nursing or pumping, you may want to consider adding a galactagogue to the mix. A galactagogue is any food, herb, or prescription medication that is thought to help boost your milk supply.

Popular choices include oatmeal and lactation cookies, and herbs like fenugreekblessed thistle, and goat’s rue. You might consider drinking teas made with some of these herbs.

Speak with your healthcare provider about what herbs are safe for you to try, and about the potential risks of any supplements you are considering. Your doctor may also be open to prescribing medication that increases milk supply.

Shop for lactation cookiesfenugreek, blessed thistle, and goat’s rue online.

What About Lactation And Not Pregnant: Is This Possible?

Yes ! lactation is possible if you are not pregnant

Absolutely yes! it is possible to lactate and not be pregnant. Many women resort to adop and want to experience bonding with their baby. This is where relactation comes into play.

Are you considering relactation? Relactation or induced lactation (for those who did not give birth to their baby) is essentially a two-fold process:

  1. Firstly, you will be teaching (or re-teaching) baby to nurse at the breast, and to equate nursing with comfort. If you’re having problems getting baby to nurse, see Help — My Baby Won’t Nurse!
  2. At the same time you will be developing (or re-developing) a milk supply. Developing a milk supply requires nipple stimulation (via baby nursing, hand expression, pumping or a combination) and milk removal (once there is milk to remove). If your baby will nurse, regular and frequent nursing sessions (even if baby is just learning in the beginning) will be very helpful.

If your baby is 4 months old or younger it will generally be easier to relactate. It will also be easier if your milk supply was well established (frequent and effective nursing and/or pumping) during the first 4-6 weeks postpartum. However, moms with older babies, moms who did not establish a good milk supply in the beginning, and adoptive moms who have never breastfed can also get good results. The benefits of breastfeeding is what makes it so worthwhile.  even if you do not have a full milk supply.

Finding A Breastfeeding Specialist

A specialist can make the world of a difference in your results

breastfeeding specialist can be invaluable to identify the reasons why breastfeeding didn’t get off to a good start the first time round or to find the reasons why you had a low milk supply so that you can avoid running into the same problems again. With specialist breastfeeding help most difficulties can be overcome and you can be fully prepared for a successful breastfeeding journey.

Consider Using Galactagogues

There are many galactagogues available for breastfeeding moms today

Galactagogues are specific foods, herbs or prescription medicines that are thought to help a milk supply when coupled with efficient breast drainage. Galactagogues are not always needed for relactation—many mothers have brought back a milk supply by expressing or breastfeeding alone, particularly in places with a strong breastfeeding culture 2 3. Some mothers use herbal supplements, such as fenugreek or blessed thistle, to stimulate milk production. You can usually buy these at health food stores or herb shops and occasionally at some large supermarkets or pharmacies. For more information see There are also several prescription medications that increase milk supply. These herbal and pharmaceutical methods for stimulating milk supply will not be particularly effective unless combined with frequent nursing and/or pumping.See   What is a galactagogue? Do I need one? …Herbal remedies for increasing milk supply.

What is a Galactagogue? for further reading.

What If Baby Is Not Nursing Well?

Pumping can make a difference in increasing your milk supply

If baby is not nursing well (or not yet latching at all), pumping will make a big difference in increasing your milk supply. Even if baby appears to be nursing well, additional pumping will speed up the relactation process. See Establishing and maintaining milk supply when baby is not nursing for more information. You will also want to take a look at some of the reasons why you are not having a rich milk supply. Keep working at it – some babies have gone back to the breast after many months of bottle feeding. Even if you are not able to persuade baby to latch, you have the option of re-establishing your milk supply via pumping and giving baby your milk via bottle or cup (this is called exclusive pumping).

Nursing Supplementary Feedings

Supplementary feeds will stimulate your breasts to make more milk

Consider giving your baby his feedings via an alternative feeding method (rather than a bottle), such as a nursing supplementer, feeding syringe, finger feeding setup, flexible cup, spoon, medicine/eye dropper, etc. If your baby is latching well, a nursing supplementer can be a big help: it will encourage your baby to nurse at your breast by giving him a constant flow of milk (expressed milk and/or formula) while he stimulates your breasts to produce more milk.

Bottom Line

Isn’t it great that you can still breastfeed if you have stopped, never started or have not even been pregnant. This is amazing! It is important that if you are going to succeed in this, you must follow the guidelines as much as possible. Remember that the more you breastfeed or pump, the more milk you will make , so do them both as often as possible. And not forgetting the skin to skin. You must do all you can with it to keep baby interested. Get hooked up with a lactation specialist to help you through. Ask God to help you, trust, talk to Him about every situation that concerns you. Thank you for stopping by today and do visit again I would love to have your email address. You are bless today.

HERE IS YOUR FREE PROMOCODE M294429 @ Mother’s Lounge – For all of your Baby Needs GET YOUR GIFT OF 10 PAIRS OF BREAST PADS– CONGRATULATIONS!!! & Enjoy

FOR MORE READING SEE:

Never run out of your favorite laundry products

Breastfeeding And Sexual Intercourse: All You Need To Know


Breastfeeding and intimacy does not have to be overwhelming. Lets learn the facts!

This website contains affiliate links, which means I earn money from products and services you purchase through my links at no extra cause to you.

Breastfeeding is a wonderful event in a woman’s life. It is a time of genuine love flowing from mother to chil. I had the priviledge of breastfeeding all of my babies. There was so much satisfaction and peace when I breastfeed them. The situations was not always the best but I was able to overcome them with persistence and patience.

After having my babies, I really did not wish to even hear the word SEX before the six week mark and even after I was still sorta -like not ready. I know everyone is different and we all have different experiences right? Today we are going to discuss another hot topic: breast feeding and sexual intercourse. What are the effects of breastfeeding on a woman’s sexuality? Grab your favorite treats and lets talk about this not so popular topic that we hardly talk about but I know every postpartum woman thinks about. (Paid link).

When Is It The Safest Time To Have Sex After Having A Baby?

Oftentimes, after having a baby sex is the last thing on a woman’s mind

There’s no required waiting period for intercourse after delivery, though most health care experts recommend you wait four to six weeksTrusted Source to have sex again. This gives you time to heal following delivery or surgery.

Between the late-night feedings and early-morning dirty diapers, however, sex may be the last thing on your mind. Your body is undergoing a lot of change during this time. This includes changes brought on by breastfeeding.

Some women find that the extra attention to their breasts, as well as the engorged shape, make them feel less attractive. Others feel more attractive.

All of these things are normal. Keep these factors in mind when you feel ready to be intimate with your partner again after the arrival of your baby.

Does breastfeeding affect sex drive?

After birth, prolactin & oxytocin rise while estrogen levels fall affecting your sex drive

Absolutely yes, breastfeeding can affect your sex drive. Results from a 2005 studyTrusted Source found that women who were breastfeeding were more likely to delay resuming intercourse following the birth of their child than women who didn’t breastfeed.

After delivery, your estrogen level will fall, and the levels of two hormones, prolactin and oxytocin, will rise. These two hormones have very different impacts on your body, and each can interfere with your sex drive.

The combination of increased prolactin and oxytocin may make you feel great pleasure from breastfeeding. Your emotional and physical intimacy needs may be met by breastfeeding your little one, so your sex drive may decrease. You may not feel the need or desire to seek affection from your partner. This is exactly how I felt. Many women become aroused sexually and even can get orgasms while breastfeeding. I focused on loving my new baby . Sex was so far from my mind. After having a baby , you go through so much as a woman. After waiting nine months for this joy before me, and the business of postpartum, trying to get a good sleep and do the regular chores, I really had no time to think about sex. Some women even ignore their partners during this stage. (Paid link).

The opposite can happen too. The increased hormones and sensual touching can increase your sexual desire. The breasts are an erogenous zone. You may find that you’re more easily aroused thanks to the surging hormones and sensations in your body.

Often, we have to spend almost every waking minute of the day (and night) caring for our little ones. This doesn’t allow for much time, or desire, to be intimate with our partners.

It’s true that we can extrapolate many of the above changes to women who choose to bottle feed. However, the scores on the indices of female sexual function that assess desire are generally lower in women who breastfeed.

If you think breastfeeding is affecting your sex drive, it’s important to know this is normal. Between hormonal changes and lifestyle interruptions after a baby’s arrival, your libido may peak and fall for a period. In time, your sex drive should return to what it was before the arrival of your baby.

Breastfeeding Can Affect A Woman’s Self Image

Think positively about your self image. You are what you think!

Women who breastfeed may suffer alterations in their self-image. For example, breasts and areolas may also be larger, with continuous milk secretion or greater pigmentation. Breasts go from being an erotic object to the source of food for our little one.

Also, for many women, they’re very sensitive, making touch uncomfortable.

When breastfeeding, many women gain weight. What’s more, body fat is distributed in a very peculiar way, predominantly on the hips. Therefore, women may not recognize themselves in the mirror. These changes, which continue during breastfeeding, can make women feel unsexy, and this affects their sexuality.

Insomnia Affects A Woman’s Sexuality

Due to the multiple times that woman have to wake up to meet their baby’s feeding demands, mothers who breastfeed are more at risk of sleep deprivation than mothers who don’t breastfeed.

This, according to studies, could directly affect sexual relations. Many women need rest rather than intimate encounters with their partners. Clearly, a lack of sleep influences sexual relations. This was a real factor for me.

Leaking Breasts And Sex

Be prepared to experience leaking if you’re breastfeeding and having sex.

Within days of giving birth, your breasts will fill with milk. Touching, rubbing, or sucking on the nipples during intercourse may release breast milk. You may even leak or spray breast milk during orgasm.

These three techniques can help you manage this:

  1. Nurse or pump ahead of time. If you have the time, try to reduce the amount of milk in your breasts before having sex. This will reduce the risk of a leak.
  2. Wear a bra with nursing pads. If you and your partner are fine with keeping your breasts covered during intercourse, nursing pads tucked inside a bra can absorb any leaks.
  3. Talk about it beforehand. Talk with your partner about the chances of this happening during intercourse. If it doesn’t bother you, don’t worry about it. It’s natural.

Painful sex and breastfeeding

Take one day at a time!

While you’re breastfeeding, your body produces less estrogen. Estrogen is a key hormone for arousal and natural vaginal lubrication.

With the low levels of the hormone, you may find that getting turned on takes longer and your vagina is too dry for comfortable penetration during intercourse.

Take your time with foreplay, and keep a bottle of a water-based lubricant handy to make things easier when between the sheets.

Likewise, you may experience nipple pain because of breastfeeding. The feeding and sucking from your little one may make your flesh sensitive. If you’re uncomfortable having your partner touch your breasts during intercourse, make sure to talk about this ahead of time. Let them know you’d prefer to have a “look but don’t touch” rule. This way, your partner can get arousal from the visual while you feel more comfortable and relaxed.

How to talk to your partner about sex

Talking about sex with your partner can help you both to understand and determine if you are ready for sex

During this new and exciting time in your lives, it’s important that you be open and honest with your partner. Sex postpartum can be fun and pleasurable. However, as with everything else that’s new in your life right now — like 3 a.m. feedings, runny diapers, and tiny socks — you need to work through it with your partner.

Have a conversation about sex and how you feel about it. This can be tricky or uncomfortable, but it doesn’t have to be. Use these talking points to guide you:

  • Be honest. Reveal your insecurities and concerns. You will be a better partner and allow your partner to better serve you if you’re honest about how you feel — the good and the bad.
  • Consider what you want. Ask yourself what you really seek in pleasure and intimacy right now. If it’s not penetrative sex, say so. If something doesn’t feel comfortable, speak up. Likewise, listen when your partner expresses their concerns and desires.
  • Respect your body. You’ll know when you’re ready for sex again. If it’s not as soon as you want, that’s fine. You and your partner can explore other ways to be intimate. If you’re worried about pain or discomfort during intercourse, talk with your doctor. You might consider bringing your partner with you to the appointment too. This way you can both ask questions and feel more secure in your choices.
  • Don’t avoid awkward conversations. Your body undergoes a lot of changes during pregnancy and in the months after your baby is delivered. If sex doesn’t feel as pleasurable anymore (delivery can stretch muscles), talk with your partner about trying a new position. Don’t assume it’s better to stay silent. Pleasure and intimacy are a two-way street.

Other ideas for intimacy

Staying close and happy can do wonders for your sexual relationship

Intimacy is more than sex. Sex is more than penetrative intercourse. If you and your partner are looking for ways to reconnect and engage one another in intimate ways, consider these techniques:

  • Spend time together. You may feel like you don’t have a minute to spare when there are dishes to be washed and bottles to be filled, but make spending time with your partner a priority. This way, you both know how important you are to one another, and your sexual passion can naturally reignite.
  • Kiss and make out. And keep your clothing on. This allows you to feel aroused again and may encourage sexual activities in the future that both of you can look forward to.
  • Try new techniques. Mutual masturbation, oral sex, and sex toys may also be a good idea in this postdelivery period. These techniques allow you both to get the level and type of intimacy you need while feeling connected with one another.
  • Care for one another. When you’ve had only a handful of hours of sleep and you’re covered in spit-up, the last thing you may feel is sexy or desirable. Be honest with your partner about your needs so they can help you. You may just need them to hold the baby while you shower. These small acts of care and love can go a long way to increasing sensuality and feeling loved.
  • Take care of yourself. You may feel like the walk from the couch to the bathroom is far enough, but you may also find that some forms of moderate exercise go a great way toward helping you feel better. Caring for yourself can go a long way toward helping you feel better, more desirable, and more passionate too. Exercise for your mental health — and your sexual health.
  • Go outside and enjoy nature together. It can do wonders for your mental health.

Is breastfeeding a natural form of birth control?

Lactational amenorrhea is possible for 6 months

Breastfeeding can be a natural form of birth control. This is known as the lactational amenorrhea method (LAM). If used properly, breastfeeding can be 98 percentTrusted Source effective at preventing pregnancy within the first six months after the baby’s delivery.

However, it’s not as simple as it sounds. LAM requires a very precise method. First, you must have a baby who is less than 6 months old. Second, you must exclusively breastfeed your infant, with feedings at least every four to six hours apart. If you use formula or solid foods in addition to breastfeeding, this method won’t work. Lastly, if you’ve had a period since childbirth, this method is no longer effective.

Research shows that only 26 percentTrusted Source of women practicing LAM actually met the criteria for it. If you’re using breastfeeding as a form of birth control, talk with your doctor about a backup method if you’re trying to avoid pregnancy. Learn more about birth control that’s safe to use while breastfeeding.

Bottom Line

Female sexuality is cyclical and very complex, being affected by multiple factors. Being aware of them and how they can affect us can help us anticipate and respect the changes that can modify the female sexual response in different stages of life, including the breastfeeding period. So I encourage you to do the best you can to make your sexuality while breastfeeding as pleasant as possible. I would love to have your email address to keep you informed. Remember to keep God first in your life and ask Him to help you in any difficult event of your life. If you are a male reading this I hope you understand how breastfeeding and sexuality work after a woman has a baby. Yes I know its a lot.

HERE IS YOUR FREE PROMOCODE- M294429 @ Mother’s Lounge – For all of your Baby Needs

TO GET YOUR FREE GIFT OF 10 PAIRS OF BREAST PADS– CONGRATULATIONS!!! & Enjoy

Alexa, play holiday music.

Breastfeeding And Sexual Arousal: Removing The Stigma


Many women experience sexual arousal while breastfeeding which is normal

This website contains affiliate links, which means I earn money from products and services you purchase through my links at no extra cause to you. Thank you for your consideration.

Hello Mamas! Boy we have an exciting topic today. Breastfeeding and sexual arousal! You know I had a client come into my office the other day and she told me that she was five months pregnant and wanted to know if I delivered babies at my clinic. She had decided that she preferred to have an out of hospital experience . This was her second baby. No, I do not deliver babies I told her but I can surely mentor you during your pregnancy. (Promotional link).

She then proceeded to ask me what I did at the clinic. I told her our services . She commented on breastfeeding, that she was not able to breastfeed her first baby because it actually aroused her sexually while her baby breastfed. and she did not like getting aroused so early after having a baby. She asked me if there was something she could do to prevent it because she really wanted to try breastfeeding this one. I shared with her that my experience was one where I felt the excitement but not to that extreme. I just felt loving by mother oxytocin. I focused all that energy into my newborn baby. We are not all the same. There are different strokes for different folks.

Did you know that while firm numbers are hard to find, research suggests that between 33 and 50% of women have experienced arousal while breastfeeding? It seems to be a taboo topic because hardly anyone talks about it.

This Is Normal But We Hardly Talk About It

It’s real, 59 studies found that at least a quarter of women experience sexual arousal while breastfeeding

“It’s common, but women don’t talk about it,” according to Viola Polomeno, an associate professor in the University of Ottawa’s School of Nursing and a sexuality researcher. Arousal during breastfeeding is completely normal, according to nurses and lactation consultants, and it shouldn’t be a source of shame or anxiety. It’s not a woman’s choice, it’s how we are wired; but if a woman knows in advance how this works, she’ll be a little more comfortable with it. (Paid link here)

Mamas and dads do you know that there are 59 studies regarding breast feeding found that at least a quarter of women who report arousal while nursing feel a sense of guilt over it. Many are too scared to discuss it even with their partners. “The breast is an erogenous zone,” explained Mary Jo Podgurski, a nurse and childbirth educator in Pennsylvania. “But if a woman feels anything sexual while performing a motherly duty,” she may wonder, “What’s wrong with me?”Mamas absolutely nothing is wrong with you; nothing at all!

Here’s the Biological Theory To Breastfeeding And Being Sexually Aroused

There’s a biological theory, too, which boils down to the fact that many of the ingredients present during sexual experiences are also present during the act. When a woman breastfeeds, her body releases two very important hormones: prolactin and oxytocin. Prolactin stimulates milk production and helps with bonding. It also makes women feel relaxed and sleepy. Meanwhile, oxytocin, famously known as the “feel good” bonding hormone, creates feelings of pleasure for the mother—and causes the uterus to contract. The other instance in which oxytocin is released and the uterus contracts? (Promotional link).

Some women become aroused enough to orgasm while breastfeeding. A Dutch study of 153 nursing moms, published in 2006, found that 8% reported orgasming while breastfeeding. Several experts mentioned this phenomenon to me as well. “We know that in a certain situation, if the mother is sitting with her legs crossed, that puts pressure on the clitoris and it can get stimulated,” said Polomeno.

Notably, some nursing mothers will shoot milk from their nipples while orgasming during sex—thanks, once again, to hormones. “When oxytocin is released into the bloodstream it can cause milk ejection,” says Diana West, a lactation consultant for La Leche League and author of several breastfeeding books. Another illustration of the way breasts, nursing, milk production, and sexual experiences are all, biologically speaking, connected.(Paid link here).

While the combination of nipple stimulation, hormones, and uterine contractions can all lead to feelings of arousal, these feelings in no way signal that a mother is turned on by her baby, or has sexual feelings toward her child. “You’re just pushing certain buttons,” said Podgurski. Yet education and communication about the topic is key to helping mothers—and the public—understand what’s really going on.

Years Ago Mothers Were Visited By the Child Protection Services

Years ago mothers baby was taken from her because of fear of sexual arousal influence on baby

While discussing arousal during breastfeeding today may raise eyebrows, a few decades ago—before the academics and researchers started speaking out—it might have sparked more serious consequences. Confessing such feelings may have even called into question whether a woman was fit to be a mother, said Polomeno. “I would say, 15 years ago, here in Canada, when women said they were aroused during breastfeeding, Child Protection Services would come in and remove the child.”

Society Makes This All Taboo: Women Need To Be Free To Speak About Their Feelings

The 2006 study on breastfeeding and sexuality describes a specific—and extremely disturbing—case of a mother losing her child here in the United States. The author, Roy Levin, a British behavioral scientist, wrote, “Ignorance about such normal physiological occurrences can sometimes create gross miscarriages of the law.” For example, he said, “a mother in Syracuse, New York in 1992 had her two-year-old child taken away from her after admitting that she became aroused on nursing, the authorities claiming that she sexually abused the child.“( Promotional link).

According to newspaper articles at the time, the mother had simply called a hotline with a question: Is it normal to be aroused while breastfeeding? The volunteer who answered the phone equated her question with sexual abuse and contacted authorities. The mother spent the night in jail was separated from her daughter. While criminal charges were dismissed, sexual abuse and neglect charges were filed in family court. (Government officials were also ignorant to the fact that it is completely normal and healthy for two-year-old children to nurse.)

Anthropology and biology aside—psychology may play a role in women’s experiences while nursing as well. Women’s breasts are sexualized nearly their entire lives, and research shows that more than 80% of women experience sexual arousal from nipple stimulation. There’s no reason to think that just because a child is born the sexual component of breasts disappears.

“Human emotional psychology is tied to hormonal experiences,” explained La Leche’s West. “Breastfeeding really is such a primal experience, and the hormones accentuate the situation.” Which means, for some women, the feelings of sexuality and eroticism typically associated with breasts can carry over into breastfeeding.

On the flip side, she said, some women focus less on their breasts during sex while lactating, to avoid blurring any lines. Every woman’s experience is different and deeply personal. “I would say almost every woman, even in her 90s, can tell you about her breastfeeding experience,” she told me, “because it’s so meaningful.”

While increased understanding has limited dramatic reactions to arousal, breastfeeding experts argue that we, as a society, should do more to fight stigma. “I’ve been talking about sexuality and breastfeeding during my Lamaze class since the mid-80s, because we need to talk about the stuff that our culture doesn’t talk about,” Podgurski said. Interestingly, she told me, it’s younger moms—particularly the ones in her teen support groups—who are more comfortable bringing up the arousal questions.(Promotional link).

“Teens will bring up the erotic feeling more so than other generations,” she said. “Someone will say it’s arousing, someone will giggle and say they’re happy their partner is there that night, and someone might say that it’s never happened to them.” The whole point, she said, is to communicate to women that they’ll experience a range of sensations after giving birth.

For her part, Polomeno stresses the need for communication on a larger scale and a more concerted effort between the media, public health departments, and healthcare professionals to normalize these feelings and increase awareness.

“So many prenatal healthcare professionals are not comfortable talking about it because they haven’t been trained,” she said. “We need to arm them with the knowledge.”

Bottom Line

While nothing is being done to help women with this issue, I would like to encourage you to not let that stop you from breastfeeding your baby. Set your mind to the fact that you are nurturing your baby. Focus your mind, like I did solely on loving your baby as you feed him. Remember you are what you think. Society has to change the stigma that becoming aroused while breastfeeding is dirty, because it is not and allow women to be free in expressing how they feel. I hope you learned something. Thank you for stopping by and do visit again. I would be happy to have your email list.

Here is your PROMOTIONAL CODE M294429 FOR YOUR FREE BREAST PADS!! Congratulations! Redeem at checkout

How To Keep Your Breast Pump Squeaky Clean: Best Tips To Keep Baby Safe


Be prepared for cleaning your pump regularly

This website contains affiliate links, which means I earn money from products and services you purchase through my links at no extra cost to you

Everyone knows that providing breast milk is one of the best things you can do for your baby’s health and development. Pumping your milk is one way to provide breast milk to your baby. With breast milk being a good medium for bacterial growth, germs can grow quickly in breast milk or breast milk residue that remains on pump parts. Following these steps can keep your breast pump clean and help protect your baby from these germs. If your baby was born prematurely or has other health concerns, your baby’s health care providers may have more recommendations for pumping breast milk safely.(Paid link here)

Today we are going to learn some really cool ways to keep your breast pump squeaky clean for the safety of your baby. Are you ready? Here we go:

Before Cleaning

Handwashing is your first defense in cleaning your pump
  1. Wash hands. Wash your hands well with soap and water for 20 seconds.
  2. Assemble. Assemble clean pump kit. Inspect whether the pump kit or tubing has become moldy or soiled during storage. If your tubing is moldy, discard and replace immediately.
  3. Clean if using a shared pump. Clean pump dials, power switch, and countertop with disinfectant wipe. Avoid using personal pumps.

After Cleaning

Always store milk properly after pumping
  1. Store milk safely. Cap milk collection bottle or seal milk collection bag, label with date and time, and immediately place in a refrigerator, freezer, or cooler bag with ice packs. If milk collection container will be stored at a hospital or childcare facility, add name to the label
  2. Clean pumping area. Especially if using a shared pump, clean the dials, power switch, and countertop with disinfectant wipes.
  3. Take apart and inspect pump kit. Take apart breast pump tubing and separate all parts that come in contact with breast/breast milk (for example, flanges, valves, membranes, connectors, and milk collection bottles).
  4. Rinse pump kit. Rinse breast pump parts that come into contact with breast/breast milk under running water to remove remaining milk
  5. Clean pump kit. As soon as possible after pumping, clean pump parts that come into contact with breast/breast milk in one of the following ways.
    • Clean by hand.

Cleaning By Hand

  1. Use a wash basin. Place pump parts in a clean wash basin used only for washing infant feeding equipment. Do not place pump parts directly in the sink, because germs in sinks or drains could contaminate the pump.
      1. Add soap and water. Fill wash basin with hot water and add soap.
      2. Scrub. Scrub items according to pump kit manufacturer’s guidance. If using a brush, use a clean one that is used only to clean infant feeding items.
      3. Rinse. Rinse by holding items under running water, or by submerging in fresh water in a separate basin that is used only for cleaning infant feeding items.
      4. Dry. Allow to air-dry thoroughly. Place pump parts, wash basin, and bottle brush on a clean, unused dish towel or paper towel in an area protected from dirt and dust. Do not use a dish towel to rub or pat items dry because doing so may transfer germs to the items.

Clean in a Dishwasher (if recommended by pump kit manufacturer).

  1. Wash. Place disassembled pump parts in dishwasher. Be sure to place small items into a closed-top basket or mesh laundry bag so they don’t end up in the dishwasher filter. If possible, run the dishwasher using hot water and a heated drying cycle (or sanitizing setting); this can help kill more germs.
  2. Remove from dishwasher. Wash your hands with soap and water before removing and storing cleaned items. If items are not completely dry, place items on a clean, unused dish towel or paper towel to air-dry thoroughly before storing. Do not use a dish towel to rub or pat items dry because doing so may transfer germs to the items.
  3. Clean wash basin and bottle brush. If you use a wash basin or bottle brush when cleaning your pump parts, rinse them well and allow them to air-dry after each use. Consider washing them every few days, either in a dishwasher with hot water and a heated drying cycle, if they are dishwasher-safe, or by hand with soap and warm water.

Sanitize For Added Protection

Keeping germs at bay is one of the best things you can do to keeping baby safe. Practice sanitizing pump parts at least once daily. Sanitizing is especially important if your baby is less than 3 months old, was born prematurely, or has a weakened immune system due to illness or medical treatment (such as chemotherapy for cancer). Daily sanitizing of pump parts may not be necessary for older, healthy babies, if the parts are cleaned carefully after each use. Sanitize all items (even the bottle brush and wash basin!) by using one of the following options.

Note: If you use a dishwasher with hot water and a heating drying cycle (or sanitizing setting) to clean infant feeding items, a separate sanitizing step is not necessary.

  1. Clean first. Pump parts, bottle brushes, and wash basins should be sanitized only after they have been cleaned.
  2. Sanitize. Sanitize the pump kit, bottle brushes, and wash basins using one of the following options. Check manufacturer’s instructions about whether items may be steamed or boiled.
    1. Steam:
      • Use a microwave or plug-in steam system according to the manufacturer’s directions.

b)Boil

  1. Place disassembled items that are safe to boil into a pot and cover with water.
    • Put the pot over heat and bring to a boil.
    • Boil for 5 minutes.
    • Remove items with clean tongs.
  2. Allow to air-dry thoroughly. Place sanitized pump parts, wash basin, and bottle brush on a clean, unused dish towel or paper towel in an area protected from dirt and dust. Do not use a dish towel to rub or pat items dry because doing so may transfer germs to the items

Cleaning the Electrical Unit for a Powered Breast Pump

Electrical units, which hold the motor and batteries, should be wiped down with a clean paper towel or soft cloth after each use.

The electrical unit should never be put into water or other liquids for cleaning. It should also never be cleaned using a microwave sterilizer.

Some breast pump manufacturers make wipes just for cleaning breast pumps, which can make cleaning more convenient when you are away from home. Even if these wipes are used, breast pump parts that come into contact with breast milk should still be cleaned using liquid dishwashing soap and warm water before pumping.( Paid link here).

Store Safely Until Needed

Allow pump parts to air dry after cleaning

Allow the clean pump parts, bottle brushes, and wash basins to air-dry thoroughly before storing to help prevent germs and mold from growing. Once completely dry, the items should be stored in a clean, protected area to prevent contamination during storage.

  • Wash hands. Wash hands well with soap and water.
  • Reassemble. Put together the clean, dry pump parts.
  • Store safely. Place reassembled pump kit in a clean, protected area such as inside an unused, sealable food storage bag. Store wash basins and bottle brushes in a clean area.

Here Are More Essential Tips

  • When used correctly, breast pump tubing does not touch the pumped milk and does not need to be cleaned routinely.
  • Keep a spare set of tubing on hand in case the set you are using gets soiled or damaged.
  • If your tubing has water droplets in it at the end of a pumping session, disconnect the tubing from the flange/pump kit, but leave it attached to the pump. Run the pump for a few more minutes until the tubing is dry.
  • If your tubing has milk or mold in it, throw it away immediately because it is difficult to clean properly. Replace it with a new set of tubing, and check to see if the problem happened because
    • The valves or membranes need to be replaced.
    • The tubing was attached to the pump incorrectly.
  • If the outside of your tubing is soiled, wipe it with a damp cloth or disinfectant wipe.
  • Never borrow a breast pump from someone who was using one personally. There is always the chance that breast milk residue is in the pump. A hospital used pump would be better because we know that hospitals sterilize there products before use using lots of heat to destroy bacteria. (Paid link here).

Bottom Line

Ensuring that your breast pump is always kept clean is a wonderful move in securing the health of your baby. Practice the steps before, and after cleaning as much as possible. Remember sanitizing, and storage is also important. (Paid link). I hope you learned and enjoyed this post. I would love to have you on my mailing list. If you have anything you would like for me to share let me know in the comment below.

HERE IS YOUR FREE PROMOCODE – M294429 TO GET YOUR GIFT OF 10 PAIRS OF BREAST PADS–

@ Mother’s Lounge – For all of your Baby Needs CONGRATULATIONS!!! & Enjoy

Breastfeeding With Large Boobs: 17 Tips How To Breastfeed With Ease


Breastfeeding with large breasts is possible

Breastfeeding can as we know can come with many challenges. So imagine trying to breastfeed with large breasts and a small baby? Or large breasts with large breasts. Either one can b very difficult for some new mommies. It’s oftentimes difficult to find a comfortable position to stay in for the duration of the feeding and baby can become frustrated, and irritable if not getting that milk flow immediately.

Because experience can be helpful we asked over a dozen “well-endowed” mamas who were successful breastfeeding for advice on how they made breastfeeding with large breasts work for them.

They gave practical and actionable tips that may totally change where you are with breastfeeding, making things better.Here we go for tips to make your breastfeeding journey easier:

  1. You have to be really comfortable and using a big pillow and a small, rolled-up burp cloth under the boob.
  2. An infant neck pillow works great for cleavage support while nursing
  3. Lay on your back with your baby on top of you with a pillow under your arm for support
  4. Use a nursing pillow! It can be a game changer and you can still use it at 6 months. Some mothers found it to be the last resort before they give up breastfeeding.
  5. Using a big fluffy blanket. This is convenient because you can maneuver it any way you want.
  6. Laying down on my side is also great. It can provide good support for baby when she cannot stay on her side. Just roll up a blanket and put behind her.
  7. One mother informed:

“Honestly, I wear one of my regular bras and lift my breast out of the top and tuck the cup under. It holds my breast up, so once he’s latched I can have one hand free.”

-Crystal A.

8. Try the football hold or football hold, with a pillow on your side to hold up baby and pillow behind your back for support. Add pillows as you need them.

9.Side lying worked for some mothers or inverted side lying by rolling up a baby blanket and put it under your breast to help support it. As for nursing position I really liked laying in bed on my side, no stress on mommy’s shoulders or neck. Or a normal cross cradle hold with a bed pillow under baby for support.

10. Never smoosh your baby with your boobs. Try laying down on my side in bed and letting the girls lay straight out and bringing baby to my boob. Works very well . Learn the c-hold. The C-hold is one of the ways you can hold your breast while you’re latching your baby on. When you have larger breasts, the c-hold can help you to support your breast and aim your nipple toward your baby’s mouth. This breast hold may make latching on easier for your baby. (Paid link)

11. Breastfeed in front of a mirror. If it’s difficult to see your baby’s mouth and your nipple, try breastfeeding while sitting in front of or next to a mirror. The mirror can give you a better view of your breast and your baby’s latch

12.Soften your breasts if they are hard and full of breast milk. If your breasts are engorged and overfull, use a breast pump or hand express some of your breast milk before you begin breastfeeding. This will soften your breast and make it easier for your baby to latch on.

13.Treat engorgement and overabundant supply. Talk to your healthcare provider or a lactation consultant and learn how to manage these issues so they don’t lead to more serious complications.

14. See your baby’s doctor regularly for weight checks. Since breastfeeding issues such as low breast milk supply or overabundant breast milk supply can affect large-breasted women, you should have your baby’s growth monitored by their doctor. You want to be sure that your baby is getting enough breast milk, but also that they are not gaining too much weight too quickly.Follow your child’s lead. As your baby gets older, they may be able to get more breast milk at each feeding and wait a little longer between feedings. Pay attention to your baby’s hunger cues and weight gain to prevent overfeeding.

15. Ask for help. It’s OK to be worried and have questions, and it’s OK to ask those questions and seek help. Your doctor is always a good resource and starting point when you need help, so talk to her about your concerns. A lactation consultant or a breastfeeding support group can also provide encouragement and support.

16.Be prepared. If you can, take a breastfeeding class while you’re pregnant to learn different positions and holds. When you have little knowledge and information ahead of time, it can help you feel more comfortable and confident once your baby arrives.

17. Support your breasts. Large breasts full of breast milk are heavy. A supportive nursing bra will hold up the extra weight of your breasts and help prevent back pain. Your pre-breastfeeding bras will most likely be too small, so invest in a few nursing bras in your new size. You may even benefit from a bra fitting to get the right size, fit, and support. 

Can My Large Boobs Suffocate My Baby?

It can very well be a challenge to find a comfortable position where you can see your baby’s mouth and your nipple, making it harder to get the baby latched on correctly.1 It can also be awkward and uncomfortable to hold your breasts and your baby, especially if you are in pain from the delivery. Plus, you may be worried that your breasts are so big that they will block your child’s nose. You may also be afraid if it is your first child.

Many women with larger breasts worry that their breast will block their baby’s nose while breastfeeding. But don’t worry: If your baby’s nose gets blocked, they will stop breastfeeding, release the latch, open their mouth, and breathe. Even so, you may feel a little better if you try latching your baby on in an asymmetrical latch. This latch technique lifts the baby’s nose off of your breast.  Breastfeeding should become easier as you continue to practice. (Paid link)

Do Largers Breasts Mean More Milk?

Many women believe that if a woman has large breasts they will produce more milk.

Your breast size does not determine the amount of milk-making tissue you have or how much breast milk you will make.1 Women with large breasts could have a healthy supply of breast milk, an overabundant milk supply, or a low supply of breast milk

Low Breast Milk Supply

Certain conditions such as polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS), obesity, hypothyroidism, and insulin resistance can affect production of breast milk. It’s important to have your baby monitored by a doctor to ensure that they are gaining weight and growing well.

Too Much Breast Milk

Oversupply with large boobs can be a challenge

Too much breast milk supply can cause issues for both you and your baby. Too much milk can lead to breast engorgement and pain. Severe engorgement can make it very difficult for your baby to latch on.1 Your child may also gag and choke from a strong milk let-down and/or become fussy and gassy. You may consult a lactation specialist or professional to help you balance low or over production of milk. If you are tempted to formula feed, check out for professional advice before giving up. (Paid link)

Preview(opens in a new tab)

…and last but not least, don’t miss these breastfeeding freebies!

Free Nursing Pillows @PregnancyPillow.com – Full Body Maternity Pillow – Total Body Pregnancy Pillow


M294429 Use this code to get your treat.!

Breastfeeding with large breasts can be easy and you can do it. I hope you try some of these tips. Know that any problems you have, can be sorted out by your lactation professional for assistance. Remember the more you breastfeed, the more milk you will make. Enjoy your breastfeeding experience and ask God to help you as you try to do your best to breastfeed your baby. Consider joining our mailing list for more interesting posts.

But I have a quick question:

“What are you struggling with right now?”

Even if it’s something small. I’d love to hear more Thanks for visiting this site and all the best in your breastfeeding journey.

Breastfeeding And Your Baby’s Immune System: How To Build It Up


Breastfeeding your baby is one of the best things you can do to build up his immune system

Did you know your babies’ immune systems are not as strong as those of adults. Breastfeeding and vaccinating your baby will help protect them from a serious illness. This is one of the reasons why breastfeeding really is a good choice. Breast milk is the food naturally designed to best meet the needs of human babies. It has all the necessary nutrients, in just the right amounts, and is easy to digest. Beyond the nutritional benefits, here’s a great bonus: Breastmilk also helps build and support your baby’s immune system.

This website contains affiliate links, which means I earn money from products and services you purchase through my links.

What is the immune system?

The immune system is a network of cells and proteins that defends the body against infection.

If bacteria, a virus or other foreign substance enters the body, white blood cells identify it and produce antibodies and other responses to the infection. They also ‘remember’ the attack so they can fight it more easily next time.(Paid link)

A baby’s immune system is immature when they are born. It develops throughout life as they are exposed to different germs that can cause disease.

The immune system in babies: How Does It Work?

Antibodies are passed from mother to baby through the placenta during the third trimester (last 3 months of pregnancy). This gives the baby some protection when they are born. The type and amount of antibodies passed to the baby depends on the mother’s own level of immunity.

During birth, bacteria from the mother’s vagina is passed on to the baby. This helps to build the colony of bacteria in the gut that contributes to their immunity.

After birth, more antibodies are passed on to the baby in colostrum and in breast milk. But babies’ immune systems are still not as strong as adults’. Premature babies are at greater risk of infection because their immune systems are even more immature and they haven’t had as many antibodies passed to them from their mothers.

Babies produce their own antibodies every time they are exposed to a virus or germ, but it takes time for this immunity to fully develop.

The passive immunity passed on from the mother at birth also doesn’t last long and will start to decrease in the first few weeks and months after birth.

How to Boost Your Baby’s Immune System

Each time your baby gets sick, they are developing new antibodies that will protect them in the future. In the meantime, there are some important things you can do to protect your baby. Here is a handy list to keep in mind:

(Paid link)

Breastfeeding

Breast milk contains many elements that support your baby’s immune system. These include proteins, fats, sugars and antibodies and probiotics. When a mother comes into contact with germs, she develops antibodies to help her fight off the infection. These are passed to the baby in breast milk. As mothers and babies are usually exposed to similar germs, this means the baby is protected.

Breastfed babies have fewer infections and get better more quickly than formula-fed babies. However, breastfeeding cannot protect your baby from serious, life-threatening infections like polio, diphtheria or measles. Also, for mothers who are unable to breastfeed or who choose not to, infant formula is a healthy alternative.

What About Vaccination?

Vaccinating children is the safest and most effective way to protect them against serious disease.

Vaccination causes an immune response in the same way that a virus or bacteria would. It means that if your child comes into contact with the real disease in future, their immune system will recognise the germ and respond fast enough to fight off the disease or prevent serious complications.

Pregnant women are vaccinated for whooping cough in their third trimester so they will pass on immunity to their babies.

Your baby will have their first vaccinations at birth, then some more at 6 weeks, 4 months and 6 months and for the first few years of life.

Diet and supplements

Taking antibiotics can kill some of the gut bacteria that are important for immunity. Probiotics are often suggested as a way of boosting babies’ immunity after they have had antibiotics. Probiotics are safe to use in late pregnancy and after the baby is born. However, the evidence is mixed about if they have benefits for children or adults. Talk to your doctor before you consider giving probiotics to your baby.

In most cases, breast milk and formula provide all the vitamins and minerals your baby needs. Additional vitamin supplements are not recommended for babies.

Once your baby starts on solids, a variety of fresh foods including different types of pureed vegetables and fruits should be enough to keep the immune system healthy. Try to keep breastfeeding while you’re introducing solid food.

Bottom Line

Breastfeeding mothers need the support of everyone to sustain breastfeeding. Many persons can easily give up if they do not get the support they need. To help keep babies healthy, communities can take steps to support mothers who choose to breastfeed their babies. This can include offering paid leave and giving employees places and time to pump breast milk.

If you’re breastfeeding your baby or have any questions, never hesitate to talk with your pediatrician. If you can’t breastfeed, or for personal reasons choose not to, talk to your pediatrician about the many other ways to support your baby’s health. Remember, mama your choice to breastfeed is one of the best things you can do to build up your baby’s immune system.

BEFORE YOU GO GET- YOUR FREEBIES USING YOUR PROMOTIONAL CODE 551c29 @ Mother’s Lounge – For all of your Baby Needs

But I have a quick question:

“What are you struggling with right now? Even if it’s something small. I’d love to hear more.

Thank you for joining my email list.

Thank you for stopping by today and do visit again.

More Information​

Breastfeeding And Baby Weight Loss After Birth: What Is Normal?


Breastfed newborns can lose up to 10% of their body weight during the first week of life.1 After that, babies gain approximately 1 ounce each day. By the time they are two weeks old, newborns should be back to their birth weight or even weigh a little more.

It happens that you go to your healthcare provider and your baby is weighed a week after delivery. Your healthcare provider is concerned that your baby is losing weight as opposed to gaining weight. You are breastfeeding, I mean exclusively breastfeeding and your healthcare provider says to give the baby some formula.

Just so you know, Breast Fed Is Best Academy may earn commissions from shopping links.

You start to give tour baby formula but you also see where you are losing the battle for breastfeeding. Your little star does not seem interested in breastfeeding anymore and you are disappointed because you had planned to exclusively breastfeed. What is a new mom suppose to do? A newborn usually loses several grams of body mass a day in the first 3-5 days after birth before moving into an upward gain trend, experts say.

Breastfed newborns can lose up to 10% of their body weight during the first week of life.1 After that, babies gain approximately 1 ounce each day. By the time they are two weeks old, newborns should be back to their birth weight or even weigh a little more.

Your newborn is not getting enough breast milk and is losing too much weight if they:

  • Lose more than 10% of his birth weight
  • Continue to lose weight after the first week of life
  • Are still under their birth weight after two weeks. (Paid link)

Reasons Why Some Babies Lose Weight While Breastfeeding

There can be several reasons for you baby’s weight loss

Newborns who are breastfeeding can lose weight for a variety of reasons.

  • Not breastfeeding enough: It is important to put your baby to the breast at least every two to three hours to stimulate healthy milk supply and provide your baby with enough breast milk to gain weight.2
  • Incorrect breastfeeding latch: When your baby isn’t latching on correctly, they cannot efficiently remove enough milk to grow at a consistent, healthy rate.2
  • An issue with your baby’s ability to latch: If you have severely engorged breastslarge nipplesflat nipples, or inverted nipples, your child may have difficulty latching on. Babies can also have physical or neurological issues that interfere with their ability to latch on to the breast properly. Your baby will not be able to get enough milk without a good latch.
  • Incorrect use of a nipple shield:nipple shield can be a helpful breastfeeding tool when used correctly and under the supervision of a doctor or lactation consultant. However, nipple shields that are used incorrectly can prevent a baby from getting enough breast milk.
  • They can also cause a decrease in your milk supply.3
  • Sleepiness: Sleepy newborns need to be aroused for feedings every two to three hours. Breastfeeding a sleepy baby can be a challenge, but it’s very important to make sure that your baby is nursing often and getting enough breast milk to gain weight.
  • Late onset of milk production: A difficult birth, stress, or a retained placenta are some of the causes of a delay in milk production. Until your breasts fill up with milk, your baby will not gain weight.
  • True low milk supply: Certain physical or hormonal issues such as hypoplastic breasts, PCOS, hypothyroidism, or previous breast surgery, can cause low milk supply. If your milk does not come in by the fourth day postpartum, talk to your doctor and have an examination. In some cases, a true low milk supply can be corrected with treatment.4

What to Do If Your Baby Is Losing Weight?

There are many good choices to make

If your baby is losing weight or not gaining weight as expected, you shouldn’t wait to ask for help. Your health and the baby’s health should be assessed, and you may need a lactation consultant. If a newborn is not back to birth weight by about 2 weeks of age talk to your primary care provider as this may indicate a possible concern. (Paid link)

Getting breastfeeding off to a good start can make all the difference in how successful you will be.5 Plus, correcting any issues right away helps to ensure your baby will get enough nutrition and fluids to stay hydrated and begin to gain weight. So if your breastfed baby is losing weight:

  • Have your baby’s latch evaluated by your nurse, a doctor, a lactation consultant, or a local breastfeeding support group.
  • See your doctor. Find out if there is a physical or hormonal issue that might be interfering with your breast milk supply.
  • Take your baby to the doctor to check for an illness or any other problems that could be interfering with breastfeeding. Infections, tongue-tie, jaundice, and other newborn issues can cause poor nursing and weight loss in infants.
  • Monitor your baby’s weight. Weigh them regularly at home.
  • Monitor your baby’s diapers. Keep track of how many wet diapers and bowel movements your baby is having each day.
  • Breastfeed your baby very often, at least every two to three hours around the clock. If you have a sleepy baby, wake them up to breastfeed every three hours.
  • Breastfeed longer at each nursing session.
  • Increase your breast milk supply by pumping. You can also ask your doctor or a lactation consultant about the use of galactagogues. Certain herbs, foods, and nursing teas may be helpful to increase a low milk supply.

If your baby continues to lose weight, it may be necessary to supplement. Talk to your doctor about continuing to breastfeed along with supplementation. A nursing supplementer device can be used to be sure your baby is getting enough breast milk or formula while still nursing at your breast.

Is there a specific timeline parents should track when it comes to their baby’s healthy weight?

Generally, full-term newborn babies lose weight for about the first 3-5 days after being born before starting to gain. Typical newborn weight gain is about 30-35 grams per day. The baby’s primary care provider will be following the baby’s weight and looking for him or her to be back to birth weight by about 2 weeks of age.

In Some Cases Supplementation May Be Needed

Mama it is ok if supplement is the last resort

While some weight loss in the initial week of a child’s life can be normal, it’s very important that people start to discuss the fact that sometimes it is necessary to supplement a newborn’s feed with formula. There are so many reasons why a woman might have low or late milk supply, but the baby still needs to eat, even if the mother intends to breastfeed.

Unfortunately, the ‘breast is best’ dialogue doesn’t leave much room for these complicated scenarios. If a baby has lost more than 10% of their birth weight, it is dangerous to continue to attempt to breastfeed as their only source of nutrition. While many breastfeeding enthusiasts insist that a baby will bounce back once the milk comes in, the situation can quickly get out of hand if you have a severely dehydrated or undernourished baby.

If you are bringing your first child home with intentions of breastfeeding, you should still have a box of formula on hand in the event that your baby needs it. This isn’t to discourage you from your breastfeeding intentions, but it does bring peace of mind to know that if your baby needs a little boost, it’s available.

In some hospitals, nurses offer formula ‘supplements’ to newborns if a parent requests them. Though many other birthing centers still advocate for exclusive breastfeeding, the choice should be made by the parent (including the choice to not breastfeed at all!)

The shame and lack of support surrounding non-breastfeeding (or mixed feeding) exacerbate the risks for newborn dehydration and malnourishment since a mother is less likely to visit a doctor if she feels personally responsible for her child’s inability to feed.

Bottom Line

When a baby is born, parents are also born. With this new role comes new skills and capabilities, and one of them is a parental instinct. If you feel uncomfortable or worried about your baby’s weight, follow through and make a phone call to your pediatrician or midwife.

It’s better to be over vigilant in the first few weeks of your baby’s life than under vigilant. If you are super stressed as you try to breastfeed and your baby is clearly not getting fed, open the dialogue about formula. Having an inconsolable, hungry baby on your hands can be a very big stress for a new mom, and can lead to feelings of discouragement and despair.

Feed your baby, whatever that means for you! Forget the judgments of others. At the end of the day, navigating the early weeks of parenthood can be really tough. Stay calm and alert. Do not mind the judgements of others. Do what is best for you and your family. That is what matters.

A worry free pregnancy is what you need

IF YOU ARE STILL PREGNANT: SUBSCRIBE FOR YOUR EXCITING FREE EBOOK FOR A WORRY FREE PREGNANCY @ https://exciting-producer-2227.ck.page/d386076124 NOW!! ENJOY!!

Breastfeeding, Influenza, And The Common Cold: How To Bounce Back


Its Ok for Mom to breastfeed with the common cold or influenza

Hello Mamas! I have great news! Guess what? According to the Centers for Disease Control, breast milk provides protections against many respiratory diseases, including influenza (flu). A mother with suspected or confirmed flu should take all possible precautions to avoid spreading the virus to her infant while continuing to provide breast milk to her infant. Influenza and the common cold are both respiratory illnesses but they are caused by different viruses. These two types of illnesses have similar flu-like symptoms. There is no cure for the common cold.

Just so you know, Breast Fed Is Best Academy may earn commissions from shopping links.

What Causes the Common Cold?

Though there are more than 100 viruses that can cause the common cold, the rhinovirus is the most common cause, and it’s highly contagious. The virus enters your body through your mouth, eyes or nose and can spread through droplets in the air when someone who is sick coughs, sneezes or talks. It also spreads by contact with someone who has a cold or by sharing contaminated objects, like utensils, towels, toys or telephones.

Handwashing is important in the prevention of spreading a cold. If you have not washed your hands after you touch a contaminated object and you then touch your eyes, nose or mouth, you will be likely to catch a cold. (Paid link)

Symptoms of a common cold usually appear about 1-3 days after exposure and may include:

  • Runny or stuffy nose
  • Itchy or sore throat
  • Cough
  • Congestion
  • Slight body aches or a mild headache
  • Sneezing
  • Watery eyes
  • Low-grade fever
  • Mild fatigue

Influenza (also called flu) is an acute respiratory tract illness caused by influenza viruses that infect the nose, throat, and lungs, causing a contagious respiratory illness. Flu can cause mild to severe illness, and at times can lead to death. Pregnant women and young children, among others (e.g., adults 65 years of age and older, people with certain medical conditions) are at high risk of developing flu-related complications.

Can the flu be transmitted through breast milk?

No. Flu is not spread to infants through breast milk. The flu is spread mainly from person-to-person via respiratory droplets when people cough, sneeze, or talk, or possibly, when a person touches a surface or object that has the flu virus on it and then touches their own mouth or nose.

Should mothers continue breastfeeding if they have flu or come in contact with someone with flu?

Yes. A mother’s breast milk contains antibodies and other immunological factors that can help protect her infant from flu and is the recommended source of nutrition for the infant, even while the mother is ill. If a mother is too sick to feed her infant at the breast and another healthy caregiver is caring for the infant, the breastfeeding mother should be encouraged and supported to regularly express her milk so that the infant continues to receive her breast milk. Prior to expressing breast milk, mothers should wash their hands well with soap and water and, if using a pump, follow recommendations for proper cleaning. Because breast milk supply could decrease for some mothers while they are ill, mothers may need additional lactation support from a lactation provider to address milk supply concerns, reduce the possibility of developing a breast infection, and support the breastfeeding relationship during this time.

Can infants who have flu continue to breastfeed?

Absolutely yes. When an infant has flu, the mother should be encouraged to continue breastfeeding or feeding expressed breast milk to her infant. Infants who are ill need fluids to stay hydrated and breast milk is the best option. Expressed breast milk can also be given from a cup, syringe, or bottle if the infant is unable to breastfeed directly at the breast.

Are there special considerations for mothers with flu in peri- and postpartum healthcare settings?

Yes. Newborns infected with influenza viruses are at increased risk for severe complications, including death. CDC has specific recommendations that apply to mothers who have flu and their newborns in the hospital setting at the time of birth. Visit Guidance for the Prevention and Control of Influenza in the Peri- and Postpartum Settings for more information.

If direct breastfeeding is interrupted due to temporary separation of mother and child, the breastfeeding mother should be encouraged and supported to regularly express her milk so that the infant continues to receive her breast milk. A breastfeeding mother with flu may need access to a hospital-grade pump and additional lactation support while in the hospital and after discharge to maintain her milk supply and reduce the possibility of developing a breast infection. Prior to expressing breast milk, mothers should wash their hands well with soap and water and, if using a pump, follow recommendations for proper cleaning. If a mother is expressing breast milk, the expressed breast milk should be fed to the infant by a healthy caregiver who does not have flu, if possible.

How can a breastfeeding mother with flu protect her infant from getting sick?

Handwashing is a safety precaution for baby

A mother with flu should take precautions to avoid spreading flu to her infant (regardless of feeding method) because infants are at high-risk of serious flu-related complications.

  • These precautions are especially important for infants younger than 6 months of age because they cannot be vaccinated against influenza viruses. Mothers with flu should thoroughly wash and dry their hands with soap and water before touching the infant or any item that the infant will touch (including during feeding) and anytime they sneeze or cough on their hands.
  • Breast milk remains the best source of nutrition for the infant, and provides protection from infections through antibodies and other immunological factors.
  • If a mother is too sick to feed her infant at the breast, if possible, expressed breast milk should be fed to the infant by a healthy caregiver who does not have flu.
  • Whenever a mother expresses her breast milk, she should wash her hands well with soap and water and, if using a pump, follow recommendations for proper cleaning.

How can caregivers prevent transmission of flu to infants?

  • Immunization of pregnant and breastfeeding women pdf icon[PDF-732KB] reduces the risk of flu to themselves and to their infants.
  • To protect infants, especially those younger than 6 months of age who cannot be vaccinated, parents, siblings, other household members aged 6 months and older, and other caregivers should also receive an annual flu vaccination (except in rare cases).
  • Everyday preventive actions such as avoiding close contact with sick persons, covering one’s nose and mouth with a tissue when sneezing or coughing and throwing the tissue away immediately afterwards, practicing proper hand hygiene, and disinfecting surfaces can also help protect all infants from flu, whether they are breastfed or not.
  • Breast milk is the best source of nutrition for infants and provides protection from infections through antibodies and other immunological factors.
  • Infants who are breastfed are less vulnerable to infections, including severe respiratory illnesses, than infants who are not breastfed.
  • When a mother has flu, her breast milk contains antibodies that can help protect her infant from flu and breast milk remains the recommended source of nutrition for the infant, even while the mother is ill.

Is the flu vaccine safe for breastfeeding mothers and their infants?

Absolutely yes. Flu vaccination is safe for breastfeeding women and their infants aged 6 months and older. In fact, women who get the flu vaccine while pregnant or breastfeeding develop antibodies against flu that they can share with their infants through their breast milk. Breastfeeding can provide some protection against flu for infants, including children younger than 6 months who cannot receive the flu vaccine. Annual flu vaccination is recommended for all persons aged 6 months and older (except in rare cases), and is particularly important for pregnant women. Additionally, to protect children younger than 6 months of age from flu, persons around the infant (e.g., caregivers and household members) should receive the flu vaccination. (Paid link).

What about influenza antiviral prescription medications safety use while mothers are breastfeeding or providing expressed breast milk to their infants?

Absolutely yes. While data on the effect of currently recommended influenza antiviral medications during breastfeeding are limited, CDC recommends that postpartum (e.g., within 2 weeks after birth) women with suspected or confirmed flu be treated with antiviral medications since they are at high risk of flu complications. For women who are breastfeeding with suspected or confirmed flu, treatment with oral oseltamivir is currently preferred. Available data indicate that oseltamivir is poorly excreted in breast milk. See Table 1. For additional information on medications and lactation, please refer to the Drugs and Lactation Database (LactMed)external icon. For additional general information on flu antiviral medications for healthcare providers, please visit the Influenza (Flu) Antiviral Drugs website.

Complications of the Common Cold

Ear pain could signal an ear infection and an evaluation by a provider is recommended. The common cold can also exacerbate asthma symptoms with wheezing and difficulty breathing, which should prompt a call and/or visit to your provider. Also, if you have a fever along with sinus pain, difficulty breathing or discomfort when taking a deep breath, this could signal a secondary infection like sinusitis or pneumonia. Throat pain with white patches can be a sign of strep throat and will require a visit to your provider. If you have a high fever of more than 103 degrees, dehydration, severe fatigue and/or body aches, see a doctor immediately, especially if you are pregnant.

Recommendations For Feeling Better

When treating the common cold or influenza, it is good to treat the symptoms to help you feel better.

  • Getting plenty of rest
  • Drinking plenty of fluids (especially water)
  • Gargling with warm salt water
  • Using cough drops, lozenges or throat sprays
  • Watch your temperature -check every 4 hours
  • Avoid hot fluids
  • Take tepid water baths from tap for temperature above 10o degrees.
  • Wash hands frequently when needed. Avoid other members of the family. (Paid link)

In addition, here are some over-the-counter cold medications that can help: I advise that you get your doctors ok or permission to take any of them and let your doctor know that you are breastfeeding. Some cold medications can reduce your milk supply.

  • Acetaminophen (Tylenol): Take for body aches and headaches, mild pain and fever. If you are pregnant then you CANNOT take ibuprofen or naproxen but these medications are safe if you are breastfeeding.
  • Pseudoephedrine or phenylephrine (Sudafed): Use for congestion and runny nose. Medications that contain pseudoephedrine are kept behind the pharmacy counter and have restrictions on the quantity that you can purchase. You must show ID to prove you are older than 18.
  • Guaifenesin (Mucinex) or dextromethorphan (Robutussin): This medicine suppresses coughing and thins mucus so that coughs are more productive
  • Diphenhydramine (Benadryl), Loratidine (Claritin): Can relieve watery eyes and itchy throat. These can also make you sleepy, so it may be better to take at night to aid with rest.

Bottom Line

It is so good to know that breastfeeding does not have to stop if mommy or baby has the cold or flu. The flu vaccine is safe for all mothers. Discuss with your doctor which medications are the safest to take when you have the cold or flu. If you do happen to catch the cold or flu, remember to take good care of yourself. I pray to God that you get well soon. Ask God to heal your body as you recover. Thank you for stopping by and do visit again.

Let your pregnancy be worry-free forever

IF YOU ARE STILL PREGNANT: SUBSCRIBE FOR YOUR EXCITING FREE EBOOK FOR A WORRY FREE PREGNANCY @ https://exciting-producer-2227.ck.page/d386076124 NOW!! ENJOY!!

Breastfeeding And Your Newborn: How To Cope With The First Weeks


Breastfeeding can be very challenging during the first few weeks, but planning can make a difference

Frequent nursing encourages good milk supply and reduces engorgement. Aim for nursing at least  8– 12 times per day (24 hours). You CAN’T nurse too often–you CAN nurse too little. Remember the more you nurse the more milk

Just so you know, Breast Fed Is Best Academy may earn commissions from shopping links.

Nurse at the first signs of hunger (stirring, rooting, hands in mouth)–don’t wait until baby is crying. Allow baby unlimited time at the breast when sucking actively, then offer the second breast. Some newborns are excessively sleepy at first–wake baby to nurse if 2 hours (during the day) or 4 hours (at night) have passed without nursing.

Breast changes

Your milk should start to “come in” (increase in quantity and change from colostrum to mature milk) between days 2 and 5. To minimize engorgement: nurse often, don’t skip feedings (even at night), ensure good latch/positioning, and let baby finish the first breast before offering the other side. To decrease discomfort from engorgement, use cold and/or cabbage leaf compresses between feedings. If baby is having trouble latching due to engorgement, use reverse pressure softening or express milk until the nipple is soft, then try latching again. Breastfeed every 2-3 hours and pump immediately afterwards. Always keep in mind the more you breastfeed the more milk you make.

How often should baby be nursing?

After giving birth life can seem pretty bewildering – you’re getting to know your newborn while recovering from the delivery. Your emotions might be all over the place (especially between days two and five when many women get the double whammy of their milk ‘coming in’1 and the ‘baby blues’.2 Plus, there’s often expectation – and pressure – to be up and about quickly and generally be a supermom. But one of the most super things you can do this week is just be with your baby and get breastfeeding on track. Some newborns are excessively sleepy—wake baby to nurse if 2 hours (during the day) or 4 hours (at night) have passed without nursing. Once baby has established a good weight gain pattern, you can stop waking baby and nurse on baby’s cues alone.

Is baby getting enough milk?

See your healthcare provider for any weight loss issues you may have

Weight gain: Normal newborns may lose up to 7% of birth weight in the first few days. After mom’s milk comes in, the average breastfed baby gains 6 oz/week (170 g/week). Take baby for a weight check at the end of the first week or beginning of the second week. Consult with baby’s doctor and your lactation consultant if baby is not gaining as expected.

Dirty diapers: In the early days, baby typically has one dirty diaper for each day of life (1 on day one, 2 on day two…). After day 4, stools should be yellow and baby should have at least 3-4 stools daily that are the size of a US quarter (2.5 cm) or larger. Some babies stool every time they nurse, or even more often–this is normal, too. The normal stool of a breastfed baby is loose (soft to runny) and may be seedy or curdy.

Wet diapers: In the early days, baby typically has one wet diaper for each day of life (1 on day one, 2 on day two…). Once mom’s milk comes in, expect 5-6+ wet diapers every 24 hours. To feel what a sufficiently wet diaper is like, pour 3 tablespoons (45 mL) of water into a clean diaper. A piece of tissue in a disposable diaper will help you determine if the diaper is wet.

“Ideally, your baby will be put on your chest as soon as he’s born to give him access to the breast. He might feed, he might not; but give him the opportunity to do so,” says Cathy Garbin, an internationally renowned lactation consultant.

“Support his body and let him attempt to find his way to your breast and self-attach (you can watch videos of this process, called the ‘breast crawl’, online). However, if your baby doesn’t attach, healthcare professionals are usually very skilled at helping mums with positioning. Baby-led attachment, with mum in a semi-reclined breastfeeding position, is a good way to start.”

So forget about weighing and dressing your baby in that special first hour, or at least until after the first breastfeed. Enjoy relaxed cuddles and plenty of naked skin-to-skin contact with him. This will get oxytocin – ‘the love hormone’ – flowing in both of you, which is essential for the release of your first milk, colostrum.3

What If I have A Caesarean Section?

Having a C-section does not mean you cannot be successful in breastfeeding

If you have a c-section or there are other complications, you may still be able to have skin-to-skin time with your baby and breastfeed in the first few hours.

“If you aren’t able to hold your baby, the next best thing is for him to have skin-to-skin contact with your partner instead. This will help keep your baby feeling safe, loved and warm until you’re ready,” says Cathy.

If your baby is unable to breastfeed, then it’s a good idea to start expressing your milk early and frequently until he is able. “While breastfeeding directly as soon as possible gives mum and baby a good start, it’s not essential,” reassures Cathy. “What’s more important is to initiate your milk supply so you can work towards breastfeeding later if needed.”

You can hand express and use the hospital breast pump to help initiate your milk supply in the beginning.5 The precious colostrum you collect can then be given to your baby. This is especially important if he is premature or poorly, because your breast milk has so many wonderful health benefits.

Don’t feel like breastfeeding is unachievable if your baby arrives early or has medical complications that stop him feeding at the start, either. “I’ve worked with many, many mums where their baby hasn’t breastfed directly from the breast at all in the first six weeks due to a premature arrival or other difficulties.

A Good Latch Is A Set Up For Successful Breastfeeding

If you are having issues with your baby latch,seek professional help

Good attachment is crucial for getting breastfeeding off to a good start,6 as your baby’s latch affects how well he drinks the milk and consequently how he grows and develops. A poor latch can cause sore or damaged nipples, so never worry about asking a healthcare professional to check your attachment, even if you’ve been told the latch is fine and you don’t notice an obvious problem – especially while you’re still at your birth facility.

“Every time I fed in hospital, I buzzed a midwife to check the latch,” says Emma, mum of two, Australia. “There were a few times I thought I had it right but it was painful and the midwife helped take my baby off and do it properly. It meant I had the confidence to do that at home.”

When your baby is latching on, aim your nipple towards the roof of his mouth. This way he will latch on to the nipple, as well as some of the areola beneath it. This means he can draw both the nipple and some breast tissue into his mouth and feed well.6

“The latch should feel pretty comfortable and like a tugging sensation rather than a pain,” says Cathy. “Your baby will have his mouth wide open. His bottom lip may be flanged outwards, but his top lip will rest comfortably on your breast. His body language will show he is comfortable. There’s not going to be a large volume of milk at this early stage, so you won’t see much swallowing, although your baby will be sucking a lot and feeding lots of times.”

Mamas The following Things Are Normal: Do Not Give Baby Formula If You Intend To Breastfeed Exclusively

Never swap formula for exclusive breastfeeding

Many mothers shorten their breastfeeding journey by thinking baby is hungry during the early 2 weeks. I have counselled many mothers who succumbed to formula exposure. Mamas all you have to do is continue to breastfeed as long as baby is sucking. Lets look at the following events that most babies go through: Remember these events are only temporary.

  • Frequent and/or long feedings.
  • Varying nursing pattern from day to day.
  • Cluster nursing (very frequent to constant nursing) for several hours—usually evenings—each day. This may coincide with the normal “fussy time” that most babies have in the early months.
  • Growth spurts, where baby nurses more often than usual for several days and may act very fussy. Common growth spurt times in the early weeks are the first few days at home, 7 – 10 days, 2 – 3 weeks and 4 – 6 weeks.

Sleep When Baby Sleeps

When they say to sleep while baby is sleeping, it is definitely true that you should! This is NOT just a friendly piece of advice to pamper the new mom – it is a necessity. Your endorphins/adrenaline will carry you for about a week before you crash – hard. Don’t let that happen – get help from family and friends, and focus on recovering from childbirth and on breastfeeding.

Preparation Is Key: (PAID LINKS ARE HERE) at least 2 good supportive nursing bras, nursing pads, 100% purified lanolin for sore nipples, pajamas with easy access for nursing (not necessarily expensive nursing pajamas, even pajamas with button up or pull up tops will do), and frozen peas/gel packs and cabbage to ease any breast engorgement/soreness/inflammation. This is the bare minimum equipment; some moms also find it helpful to have a rocker, a sling, a pump, breastmilk storage bottles or bags, a nursing pillow, or other items, but you can do fine without these, too.

GET IT ON: Breastfeed your baby as soon as possible after you deliver. Babies who are breastfed within the first hour generally have more successful breastfeeding experiences than those who aren’t. Any medical procedures that aren’t urgent may be delayed to accommodate this important first step, and many procedures can be done while the baby is breastfeeding.

Bottom Line:

Bringing your baby home is simply wonderful. Choosing to breastfeed is indeed one of the best decisions you can make for your family. Breast changes will occur. I encourage you to breastfeed for 2-3 hours and aim for 8times ensuring a good latch. Determine that your baby is getting enough by paying attention to those soiled nappies. Your baby will have growth spurts that call for more breastfeeding; not the need for formula. Sleep when your baby is sleeping and know that the more you breastfeed, the more milk you will make and the less you breastfeed, the less milk you will make. Even if you had a C-section you can still breastfeed. Thank you for stopping by today and do visit again. Let me know in the comments how you are doing with this journey.

IF YOU ARE PREGNANT: SUBSCRIBE FOR YOUR EXCITING FREE EBOOK FOR THE BEST PREGNANCY EVER SIGN UP NOW!!!! ENJOY!! https://exciting-producer-2227.ck.page/d386076124