Breastfeeding And Galactagogues: Mamas, Lets Make More Milk!


Keep in mind that taking certain herbs while breastfeeding can have adverse effects. Before adding them to your diet in the hopes of increasing your milk supply, it’s important to consult your doctor.

I have nursed four babies and have never needed to take anything to boost my milk supply. However, I am aware that there may be some of you out there who may need a little help. First, what is a galactagogue?  It is a long word meaning “a substance that increases milk supply”. Herbs and medications that increase your milk supply are known as galactagogues (ga-lac-ti-gogs). If your milk supply is low, you might want to try using a natural foods, galactagogues or even prescription medication to help increase your milk production. The word “galactagogues” comes from the Greek “galacta,” meaning milk.

The best way to increase your milk supply is to take galactagogues while you increase the number of times you pump and breastfeed your baby. Note that breastfeeding mothers have been taking galactagogues throughout history to increase milk supply. I recommend you try the natural foods and pumping 8-10 times per day, and breastfeeding . Remember a pump cannot substitute for your little star’s sucking. It is the next best thing to do while breastfeeding is being established. Our aim when we use galactagogues in one main goal and that is to increase milk supply.

What About Beer And Alcohol?

Approximately 15% of breastfeeding women use herbs when they feel they need to increase their milk production. However, with the exception of Fenugreek, most of these herbal galactagogues have not been studied much to see if they do increase milk supply.  And while beer or alcohol is a traditional folk remedy for low milk supply, current studies indicate alcohol consumption is more likely to decrease infant consumption of milk than increase it (source). We really do not want your infant consumption to decrease. So this is something you should consider.

Herbal galactagogues: Can Be Very Effective

Some of the most well-known and anecdotally effective galactagogues are herbal. Tens of herbs are believed to increase breast milk for nursing mothers.

Many of these herbs stimulate mammary growth as well as provide hormonal support. Fenugreek, one of the most well-known galactagogues, is a Middle Eastern spice. Nettleblessed thistle, and ginger are other popular herbs that are thought to improve milk production.

Keep in mind that taking certain herbs while breastfeeding can have adverse effects. Before adding them to your diet in the hopes of increasing your milk supply, it’s important to consult your doctor.

Fenugreek

There are many common herbal supplements available that have been shown to be effective for increasing your milk production. Fenugreek is likely the most commonly used galactagogue. A seed extract that can quickly increase milk supply, the recommended daily dose is 3.5-6 grams depending on your doctor’s or lactation consultant’s advice. Some women notice they have a maple syrup smell when taking fenugreek. It may also cause contractions or an allergic reaction, do not take fenugreek if you are pregnant or allergic to peanuts or soybeans. (Paid link here)

Blessed Thistle

This plant has been used as a medicine for hundreds of years and has been shown to increase milk supply. It works best when taken in combination with fenugreek. It comes in capsule or tea form and should be taken three times per day.

Alfalfa

A type of pea, alfalfa has a mild effect on increasing milk supply and is often used in combination with fenugreek. You can take alfalfa in pill, tea, or food form. Alfalfa sprouts have a pleasant, nutty flavor and have a number of health benefits. You can also make tea from alfalfa leaves or take as a tablet.

Goat’s Rue

This herb can be a powerful galactagogue and is often taken along with a blend of fenugreek and other herbs. Do not use it in its fresh format as it is considered toxic; use only commercially prepared dry leaves for tea or capsules. These herbal supplements are readily available online or at your local health food store. Talk to your doctor or lactation consultant before taking any supplements, particularly if you have allergies or are taking any prescription medications.

Let A Galactagogue Be Your Last Resort

Mama give these tips a try first

If you’re concerned about your milk supply, the first step is to contact a certified health professional to help you.

It may turn out that you’re worrying unnecessarily, and that both your milk supply and your baby are just fine. If your supply is on the low side, a lactation consultant will be able to make recommendations for improving production.

These might include:

  • Skin-to-skin contact, which will release prolactin and stimulate oxytocin, two hormones that can help milk production
  • Breast compression, a method of gently squeezing the breast as you nurse to encourage milk glands to let down more milk
  • Comfortable positioning during breastfeeding
  • Frequent feedings or regular pumping sessions- 8-10 times per day or every 2-3 hours.
  • Pumping sufficient milk to meet you little star’s needs.
  • Drinking lots of fluids- Never allow your body to get thirsty.

Most women will find that these methods are enough to improve milk production. Give them a try first.

It’s also important to avoid habits and behaviors that can inhibit your milk supply, such as:

The cold and allergy medications can reduce your milk supply if you are on them a long time, but if you need them, its ok to get you well again. Make sure that you discuss with your healthcare provider.

Master Your Diet for Good Nutrition

The LLLI, nursing mothers is of the persuasion that breastfeeding mothers  don’t need special diets to produce milk for their babies. Instead of worrying about incorporating certain foods, La Leche advises following a healthy, sensible diet.

Try to include:

 Green papaya

This galactagogue is prized in Asia for its enzymes, vitamins, and minerals. It’s a particularly good source of vitamin A and vitamin C.

One small fruit contains nearly 100 milligrams (mg)Trusted Source of vitamin C. For women who are lactating, the recommended dietary allowance of vitamin C is only 115 to 120 mg each day.

Note that green papaya is the unripe fruit. It must be simmered until it’s soft enough to eat.

Fennel and fennel seed

The fennel seed is widely considered to increase milk production. The vegetable, which can be eaten raw or cooked, may also help. Discover other benefits of fennel. (Paid link here)

Grains

In addition to their reputed antibiotic and anti-inflammatory properties, oats are a well-known comfort food. It’s thought that eating something associated with comfort may cause a woman’s body to release oxytocin, a hormone involved in the production of milk.

Other grains that may function as possible galactagogues include milletbrown rice, and barley.

Chickpeas and lentils

Legumes, such as chickpeas and lentils, have long been touted for their milk-boosting properties.

Brewer’s yeast

Also known as nutritional yeast, brewer’s yeast is a good source of protein and iron. It also contains phytoestrogens, which may help with breast tissue health and lactation.

Nuts

Raw nuts, including cashewswalnuts, and macadamia nuts, are also believed to support the production of milk. (Paid link here)

Sesame seeds

Another Asian galactagogue, sesame seeds are a vegan source of calcium. Black or light-colored sesame seeds will work, as will tahini, a creamed version of the seed.

Lactation cookies

Recipes for lactation cookies often combine flax seeds, brewer’s yeast, oats, and other purported milk-boosting ingredients to get a delicious treat.(Here is the paid link to purchase your delicious lactation cookies)

Bottom line

Mamas there is nothing like breastfeeding your baby directly from the the breast. Breastfeeding your baby consistently is truly the best way to increase your milk supply. No foods or herbs have been reliably shown to increase milk production. There have however been many testimonies of moms who testify that their milk supply have increased as a result of taking these herbs. I sure hope your breastfeeding However, most of the foods listed above are nutritious and safe to add to your daily diet.

I hope your milk production is getting better and better as time goes on. Thanks for stopping by today. Do visit again. Please like, or comment. I would love to hear from you. Remember God loves you. Ask for His help in all things. Before adding specific galactagogues to your diet, be sure to discuss them with your doctor. This website contains affiliate links, which means I earn a small commission  from products and services you purchase through my links at no extra cause to you.


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Breastfeeding And The Covid -19 Vaccine: What Are The Risks?


Decisions must be made regarding the breastfeeding mother

This website contains affiliate links, which means I earn a small commission  from products and services you purchase through my links at no extra cause to you

The guidance could affect hundreds of thousands of women, including an estimated 20,000 frontline workers. About 46% of mothers in England were breastfeeding babies aged 6-8 weeks in 2018/19.

Dr Vicky Thomas of the Hospital Infant Feeding Network (HIFN) said she understood concerns but underlined the fact that there was “no evidence this vaccine would be harmful to breastfeeding mothers or their children and the risk seems to many to be minimal”. On 11th December, 2020 the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued the first emergency use authorization (EUA) for the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine to be used on people 16 and older in the United States. As the proposed timeline for distribution for the vaccine for adults begins to become clearer, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) also shared their guidance on the use of the vaccine for special populations — including pregnant and breastfeeding people.

(Paid link here)

For Soon – to -Be – Moms: Risk Is Low Without Complications!

Though the data on pregnant people shows that their absolute risk is low, per the CDC, there is an increased risk of these patients becoming severely ill (meaning potentially being admitted to an ICU, needing mechanical ventilation) if they do get COVID-19 or an increased risk of preterm birth or other adverse pregnancy outcomes. They note that while there’s no available data on pregnant people receiving any of the COVID-19 vaccines being tested right now — including the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine — studies on this demo are planned.

Do Pregnant Mothers Have A Choice In Choosing the Covid Vaccine ?

Absolutely! women’s rights and breastfeeding organisations are challenging government and NHS guidance that the groups say forces mothers to choose between feeding their infants in the way that they choose and protecting themselves from Covid by being vaccinated.

The NHS website advises lactating mothers to wait until they have stopped breastfeeding before having the Covid-19 vaccine. It adds: “There’s no evidence it’s unsafe if you’re pregnant or breastfeeding. But more evidence is needed before you can be offered the vaccine.”

The UK government website repeats the advice, saying it was “precautionary until additional evidence is available to support the use of this vaccine in pregnancy and breastfeeding”. There have been no trials of Covid vaccines on breastfeeding women. Dr Vicky Thomas of the Hospital Infant Feeding Network (HIFN) said denying women the opportunity to be protected, or alternatively forcing them to lose the health impacts of breastfeeding for themselves and their children is yet another example of the way women have been disproportionately affected by Covid-19.”

Dr Hannah Barham Brown, the deputy leader of the Women’s Equality Party and a trainee GP, said: “The vaccine is our best defence against Covid. To insist without any evidence that certain women shouldn’t access it is completely irresponsible, especially as women make up the majority of essential workers in high-risk jobs.

What Are the Informed Choices Women Breastfeeding Will Have to Make?

“Unless the regulatory bodies reassess their position, women will face an unacceptable choice between giving up breastfeeding or putting themselves and those around them at risk. What breastfeeding mothers need is the right to make an informed choice.”

As for safety, these vaccines are believed to be “unlikely to pose a risk for people who are pregnant” because they are mRNA vaccines. Per the CDC, unlike other vaccines which put “a weakened or inactivated germ into our bodies” to trigger an immune response, mRNA vaccines instead “teach our cells how to make a protein—or even just a piece of a protein—that triggers an immune response inside our bodies. That immune response, which produces antibodies, is what protects us from getting infected if the real virus enters our bodies.”

So, based on this working knowledge, the agency says that pregnant people who are “part of a group that is recommended to receive a COVID-19 vaccine (e.g., healthcare personnel)” can choose to be vaccinated.

Who Are The Decision Makers In This Critical Matter?

“A conversation between the patient and their clinical team may assist with decisions regarding the use of vaccines approved under EUA for the prevention of COVID-19. While a conversation with a healthcare provider may be helpful, it is not required prior to vaccination,” per the CDC. “When making a decision, pregnant people and their healthcare providers should consider the level of COVID-19 community transmission, the patient’s personal risk of contracting COVID-19, the risks of COVID-19 to the patient and potential risks to the fetus, the efficacy of the vaccine, the side effects of the vaccine and the lack of data about the vaccine during pregnancy.

(Paid link)

Pregnant people who experience fever following vaccination may be counseled to take acetaminophen as fever has been associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. Acetaminophen may be offered as an option for pregnant people experiencing other post-vaccination symptoms as well. There is no recommendation for routine testing before receipt of a COVID-19 vaccine. Those who are trying to become pregnant do not need to avoid pregnancy after Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccination.” Women should be able to make informed decisions.

Is there any justice in the UK regulator’s decision?

There had been an “outpouring of anxiety” from frontline workers who were breastfeeding, with many feeling they had been “put in an impossible and discriminatory position because of the UK regulator’s decision”.

Joeli Brearley, founder of Pregnant Then Screwed, said some breastfeeding women had already been refused the vaccination. “Women are being forced into the position of giving up breastfeeding, giving up their career or putting themselves in grave danger, all because they are not considered a priority by drug companies or the regulators.”

Bottom line

The bottom line is no one knows the effects the covid-29 vaccine will have on the breastfeeding population. However, providing the breastfeeding woman with informed choices is key in giving them the power to choose. The choices can be hard either way. Women globally have been faced with tough decisions to make that are crucial to their future. Thank you for stopping by today. I hope you learned something. The Corona virus is very new to our world. We are still trying to understand this phenomena. I encourage you to ask God for His wisdom in helping you to make the best choice. (Paid link).


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Breastfeeding And Tongue Tie: Overcoming the Challenges


Tongue tie

Tongue tie can make it harder for babies to breastfeed (and sometimes bottle feed). It’s when the strip of tissue, called the ‘frenulum’ (attaching the tongue to the floor of the mouth) is shorter than normal. Tongue tie can prevent your baby from latching on properly – which can then lead to sore or cracked nipples.

Symptoms

Tongue tie can cause breastfeeding issues

Tongue tie is a condition no mother, especially a breastfeeding mother! No mother wants her baby to have this condition because it can cause issues for breastfeeding. It can even affect a child’s self esteem because it can make them talk a certain way that could be embarrassing. . Cases of tongue tie can range from mild to severe. If severe, the tongue may be completely fused to the floor of the mouth. You may be able to see if your newborn or baby has tongue tie by looking into their mouth when they’re yawning or crying, although it’s not always easy to spot. Signs of tongue tie in your baby might include:

  • your baby’s tongue doesn’t lift or move from side-to-side
  • their tongue may look heart-shaped when they stick it out
  • difficulty breastfeeding or bottle feeding (and weight gain may be slow)
  • frequent, long periods of feeding – but they seem unsettled and unsatisfied

There are many signs that a baby is having problems with breastfeeding and they may be related to tongue-tie:

  • nipple pain and damage
  • the nipple looks flattened after breastfeeding
  • you can see a compression/stripe mark on the nipple at the end of a breastfeed
  • the baby fails to gain weight well

You won’t necessarily have all these signs when you are having a problem and they can all be related to other breastfeeding problems and not necessarily related to tongue-tie. If you experience any of the signs above, you may wish to call the National Breastfeeding Helpline to speak with a breastfeeding counsellor or consider contacting a lactation consultant.

Can tongue tie affect breastfeeding?

Absolutely yes! Tongue-tie and breastfeeding. In some cases the tongue is not free or mobile enough for the baby to attach properly to the breast. Tongue-tie occurs in 4-11% of newborns and is more common in males. Some babies with tongue-tie are able to attach to the breast and suck well. However, many have breastfeeding problems, such as nipple damage.

A baby needs to be able to have good tongue function to be able to remove milk from the breast well. If the tongue is anchored to the floor of the mouth due to a tongue -tie, the baby cannot do this as well. The baby may not be able to take in a full mouthful of breast tissue. This can result in ‘nipple-feeding’ because the nipple is not drawn far enough back in the baby’s mouth and constantly rubs against the baby’s hard palate as he feeds. As a result, the mother is likely to suffer nipple trauma.

How does tongue tie affect breastfeeding mums?

However, many have breastfeeding problems, such as nipple damage, poor milk transfer and low weight gains in the baby, and possibly blocked ducts or mastitis due to ineffective milk removal. Why is a tongue-tie a problem for breastfeeding? A baby needs to be able to have good tongue function to be able to remove milk from the breast well.

  • your milk supply may reduce, as your baby is not latching on and feeding well
  • you may have sore or cracked nipples, which can make breastfeeding painful
  • poor latching on and ineffective feeding may lead to engorged breasts – which can then lead to mastitis

Not all babies with tongue tie have no problems at all. They may still be able to latch on and feed well – so not every case of tongue tie needs treatment.

If your baby does have tongue tie, it will hopefully be picked up in the first routine check by your midwife. However, tongue tie is not always easy to spot and may be discovered at a later stage (usually after feeding issues become apparent).

Diagnosis And Treatment

A website or virtual breastfeeding forum can’t diagnose a tongue-tie, your baby needs a face-to-face consultation with a specialist. A good place to start is by seeing an IBCLC lactation consultant who will take a full breastfeeding history—and assess both breastfeeding and tongue function. Your pediatrician can also diagnose tie tongue. Surgery is sometimes necessary.

If treatment is necessary, your baby will have a straightforward procedure called a ‘frenulotomy’. This is carried out by specially trained doctors, nurses or midwives – and is very quick (it takes a few seconds). Generally, no anaesthetic is used. The surgery simply involves snipping the short, tight piece of skin connecting the underside of the tongue to the floor of the mouth. As soon as it’s done, you can feed your baby (which helps to heal any bleeding).

Bottom Line

Tongue tie can certainly affect breastfeeding, making it harder for mothers to breastfeed. We know that no mother wants to discover that her newborn baby is tongue tied. Knowing the signs is the key to helping your baby to be diagnosed with the condition. There are varying degrees of tie tongue. Depending on the severity , surgery may be needed. I hope that you learned something today that will help you. Thank you for stopping by and do come again. Please like, or comment this post if you really like it and share. This website contains affiliate links, which means I earn a small commission  from products and services you purchase through my links at no extra cause to you.


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Breastfeeding And Diaper Rash: Easy Solutions To Avoid It


What Is Diaper Rash?

Diaper rash can be caused by so many agents. Lets learn all we can to keep nappy rash at bay!

You hear your baby crying hysterically, and you run to his rescue only to find that while changing his dirty nappy, he has a reddened rash on the buttocks. Your baby looks at you and cries the sign of relief that “I’m safe now ,my mommy is here.” This is the exact scenario I experienced with my baby. Hello Mamas! today we are going to learn about diaper rash and breastfeeding with easy solutions to avoid it. I want to encourage all the breastfeeding Mamas to breastfeed your child for as long as you can because diaper rash occurs less often in breastfed babies, although it isn’t completely clear why. (Paid link)

Diaper rash is characterized by bright red, inflamed skin on a baby’s bottom. Most parents attribute it to environmental factors, such as sensitivity to dyes or perfumes, infrequently changed diapers, and chafing. But did you know that itching and inflammation could actually be caused from something in your little one’s diet? Doctor Latanya Benjamin, M.D., clinical assistant professor of pediatrics and clinical assistant of dermatology at Stanford University Hospital in Palo Alto, California believes.

The Top Foods That Cause Diaper Rash

Citrus fruits and juices: These items are very acidic, which can be tough on Baby’s digestive system. Things to avoid include oranges, lemons, limes, grapefruits, and juices made from any type of citrus. 

Tomatoes and tomato-based products: Tomatoes are another highly acidic ingredient that can exaggerate symptoms of diaper rash. Your baby should also avoid spaghetti sauce, tomato soup, ketchup, and anything else that has a tomato base. 

Strawberries: Even though strawberries have a pleasing flavor, the acidity of the fruit can irritate your baby’s digestive system.

Pineapples and other tart fruits: Just because pineapple is acidic doesn’t mean your little star needs to avoid all tropical fruit. Consider trying mango or papaya instead.

What’s more, if your baby has frequent loose stools, she might develop diaper rash. It’s smart, then, to also avoid common diarrhea triggers such as dairy, fruit juice, peaches, plums, prunes, and more. My recommendation is to start with one fruit per week, instead of trying too many fruits at one time. By trying it one by one you can more easily define the culprit causing the diarrhea.

Conquering Diaper Rash Through Diet

Many babies are fed plenty of new foods when they start solids, which makes it hard to discern exactly what’s causing the negative reaction. Here’s a solution: Introduce new foods one at a time, then watch your baby for three to four days as her digestive system adapts. If you notice any negative reaction to the food, such as diaper rash, she might have a sensitivity. Consult your doctor regarding next steps; if the reaction is small, he might suggest re-introducing the food at a later date.

If your baby does develop diaper rash, feed her starchy foods that digest easily. Reliable options include pasta, bread, rice, whole grain cereal, and crackers. These will ward of diarrhea (which makes diaper rash worse) and bulk up your baby’s stool. (Paid link)

 

What Are Some Of The Other Causes Of Diaper Rash?

Now lets not think that diaper rash is only caused by food. Diaper rash can be caused by anything from your child’s own urine to a new food. Here are the most likely causes:

Although a child left in a wet or soiled diaper for too long is more likely to develop diaper rash, any child with sensitive skin can get a rash, even if you’re diligent about diaper changes.

  • Antibiotics. Children taking antibiotics (or children whose breastfeeding mothers are on antibiotics) sometimes get yeast infections because these drugs kill the healthy bacteria that keep yeast in check as well as the harmful bacteria that’s causing the illness. Antibiotics can also cause diarrhea, which can contribute to diaper rash.
  • New foods. We just read this one. Diaper rash is also common when your child first starts eating solid foods or tries a new food. Any new food changes the composition of the stool, but the acids in certain foods (such as strawberries and fruit juices) can be especially troublesome for some kids. A new food also might increase the frequency of your child’s bowel movements. If you’re breastfeeding, your child could even be having a reaction to something you ate (although breastfed children are usually less likely to get a diaper rash).
  • Bacterial or yeast infection. The diaper area is warm and moist – just the way bacteria and yeast like it. So it’s easy for a bacterial or yeast infection to flourish there and cause a rash, especially in the cracks and folds of your child’s skin. (Thrush is a type of oral yeast infection. Some children with thrush develop a yeast infection in their diaper area, too.)
  • Wetness. Even the most absorbent diaper leaves some moisture on your child’s skin. And when your child’s urine mixes with bacteria from his stool, it breaks down into ammonia, which can be very harsh on the skin. That’s why children with frequent bowel movements or diarrhea are more prone to diaper rash.
  • Chafing and chemical sensitivity. Your child’s diaper rash may be the result of his diaper rubbing against his skin, especially if he’s sensitive to chemicals, like the fragrances in a disposable diaper or the laundry detergent used to wash a cloth diaper. It could also be that a product you’re using during diaper changes irritates your child’s skin.
  • sensitivity to baby wipes
  • colon bacteria imbalance
  • cloth diaper sensitivities (to detergents or materials in cloth diapers). (Paid link).

When Should I Seek Medical Attention For Diaper Rash?

Normally with some monitoring, you should be able to clear your child’s rash in three or four days without a visit to the doctor. But do see the doctor if the rash looks as though it may be infected. A diaper rash can be caused by a yeast or bacterial infection or other conditions, you should get your doctor to take a look at the rash if it has persisted for longer than a week. Signs of infection include:

  • Blisters
  • Pus-filled pimples
  • Oozing yellow patches
  • Open sores

The doctor may prescribe a topical or oral antibiotic for your child.

For a diaper rash caused by a yeast infection, your child’s doctor may recommend an over-the-counter or prescription antifungal cream or ointment.

Also call the doctor if your child develops a fever or her rash doesn’t go away after several days of home treatment. The normal body temperature of a baby is anything between a Fahrenheit temperature of 97 degrees and 100.4 degrees. One way you can tell if your baby has a temperature is by touching or kissing his/her forehead. If the child feels hotter than usual, it’s probably because he/she has a fever.(Paid link).

Best Tips For Treating Your Little Star’s Diaper Rash

If diaper rash develops, take these steps to heal your child’s skin:

  • Dryness– Keep your child clean and dry by changing his diaper frequently. That may mean getting him up at night for a diaper change
  • Clean well– Rinse his diaper area well at each diaper change. Don’t use wipes that contain alcohol or fragrance. Some parents keep cotton balls and a squirt bottle or an insulated container of warm water at the changing table for easy, gentle cleanups.
  • Pat dry -Pat your child’s skin dry. Don’t rub!
  • Use barrier protection – Use an ointment that forms a barrier on the skin to protect your child’s irritated skin from stool and urine. You don’t have to use ointment at each diaper change: Apply a layer that’s thick enough to last through a couple diaper changes. This helps prevent further skin irritation from too much rubbing. There are several good barrier ointments available that include petroleum jelly or zinc oxide.
  • Loose fitting is key -Put your child’s diaper on loosely, or use a diaper that’s a little big on him to allow for better air circulation. If you buy disposables, try a different brand to see if that helps. There are varieties for sensitive skin, for example, and extra-absorbent options pull more moisture away from your child’s skin.
  • Air exposure is great– When the weather is warm and your child can play outside, leave his diaper (and ointment) off for as long as possible every day. Exposure to the air will speed healing.
  • Consider letting your child sleep with a bare bottom whenever he has a rash. A plastic sheet under the cloth one helps protect the mattress.

How Can I Keep Diaper Rash At Bay?

Here are some good preventive measures to keep diaper rash at bay:

  • Always remember- dry bottom is the best defense against diaper rash, so change your child’s diaper frequently or as soon as possible after it becomes wet or soiled.
  • Clean your child’s genital area thoroughly with each diaper change.
  • Pat her skin dry – never rub it. You can also use a hair dryer set on low to dry the diaper area after a diaper change.
  • If your child seems prone to diaper rash, spread a thin layer of protective ointment on her bottom after each diaper change.
  • Don’t use powders or cornstarch because the particles can be harmful to a child’s lungs if inhaled. Also, some experts think cornstarch can make a yeast diaper rash worse.
  • When your child starts eating solid foods, introduce one item at a time. Waiting a few days between each new food makes it easier to determine whether a sensitivity to a new food is causing diaper rash. If it is, eliminate that food for the time being.
  • Don’t secure the diaper so tightly that there’s no room for air to circulate. Dress her in loose clothing.
  • Use fragrance-free detergent to wash cloth diapers, and skip the fabric softener – both can irritate your child’s skin.
  • Wash diapers with hot water, and double rinse them. You also might add a half cup of vinegar to the first rinse to eliminate alkaline irritants.
  • Breastfeed your child for as long as you can because diaper rash occurs less often in breastfed babies, although it isn’t completely clear why.
  • When your child does need to take an antibiotic, ask the doctor about giving her a probiotic as well. Probiotics encourage the growth of healthy bacteria in the gut, which may reduce your child’s chances of getting a diaper rash.
  • If your child goes to daycare or preschool, make sure that her caregivers understand the importance of taking these precautions.

Bottom line

Diaper rash is quite common in babies wearing a diaper. It can have so many reasons for showing up in your baby. As a mom you should know what causes it and how to treat and prevent it. I have given you many tips and possible solutions to this condition. Never fail to see a healthcare provider if any condition is not improving. Never use power to treat a nappy rash because it can make matters worse. I wish you every success in your breastfeeding journey. Always ask God to give you His wisdom in every situation. He loves you and He cares. Thank you for visiting and do come again. Please comment and like this article if you really do. This website contains affiliate links, which means I earn a small commission  from products and services you purchase through my links at no extra cause to you.

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How to Know If Your Baby Is Getting Enough Breast Milk


We all need confidence in knowing that our little stars are getting enough breast milk

Hello Mamas! and Dads! We all want to know that baby is getting enough breast milk don’t we? Of course we do . If the little star is not getting enough, we know that many things can go wrong .e.g. a very hungry, crying baby, sleepless nights for both parents and baby, a malnourished baby with possible hospitalization. It is easier to approximate how much a formula fed baby is getting better than a breastfed baby.

The good thing with the breastfed baby is this baby can be fed every time he wants to feed. This is called demand feed. Mamas the good news is the more baby sucks your breast, the more milk you make.

It may take a little while before you feel confident your baby is getting what they need.

“Your baby will generally let you know, but wet and dirty nappies are a good indication, as well as hearing your baby swallow,” says Zoe Ralph, an infant feeding worker in Manchester and Fellow of the Institute of Health Visiting.

Exclusive breastfeeding (breast milk only) is recommended for around the first 6 months of your baby’s life. Introducing bottle feeds will reduce the amount of breast milk you produce. So if you want your baby to get more breast milk you must give more of your breast milk. The less breastfeeding, the less milk your body will make.

A Great Latch Is A Must To Ensure That Your Baby Is Getting Enough

Breastfeeding your baby is one of the best things you can do to build up his immune system
  • Your baby has a wide mouth and a large mouthful of breast.
  • Your baby’s chin is touching your breast, their lower lip is rolled down (you can’t always see this) and their nose isn’t squashed against your breast.
  • You don’t feel any pain in your breasts or nipples when your baby is feeding, although the first few sucks may feel strong.
  • You can see more of the dark skin around your nipple (areola) above your baby’s top lip than below their bottom lip.
  • Your baby starts feeds with a few rapid sucks followed by long, rhythmic sucks and swallows with occasional pauses.
  • You can hear and see your baby swallowing.
  • Your baby’s cheeks stay rounded, not hollow, during sucking.
  • They seem calm and relaxed during feeds.
  • Your baby comes off the breast on their own at the end of feeds.
  • Their mouth looks moist after feeds.
  • Your baby appears content and satisfied after most feeds.
  • Your breasts feel softer after feeds.
  • Your nipple looks more or less the same after feeds – not flattened, pinched or white.
  • You may feel sleepy, thirsty, and relaxed after feeds.
  • Your newborn is latching on and breastfeeding on a schedule—at least every 2 to 3 hours,2 or 8 to 12 times each day.
  • You’re changing wet (urine) diapers. After the fifth day of life, your baby should be having at least 6 to 8 wet diapers per day.2
  • You can hear your little one swallowing while she’s breastfeeding, and you can see breast milk in her mouth.
  • After breastfeeding your breasts feel softer and not as full as they did before the feeding. 
  • Your child appears satisfied and content after nursing, and he sleeps between breastfeeding’s.

Watch Out For Your Baby’s Weight Gain

n the first few days of life, it is normal for a breastfed baby to lose up to 10% of his or her body weight.1 But, after the first few days, a consistent weight gain is the best way to confirm that your baby is getting enough nutrition.

What Should I Expect From My Baby’s Stools?

The first poop that your baby will pass is called meconium. It’s thick, sticky, and black or dark green. Newborns have at least one or two of these meconium stools a day for the first two days.3 Then, as the meconium passes out of your baby’s body, his bowel movements will turn greenish-yellow before they become a looser, mustard yellow breastfeeding stool that may or may not have milk curds called “seeds” in it.

What Are Growth Spurts?

Watch those growth spurts

Does your baby seem very fussy or easily irritated at times? If your answer is yes, your baby could be experiencing what we call growth spurts. If your baby has been breastfeeding well, and then all of a sudden seems to want to nurse all the time and appears less satisfied, it may not be a problem with your supply of breast milk. It may be a growth spurt.(Paid link).

All babies are unique and have growth spurts at different times. Some of the common times that newborns and infants may have a growth spurt are at approximately ten days, three weeks, six weeks, three months, and six months of age.4

During a growth spurt, a child breastfeeds more often. This increase in breastfeeding usually only lasts a few days. It’s needed to stimulate your body to make more breast milk to meet your baby’s growing nutritional needs.

During the first two months, your baby should be breastfeeding every two to three hours, even throughout the night. After two months, some babies will begin to have longer stretches between breastfeeding’s during the night.

Again, every baby is different, and while some babies will sleep through the night by three months of age, others may not sleep through the night for many months. The same sleep pattern is also true of formula-fed infants, and it is not an indicator that your baby is not getting enough breast milk.5

Keep Your Well Child Exam Visits And Seek Medical Assistance

You will see your baby’s pediatrician or healthcare provider within a few days of leaving the hospital to check your child’s weight, and make sure she’s breastfeeding well and getting enough breast milk. It’s very important to continue to see your baby’s doctor at regular intervals.

Here are some signs that your newborn may not be getting enough breast milk.

  • Your newborn is not breastfeeding well.
  • Your child is very sleepy and does not wake up for most feedings.
  • Your little one has pink, red, or very dark yellow concentrated urine or less than six wet diapers a day after the fifth day of life.
  • Your baby is crying, sucking, and showing signs of hunger even with frequent breastfeeding.

Speak to your doctor or a lactation consultant as soon as possible to have the baby examined and your breastfeeding technique checked. The sooner you get help for any difficulties that may arise, the easier it will be to correct the problems and get breastfeeding back on the right track.

Bottom line

We know that every parent wants to know for sure that her baby is getting enough milk. It is important for you to ensure that your baby is properly latched on . You must also be aware that growth spurts are real and you should not give formula if you are exclusively breastfeeding. All you need to do is continue to breastfeed. Also you should observe your baby’s diapers, knowing what is normal and what is not. Being aware of warning signs of when to visit your pediatrician. I wish you every success. I hope you have learned something to help you to know when your baby is full. Thank you for stopping by today and do come again. Please like, comment or ask a question below. This website contains affiliate links, which means I earn a small commission from products and services you purchase through my links at no extra cause to you


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How To Calm A Crying Baby: Getting Positive Results


Finding what works for you and your baby are keys in calming your little star

There is nothing in the world like a calm comfortable baby. Sometimes my babies cried so much that when they finally fell asleep, I would find myself whispering and asking the rest of the family to please be as quiet as possible because baby was sleeping. Do you know what I mean mommy? Today we are going to learn how to calm your baby. Yes I am going to give you good tips that worked for me. It may take a few tries, but with patience and practice you’ll find out what works and what doesn’t for your baby. I hope they work also for you.

Did you know that your baby came from a noisy environment?

Babies in utero are rocked and swayed. They’re bombarded with the whooshing and gurgling sounds of their mother’s body and cradled by the walls of their “room.” No wonder, Karp says, they feel insecure and unhappy when lying alone in a quiet nursery, their arms and legs loose and flailing.(Paid link)

“Most babies doze much better when surrounded by some of the soothing sensations they enjoyed in the womb. These sensations work so well because they turn on a calming reflex – an off-switch for crying and on-switch for sleep that all babies are born with.”

  • Swaddle your baby in a large, thin blanket (ask your nurse or child’s doctor to show you how to do it correctly) to help her feel secure.
  • Hold your baby in your arms and place her body on her left side to help digestion or stomach for support. Gently rub her back. If your baby goes to sleep, remember to always lay her down in her crib on her back.
  • Turn on a calming sound. Sounds that remind babies of being inside the womb may be calming, such as a white noise device, the humming sound of a fan, or the recording of a heartbeat.
  • Walk your baby in a body carrier or rock her. Calming motions remind babies of movements they felt in the womb.
  • Avoid overfeeding your baby because this may also make her uncomfortable. Try to wait at least 2 to 2½ hours from the beginning of one feeding to the next.
  • If it is not yet time to feed your baby, offer the breast or pacifier if breastfeeding is established. Many babies are calmed by sucking.
  • If food sensitivity is the cause of discomfort, a change in diet may help.
    • For breastfed babies: Moms may try changing their own diet. See if your baby gets less fussy if you cut down on milk ­products or caffeine. If there is no ­difference after making the dietary changes, resume your usual diet. Avoiding spicy or gassy foods like onions or ­cabbage has worked for some moms, but this has not been ­scientifically proven.
    • For bottle-fed babies: Ask your child’s ­doctor if you should try a different for­mula. This has been shown to be helpful for some babies.
  • Keep a diary of when your baby is awake, asleep, eating, and crying. Write down how long it takes your baby to eat or if your baby cries the most after eating. Talk with your child’s doctor about these behaviors to see if her crying is related to sleeping or eating.
  • Limit each daytime nap to no longer than 3 hours a day. Keep your baby calm and quiet when you feed or change her during the night by avoiding bright lights and noises, such as the TV.(Paid link)

How do I swaddle a baby?

  • Lay a blanket on a flat surface like a diamond and fold down the top corner about 6 inches to form a straight edge.
  • Place your baby on his back so that the top of the fabric is at shoulder level.
  • Bring your baby’s left arm down. Pull the corner of the blanket near his left hand over his arm and chest, and tuck the leading edge under his back on his right side.
  • Bring your baby’s right arm down. Pull the corner of the blanket near his right hand over his arm and chest, and tuck the cloth under his left side.
  • Twist or fold the bottom end of the blanket and tuck it loosely behind your baby, making sure that both legs are bent up and out from his body, his hips can move, and his legs can spread apart naturally.

How To Keep Yourself Calm When Your Baby Is Fussy

Keeping yourself calm when your baby is fussy is one of the best things you can do

If you have tried to calm your crying baby but nothing seems to work, you may need to take a moment for yourself. Crying can be tough to handle, especially if you’re physically tired and mentally exhausted.

  • Take a deep breath and count to 10.
  • Place your baby in a safe place, such as crib or playpen without blankets and stuffed animals; leave the room; and let your baby cry alone for about 10 to 15 minutes.
  • While your baby is in a safe place, consider some actions that may help calm you down.
  • Listen to music for a few minutes.
  • Call a friend or family member for ­emotional support.
  • Do simple household chores, such as vacuuming or washing the dishes.
  • If you have not calmed after 10 to 15 minutes, check on your baby but do not pick up your baby until you feel you have calmed down.
  • Determine if your baby has a fever. If over 100 there is cause for concern.
  • Make sure your baby is not clad with too many clothes
  • Check your baby’s diaper. Babies hate soiled diapers.
  • When you have calmed down, go back and pick up your baby. If your baby is still crying, retry soothing measures.
  • Call your child’s doctor. There may be a medical reason why your baby is crying.
  • Try to be patient. Keeping your baby safe is the most important thing you can do. It is normal to feel upset, frustrated, or even angry, but it is important to keep your behavior under control. Remember, it is never safe to shake, throw, hit, slam, or jerk any child—and it never solves the problem!

Bottom line

All babies at some point in their growth will become fussy and irritable. Knowing how to handle these times is important to prevent you from getting burnout. Calming your baby can happen in many ways. I hope you never get burn out and find a solution to calming your baby. Remember God loves you and He cares. Ask Him to give you the wisdom you need to taking care of your little star. If you have a topic you would like for me to talk about, let me know below. This website contains affiliate links, which means I earn a small commission from products and services you purchase through my links at no extra cause to you.

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Breastfeeding And Your Period: Understanding What Happens


Many new moms wonder when they will see their period. I was one of them.

Your period is connected to fertility, pregnancy, and even breastfeeding. Missing a period is one of the first signs of pregnancy, and while you’re pregnant, the hormones in your body keep your period away.

Then, if you decide to breastfeed, your period may stay away for weeks, months, or longer. So, when should you expect your period to return and how will menstruation affect breastfeeding and your baby?

You may have many questions about what to expect once your baby is born. Here’s what you need to know about breastfeeding and your period.

There are so many questions surrounding breastfeeding and periods, with so much info out there it is hard to know when will your period come back while breastfeeding. Every woman’s body is different and every breastfeeding journey is unique.

Lets begin with after the birth of the baby. 

After birth , certain conditions make it possible for you to see your period

The bleeding that you’ll have right after your baby is born may seem like a period, but that’s not actually what it is. It’s called lochia, and it’s a mixture of blood, mucus, and tissue from the lining of your uterus. Lochia starts out as bright red bleeding. It can be very heavy, and it may contain blood clots.

When do I see my period after my baby is born?

Breastfeeding could hold off your period longer. However, even if you do breastfeed, you could get your period back right away. You are more likely to get your period back sooner if:https://277810b69f2d58b215ad5b2cdea0fc8d.safeframe.googlesyndication.com/safeframe/1-0-37/html/container.html

Your Period and Breastfeeding: Here’s what happens

Breastfeeding after seeing your period is ok

When your period does return, it doesn’t mean you have to wean your baby. Breastfeeding while you have your period is perfectly safe. It’s not harmful to you or your child at all. There is no set time as to when your period will come back after delivery. Certain conditions will give certain results. Each woman is different.

Your breast milk is still healthy and nutritious for your baby. However, hormone changes in the days leading up to your period can affect your breast milk and your baby’s breastfeeding pattern for a few days.

You may not notice any difference in breastfeeding when your period returns. And, even if there are some changes, your baby may not mind and continue to breastfeed as usual.

It’s also possible that the return of your period can cause nipple tenderness, a dip in your breast milk supply, and for the taste of your breast milk to change.

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Research shows that the composition of breast milk changes around ovulation (mid-cycle).3 The levels of sodium and chloride in the milk go up while lactose (milk sugar) and potassium go down. So, the breast milk becomes saltier and less sweet during this time. 

Also around the time of ovulation and just before the start of your period, estrogen and progesterone levels change which can affect your breasts and your breast milk. When estrogen and progesterone levels go up, it can make your breasts feel full and tender.

Higher estrogen levels can also interfere with milk production. Studies also show that calcium levels in the blood go down after ovulation.4 The lower level of calcium may also contribute to sore nipples and a drop in the milk supply.

Here Is The Reason Why You Have No Period While Breastfeeding 

Breastfeeding can put off the return of your menstrual cycle for many months, a year, or even longer. The reason why many women do not get a period is that your body does not release hormones in your body that prepare you for a new pregnancy. It depends on your body and how often and how long you decide to breastfeed. Your period may stay away longer if you:

  • Breastfeed exclusively
  • Nurse both day and night
  • Keep your baby close to you by baby-wearing and co-sleeping
  • Avoid giving your child a bottle or a pacifier
  • Refrain from supplementing with formula or water
  • Hold off on starting solid foods until your little one is four to six months old

Once you are breastfeeding less often such as when your baby is sleeping through the night or you begin weaning, your period is more likely to start up again. Although, some women don’t get their period for a few months after breastfeeding has completely ended. When it finally shows up, breastfeeding more often will not get it to stop again.

Remember pumping or expressing breast milk by hand does not have the same effect on your body as breastfeeding does. If you choose to pump and bottle feed your baby, it will not hold off your period.( Paid link)

Period Return Equals- Fertility Is Here Again

When your period returns, you should consider yourself fertile.6 If you’re not ready to have another baby right away, you may want to look into birth control.

Your doctor will most likely talk to you about your birth control options during your first postpartum doctor visit at approximately four to six weeks after your baby is born. If not, bring it up and be sure to tell her that you’re breastfeeding since some types of birth control can interfere with your supply of breast milk.

Getting Pregnant Before Your Period Returns

Always remember that you can get pregnant before seeing your period

You can release an egg from your ovary (ovulate) before your period returns. Therefore, there is a chance that you can become pregnant while you’re breastfeeding even before your period comes back.

So, if you’re involved in an intimate relationship, and you’re not using birth control, it is possible to find yourself expecting again without ever getting your first postpartum period.

Breast Tenderness During Period

Take care of breastfeeding issues as soon as possible
Make sure to consult your lactation specialist for any issues with breastfeeding issues

It’s not uncommon to experience sore nipples when you get your period. So, for a few days before your period starts, it may be a little uncomfortable to breastfeed. Here are some tips to help you deal with nipple tenderness. (Paid link)

  • Try not to let the pain prevent you from breastfeeding, if possible.
  • Practice skin to skin and continue to put the baby to the breast so you can maintain your milk supply and prevent other breastfeeding problems such as breast engorgementnipple blebsplugged milk ducts, and mastitis.
  • Avoid using a numbing cream to try to relieve the pain. These products can numb your baby’s mouth and interfere with the let-down of your breast milk
  • Ask your doctor if it’s safe for you to use an over-the-counter pain reliever for the few days it hurts.
  • Pump your breast milk, if it’s too painful and you just cannot breastfeed. Pumping will help you keep up your milk supply while you’re waiting for the tenderness to pass. It also allows you to continue to give your baby your breast milk.

How to increase Your Milk Supply

The decrease in your milk supply related to your period is usually temporary. You may notice the dip during the few days before your period arrives. Then, once you get your period, your supply should begin to increase again as the hormones balance out. To combat a low breast milk supply during your period you can:5

  • Try to build up your breast milk supply naturally.
  • Use an herbal breastfeeding tea or another galactagogue to help boost your milk production.
  • Eat a well-balanced diet with iron-rich foods (red meat, leafy greens) and milk-making superfoods (oatmeal, almonds, fennel).
  • Drink plenty of fluids.
  • Try a combination of calcium and magnesium supplements such as 1000mg of calcium taken with 500mg of magnesium before and during your period.
  • Talk to your doctor, a lactation consultant, or a local breastfeeding group for more information and helpful advice.
  • Observe your baby’s soiled nappies.

If your milk supply drops too low, it could be dangerous for your baby. So, you should also:

Bottom line

Breastfeeding can affect your period, and your period can affect breastfeeding, your breast milk, and your baby. While many women do not notice any changes when their period returns, some women experience inconvenient or concerning issues.

It is so good to know that the most common breastfeeding problems that result from the return of your period are temporary. Of course, you may decide that the sore nipples and extra work it takes to keep up your milk supply are just too much. While it’s still safe and beneficial to breastfeed when you have your period, some moms choose to wean once their period returns.

It may even be easier if the baby is breastfeeding less due a lower breast milk supply and change in the flavor of the milk. While it’s true that the longer you can breastfeed, the better it is for you and your child, it’s really up to you and what works best for your family. Thank you for stopping by today. I hope you learned something. Do visit again and know that God loves you. Ask Him to help you as you go through your challenges through out life. I wish you every success in your breastfeeding journey. Leave a comment below, I would love to hear from you. .Just so you know, Breast Fed Is Best Academy may earn commissions from shopping links.

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Foods To Eat And Avoid While Breastfeeding


Breast milk contains everything a baby needs for the first 6 months of life. Additionally, the fat and calorie content of breast milk changes both during a feeding and over time to accommodate your baby’s needs

Did you know that breast milk is chock-full of nourishing nutrients and protective compounds that are essential for your baby’s development. This is why breast milk is known as the “gold standard” for infant nutrition and is often referred to as liquid gold.”

Not surprisingly, it takes a lot of energy to produce this liquid gold and your needs for many nutrients increase to meet these demands.

It’s so, so important to choose nutrient-dense, nourishing foods to support your breast milk production. Plus, eating healthy foods postpartum can help you feel better both mentally and physically — and who doesn’t want that?

This article explains everything you need to know about eating a healthy diet while breastfeeding. Breastfeeding may help reduceTrusted Source your risk of developing certain medical conditions later in life, including heart disease and diabetes. It may also relieve stress and help you feel more connected to your new baby.

Learn the good benefits of breastmilk

Mama you may be wondering why it’s so important that you follow a heathy, nutrient-dense diet while breastfeeding.

In addition to promoting your overall health, a healthy diet is essential for ensuring that your baby is getting all the nutrients they need to develop.

With the exception of vitamin D, breast milk contains everything your baby needs for proper development during the first 6 months.

Vitamin D is key. It’s essential for healthy bones, for both you and your baby, and we get most of it from sun exposure. If you live somewhere that doesn’t have a lot of sunshine, especially during winter, your body may struggle to make enough vitamin D so supplements are recommended2 – your healthcare professional can advise you.

What foods should You avoid while breastfeeding?

Mamas there is good news, apart from limiting how much oily fish you eat, there aren’t any specific foods to avoid when breastfeeding your baby. Caffeine and alcohol are also fine, within sensible limits .

And unless you are allergic to peanuts yourself, there is no reason to avoid peanut-based foods while breastfeeding. In fact, the latest research suggests that if you eat peanuts while breastfeeding and introduce them to your infant’s diet within his first year, he is less likely to develop a sensitivity to them.4

Group 1 nutrients

Here are the group 1 nutrients and how to find them in some common food sources:

  • Vitamin B1 (Thiamin): fish, pork, seeds, nuts, beans
  • Vitamin B2 (Riboflavin): cheese, almonds, nuts, red meat, oily fish, eggs
  • Vitamin B6: chickpeas, nuts, fish, poultry, potatoes, bananas, dried fruit
  • Vitamin B12: shellfish, liver, yogurt, oily fish, nutritional yeast, eggs, crab, shrimp
  • Choline: eggs, beef liver, chicken liver, fish, peanuts
  • Vitamin A: sweet potatoes, carrots, dark leafy greens, organ meats, eggs
  • Vitamin D: cod liver oil, oily fish, some mushrooms, fortified foods
  • Selenium: Brazil nuts, seafood, turkey, whole wheat, seeds
  • Iodine: dried seaweed, cod, milk, iodized salt

Group 2 nutrients

Here are the group 2 nutrients and some common food sources:

  • Folate: beans, lentils, leafy greens, asparagus, avocados
  • Calcium: You should also ensure you’re getting enough calcium, as this is depleted when breastfeeding.3 Aim for four servings a day from dairy foods, such as milk, yoghurt and cheese, or non-dairy sources, including nuts, tofu, sesame seeds and leafy green vegetables. A serving could be half a cup of green veggies or a small 50 g (1.5 oz) piece of cheese. milk, yogurt, cheese, leafy greens, legumes
  • Iron: red meat, pork, poultry, seafood, beans, green vegetables, dried fruit
  • Copper: shellfish, whole grains, nuts, beans, organ meats, potatoes
  • Zinc: oysters, red meat, poultry, beans, nuts, dairy

But if your overall diet does not provide sufficient nutrients, it can affect both the quality of your breast milk and your own health. I really want you to have a good quality breast milk. This is what is going to give your baby the best in his developing stages.

ResearchTrusted Source shows that breast milk is made up of 87 percent water, 3.8 percent fat, 1.0 percent protein, and 7 percent carbohydrate and provides 60 to 75 kcal/100ml.

Unlike baby formula, the calorie content and composition of breast milk varies. Breast milk changes during each feeding and throughout your lactation period, in order to meet the needs of your baby.

At the beginning of a feeding, the milk is more watery and usually quenches the baby’s thirst. The milk that comes later (hindmilk) is thicker, higher in fat and more nutritious.

In fact according to an older 2005 studyTrusted Source, this milk may contain 2 to 3 times as much fat as milk from the beginning of a feeding, and 7 to 11 more calories per ounce. Therefore, to get to the most nutritious milk, it’s important that your baby empties one breast before switching to the other.

Supplements can add to your quality of nutrition

Taking certain supplements can help replenish your stores of certain vitamins and minerals.

There are a number of reasons why new moms may be low in certain nutrients, including not eating the right foods and the increased energy demands of breast milk production, along with looking after your baby.

Taking supplements can help boost your intake of important nutrients. But it’s important to be weary when choosing supplements, since many contain herbs and other additives that aren’t safe for breastfeeding moms.

A multivitamin can be a great choice for increasing your intake of important vitamins and minerals.

It’s common for women to be deficient in vitamins and minerals after delivery and researchTrusted Source shows that deficiencies don’t discriminate, affecting moms in both high- and low-income settings.

Vitamin B-12

Vitamin B-12 is a super important water-soluble vitamin that is essential for your baby’s health, as well as your own health, during breastfeeding.

Plus, many women — especially those following mostly plant-based dietsTrusted Source, those who’ve had gastric bypass surgeryTrusted Source, and women who are on certain medications (such as acid reflux drugs) — are already at an increased risk of having low B-12 levels.

If you fit into one of these categories, or if you feel that you don’t eat enough B-12 rich foods like fish, meat, poultry, eggs, and fortified foods, then taking a B-complex or B-12 supplement is a good idea.

Keep in mind that a most high-quality multivitamin and prenatal vitamins contain enough B-12 to cover your needs.

Omega-3 (DHA)

Omega-3 fats are all the rage nowadays, and for good reason. These fats, naturally found in fatty fish and algae, play essential roles in both maternal and fetal health.

For example, the omega-3 fat DHA is critical for the development of your baby’s nervous system, skin, and eyes. Plus, concentration of this important fat in breast milk largely depends on your intake levels.

What’s more, researchTrusted Source shows that babies who are fed breast milk with high levels of DHA have better vision and neurodevelopment outcomes.

Because breast milk concentrations of omega-3s reflect your intake of these important fats, it’s essential that you get enough. We recommend that nursing mothers take in 250 to 375 mg daily of DHA plus EPA, another important omega-3 fat.

Although eating 8 to 12 ounces of fish, especially fatty fish like salmon and sardines, can help you reach the recommended intake levelsTrusted Source, taking a fish oil or krill oil supplement is a convenient way to cover your daily needs.

Vitamin D

Vitamin D is only found in a few foods, like fatty fish, fish liver oils, and fortified products. Your body can also produce it from sunlight exposure, though it depends on many factors, like skin color and where you live.

ResearchTrusted Source shows that it plays many important roles in your body and is essential for immune function and bone health.

Vitamin D is usually only present in low amounts in breast milk, especially when sun exposure is limited.

Therefore, supplementing with 400 IU of vitamin D per day is recommended for breast-fed babies and babies consuming less than 1 liter of formula per day, starting during the first few days of life and continuing until they are 12 months of age, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics.

According to researchTrusted Source, supplementing with 6,400 IU daily can help supply your baby with adequate amounts of vitamin D through breast milk alone. Interestingly, this amount is much higher than the current recommended vitamin D intake of 600 IU for breastfeeding moms.

Vitamin D deficiency is extremely common amongst breastfeeding women. And deficiency can lead to negative health outcomes, including an increased riskTrusted Source of postpartum depression. That’s why supplementing with this vitamin is recommended.

Ask your healthcare provider for specific dosing recommendations based on your current vitamin D levels.

Drink plenty of water

While breastfeeding, you release oxytocin, which stimulates thirst. This natural biological process ensures that you drink enough water to meet your increased fluid needs.

In addition to being hungrier than usual while breastfeeding, you may feel thirstier as well.

When your baby latches onto your breast, your oxytocin levels increase. This causes your milk to start flowing. This also stimulates thirst and helps ensure that you stay properly hydrated while feeding your baby.

It’s important to note that your hydration needs will vary depending on factors like activity levels and dietary intake. There’s no one-size-fits-all rule when it comes to how much fluid you need during breastfeeding.

As a rule of thumb, you should always drink when you are thirsty and until you have quenched your thirst.

But if you feel very tired, faint, or as if your milk production is decreasing, you may need to drink more water. The best way to tell if you are drinking enough water is the color and smell of your urine.

If it is dark yellow and has a strong smell, that’s a sign that you’re dehydrated and need to<a href=”http://- <a href=”https://www.tkqlhce.com/click-100174660-14068999″&gt; <img src=”https://www.lduhtrp.net/image-100174660-14068999&#8243; width=”468″ height=”60″ alt=”” border=”0″/> drink more water.

Foods and drinks to avoid while breastfeeding

Although you may have heard otherwise, it’s safe to eat just about any food while breastfeeding, unless you have an allergy to a specific food.

And, although some flavors from food, spices or beverages may change the taste of your breast milk, researchTrusted Source shows it’s unlikely that this will impact your baby’s feeding time or make them fussy.

Another common misconception is that “gassy” foods like cauliflower and cabbage will cause gassiness in your baby, too. Although these foods may make you gassy, the gas-promoting compounds do not transfer to breast milk, per this 2017 researchTrusted Source.

In summary, most foods and drinks are safe during breastfeeding, but there are a few that should be limited or avoided. If you think something may be impacting your baby negatively, ask your healthcare provider for advice.

Caffeine

About 1 percentTrusted Source of the caffeine you consume is transferred to breast milk, and research says it takes babies much longer to metabolize caffeine. Drinking caffeinated beverages like coffee have not been shown to cause harm, but they may affect the baby’s sleep.

Therefore, it’s recommended that breastfeeding women limit their coffee intake to about 2 to 3 cups per day. It’s a bummer, we know, but at least some coffee is allowed, right?(Paid link)

Alcohol

The AAP suggests no more than 0.5 grams of alcohol per kilogram of body weight, which for a 60-kilogram (132-pound) mother, equals 2 ounces of liquor, 8 ounces of wine, or 2 beers.

Many breastfeeding mums choose to stop drinking alcohol. However, occasional light drinking while breastfeeding has not been shown to have any adverse effects on babies.8 Alcohol is best avoided until your baby is over three months old, though, and then enjoyed as an occasional treat, such as a small (125 ml/4.2 fl oz) glass of wine.

If you do have an alcoholic drink, make sure you allow at least a couple of hours (2) for the alcohol to go through your system before your next breastfeed.9 Alternatively, you could have a small drink while you’re actually breastfeeding your baby, as by the time the alcohol is in your system, he will have finished feeding. Or for total peace of mind, if you’re planning to have an alcoholic drink you could express and store milk beforehand and give that to your baby for his next feed.

Bear in mind that alcohol can temporarily reduce your milk yield,8 so if you do have a drink your baby may seem hungrier and want to feed more.

Although it’s perfectly find to enjoy an alcoholic beverage as a breastfeeding mom, it’s best to wait at least 2 hours after drinking to breastfeed your baby.

Cow’s milk

Although uncommon. Some babies may be allergic to cow’s milk. And if your baby has a cow’s milk allergy, it’s important that you exclude all dairy products from your diet.

Up to 1 percentTrusted Source of breastfed infants are allergic to cow’s milk protein from their mother’s diet, and may develop rashes, eczema, diarrhea, bloody stools, vomiting or baby colic.

Your healthcare provider can give you advice on how long to exclude dairy from your diet for, and when it’s safe to reintroduce dairy.

Breastfeeding and weight loss: Lets learn the facts

You might be tempted to lose weight quickly after delivery, but weight loss takes time and it’s important to be kind to your body during this transition. After having my babies, I hated to look at myself in the mirror. I wanted to loose my weight right away.As time went by I realize that the weight did not come one time therefore loosing it would not be that simple.

With the many hormonal changes that take place during breastfeeding and the calorie demands of making breast milk, you may have a bigger appetite during breastfeeding.

Restricting calories too much, especially during the first few months of breastfeeding, may decrease your milk supply and much-needed energy<a href=”http://- <a href=”https://www.tkqlhce.com/click-100174660-14068999″&gt; <img src=”https://www.lduhtrp.net/image-100174660-14068999&#8243; width=”468″ height=”60″ alt=”” border=”0″/> levels.(Paid link)

Fortunately, breastfeeding alone has been shownTrusted Source to promote weight loss, especially when continued for 6 months or longer. (That said, losing weight during breastfeeding doesn’t happen for everyone!)

Losing approximately 1.1 pounds (0.5 kilograms) per weekTrusted Source through a combination of a healthy diet and exercise should not affect your milk supply or milk composition, assuming that you are not undernourished to begin with.

All breastfeeding women, no matter their weight, should consume adequate calories. But if you’re underweight, it’s likely that you’ll be more sensitive to calorie restriction.

For this reason, it’s essential that women with less body weight consume more calories to avoid a reduction in milk supply.

All in all, remember that losing weight after delivery is a marathon, not a sprint. It took months to put on the weight for a healthy pregnancy for both you and your baby, and it may take you months to lose it — and that’s okay.

The most important thing to remember when trying to lose pregnancy weight is that restrictive diets are not good for overall health and don’t work for long-term weight loss.

Following a nutritious diet, adding exercise into your daily routine, and getting enough sleep are the best ways to promote healthy weight loss.

Bottom line

Breastfeeding is no doubt hard work! Your body requires more calories and nutrients to keep you and your baby nourished and healthy.

If you’re not eating enough calories or nutrient-rich foods, this can negatively affect the quality of your breast milk. It can also be detrimental for your own health.

It’s more important than ever to eat a variety of healthy, nutritious foods and limit processed foods. Avoid excess caffeine and alcohol consumption, and stick to the recommended intakes to keep your baby healthy. Thanks for stopping by today and I hope you are getting the results you need for your breastfeeding journey. I wish you every success. If you are a male I encourage you to support the woman in your life who is breastfeeding.

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How To Keep Your Sleepy Baby Awake While Breastfeeding: Best Tips For Great Results


 Breastfeeding provides more than nutrition to your little one. It’s bonding time, but breastfeeding difficulties can lead to worry and frustration

Breastfeeding can set the stage for falling asleep while breastfeeding. This can pose a problem with breastfeeding because they might not wake enough to take full feedings. Keeping them awake while breastfeeding is key to getting them to eat enough. .

The most common reasons a baby might fall asleep on the breast are they’re tired, overstimulated, or their tummy is nice and full.

Remember, feeding sessions should last about 20 minutes.

If they drift off around or beyond that time limit, you shouldn’t be concerned unless they’re showing signs of illness, weight loss, or dehydration.

Every mother wants to know that after a feed their little star is satisfied. Did you know that there is a reason for this :

According to a study, there’s a hormone released while breastfeeding called cholecystokinin (or CCK) that naturally makes them feel full and drowsy. And the younger the infant is, the higher the concentrations of CCK is released in their body.

The times are rough estimates because your milk flow sets your baby’s pace.

Slower flow can cause your baby to sleep, and you might need to manually manipulate your breast to increase it.

A faster flow can leave your baby satiated in less time, which then can lull them to sleep. Keep breast flow going with encouraging baby to always breastfeed at first while at the breast. Try breastfeeding both breasts first for at least 10 minutes and if baby still does not want it, give baby breastmilk or formula if not taking breast. Pump every 2-3 hours or 8times per day to keep stimulating breasts to make more milk.

Tips and tricks for keeping baby awake while breastfeeding

  • Wet a washcloth with lukewarm water and rub it on their face or along their hairline.
  • Do breast massages while feeding to encourage them to feed longer.
  • Run your fingers gently along their cheek or foot.
  • Switch breasts as soon as you notice baby stops actively suckling and begins to trail off.
  • Breastfeed in the “football” hold.
  • Walk your fingers up baby’s spine.
  • Tickle their lower lip to encourage them to latch.
  • Feed your baby as soon as they wake.
  • Unwrap the baby from their blanket.
  • Express some milk into their mouth.
  • Lay them down on a flat, firm surface.  
  • Bathe them.
  • Stroke your baby’s cheek if they’re latched but not actively nursing.
  • Move their arms and legs in a bicycling motion.
  • Talk to your baby!

After trying a few tips, express milk for your baby if they’re still not responding. You can use hand expression or your pump.  

Also, be sure to closely monitor their pee and poop output and weight gain to make sure they’re consistently getting enough to eat.

Mamas, observe your baby’s soiled nappies closely?

Mamas, it is important for you to observe your baby’s soiled diapers to determine if your little star is getting enough.

Keep track of your baby’s diapers. Mark how many pee and poop diapers you change each day.

Don’t worry too much about the poop consistency unless the stools are hard, dry, or difficult to pass.

Bowel frequency can vary too and depends on your baby’s age. Breastfed babies can produce one to six bowel movements a day.

If your baby produces more than 12 bowel movements, call your pediatrician.

Another concern is diarrhea, which could be a sign of an intolerance or allergy. Food allergies can cause excessive sleepiness in babies, children, and adults.

This makes it a cause and symptom to explain why your baby keeps drifting off.

Finding the culprit isn’t easy, but once you do, you’ll solve how to keep baby awake during breastfeeding with one small change.

Urination will occur more frequently, and you should expect at least six wet diapers a day. Any less could be a cause for concern.

It should not have a strong or offensive odor, and the color should be on the pale side. Dark urine can be a sign of dehydration.

Concerned that your little star is not gaining weight

  • After the first few weeks, your baby should gain about 6 ounces per week.
  • Don’t be alarmed if your baby is a little over or under as this is a rough estimate for exclusively breastfed babies.
  • Some babies grow slower or faster too, and your genetics do play a role.
  • Most weighing occurs at the doctor’s office. Your pediatrician will most likely show you your baby’s growth on a curving percentile chart.
  • They look at the curve and individual history more than the actual numbers since each child is different.
  • As long as you’re making your well visit checkups, your doctor should catch weight-related issues.
  • However, don’t hesitate to make an appointment if you notice your child isn’t nursing normally, having fewer stools and/or urine diapers, or visibly losing weight.

Are you concerned about your milk drying up?

I know this can be a concern for both you and your baby. Maybe your infant is sleeping more, and it’s temporary.

A dwindling milk supply that isn’t addressed quickly might force you to supplement formula.

Pumping is another alternative to supplementing. After your baby falls asleep, you pump what remains and store it properly.

This enables your body to continue producing an adequate supply and provides you with breast milk on demand should your baby need it.

More Best tips to keep baby awake while feeding

The change might be enough to stop them from sleeping. Try these tips to wake your baby if feeding sessions end before 20 minutes.

Change their Diaper:

Like above, when they show signs of sleepiness, or irritability get up and check their diaper.

Play Stimulating Music: This might not work for all babies.

Choose higher tempo music!

play at a comfortable but loud enough to keep your baby awake.

Change Feeding Position:

Some feeding techniques are more sleep-inducing than others are.

Try a laid-back approach.

Lay back on a couch, recliner, or in bed on your back. Place your baby so their tummy is on yours.

Break the Suction:

This can encourage a baby to suckle again. Simply use your finger to gently pry their mouth free.

Wipe Baby Down:

Using a dampened, warm washcloth, wipe down your baby from head to toe.

The cool air and stimulation might be enough to wake up your baby.

Give baby a bath can also help.

Swap Sides:

If you notice your baby drifting off, take the time to change them to your other breast.

Bottom line

Keeping your baby awake while breastfeeding can be a concern for you Mamas. I know. If none of the tips help you consider seeing your pediatrician to answer your concerns. Thank you for stopping by today and do visit again. Feel free to comment below. If you are a new mom or mom to be , accept my gift to you by checking out this link for :

YOUR ULTIMATE BREASTFEEDING GUIDE

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How To Wake Your Sleeping Baby For Breastfeeding: Excellent Tips For Your Success


Many mothers have experienced sleepy babies while breastfeeding. I encourage you to observe your baby for signs of illnesses if it prolonged

I have seen it all! Yes I have seen so many new parents want to feed their breastfeeding babies, are afraid to wake them up to feed. Even the new dads are afraid to wake up their newborns. Its time for your baby to feed but you do not know how to wake baby up. Time for feeding is very important for breastfeeding or formula fed babies. Or you may be breastfeeding your baby and baby keeps falling asleep. I will help you out today by helping you to understand why this happens and some great tips on how you can get great results. Paid link)

WHY ARE NEWBORNS SO DROWSY DURING THE FIRST WEEK?

There are some reasons why babies are sleepy at the breast

When they’re very young, newborns and infants can be sleepy for many reasons, and it’s normal for your child to be drowsy for some of their feedings. Just after birth, your baby may be tired or still affected by the medications that you were given during labor and delivery. Plus, some newborns just like to sleep a lot. Medications for pain and sedation often cause this in newborns. Additionally, for some babies. the birth experience can also be a bit too much.

As the weeks go on, you will be able to let your child sleep for longer periods of time between feedings. At approximately two weeks of age, your baby may have one long stretch of sleep each day of up to five hours (at night, if you are lucky), where you don’t have to wake them for feeding.(Paid link).

After two months, your baby will most likely be able to sleep as much as they want between feedings. Just be sure they are breastfeeding about eight to 10 times a day and gaining weight well.

I had four babies and I never thought that a sleeping baby could be so hard at times to wake. While working in the hospital, I observed some mothers trying to breastfeed their sleeping babies. You know it never works. Let me give you some easy tips to help you along. Mamas and Dadas, you do not have to be afraid to touch your baby.

Tips to wake your little star for breastfeeding

There are many ways you can try to wake your baby up
  • Dim the lights: A baby’s eyes are sensitive to bright light. Little ones may be more likely to open their eyes and wake up in a darker room.
  • Practice skin to skin. Let baby immerse in the oxytocin limelight; looking at you, smelling your milk , and listening to your heartbeat. Practice as often as possible.
  • Put your baby to your breast: The natural rooting reflex that your baby is born with may get them eating even if they are sleepy. You can also try to express a few drops of your breast milk onto your baby’s mouth. The smell and taste of your breast milk may help to get your baby sucking.
  • Stroke your baby’s cheek: If you can get your child latched on but they still aren’t eating, stroke their cheek to help get them nursing.
  • Change breastfeeding positions: Moving your child to a different breastfeeding position might help to wake them up. Try the side-lying position, football hold, or laid-back nursing position.
  • Avoid using a pacifier: Using a pacifier can keep your child sleeping longer, and it can prevent you from realizing that your baby is hungry. While it’s OK for breastfed babies to use a pacifier, wait until the child is approximately 4 to 6 weeks old and breastfeeding is going well before introducing it.
  • Unwrap your baby: Remove your child’s blankets and even undress them so that they aren’t so warm and comfortable. However, keep in mind that babies lose body heat very quickly. So do not keep your child undressed in a cold room.
  • Change your baby’s diaper: The movement and feeling of a diaper change are often enough to get a baby up and ready to eat. (Paid link)
  • Grab a washcloth: Gently wipe your child’s face with a wet washcloth.
  • Try a bath: The feel of the water and the change in temperature might do the trick.
  • Burp your baby: Patting and rubbing your baby’s back can help to wake them up. Burping also removes any air trapped in your child’s stomach that may be making them feel full or uncomfortable (and not interested in eating).
  • Touch your baby: Ease your child out of their sleepy state by tickling their feet or gently rubbing their arms, legs, and back.
  • Talk to your child: Just hearing your voice might be enough to wake your baby.

When should I become concerned?

Anytime I had issues with my kids I also talked to God about it

Infant jaundice, illness, infections, or other issues can cause sleepiness in infants beyond what is normal. If you believe your baby is excessively sleepy, or you’re having trouble waking your baby for most feedings, notify your child’s pediatrician right away.

Bottom Line

The fact of the matter is some babies are hard to wake . We see that there are many reasons for this. Many new Mamas experience their babies being very hard to wake up when it is time to breastfeed. I have provided you with many tips to help you out. I hope something works for you and your little star. The first 15 minutes while feeding every mom should aim as much as possible to keep baby awake. This can be done by simply motivating baby , rubbing her hair, talking to her, play with her until her eyes open and reattach to the breast. Thanks for stopping by today and do visit again. If you had issues with waking your baby up please let me know what works for you.

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Watch this video on tips on how to wake your baby for feeds @(19) Baby Sleeping While Breastfeeding-How to Keep Him Awake – YouTube

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