BREASTFEEDING AND OBESITY: Best Evidenced Data


Breastfeeding is the number one cure in preventing childhood obesity

Hello Mamas. Here is another exciting topic on breastfeeding and obesity. For centuries obesity has been a common problem in the world.

Making a decision to breastfeed your baby benefits both you and your baby. There are so many health benefits to your child from breastfeeding, including prevention of infections such as ear infections, diarrhea, and other bacterial and viral infections. Research also suggests that breastfeeding may help protect against diabetes and some cancers. Breastfeeding provides warmth and closeness between you and your baby. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends breastfeeding your child for the first year of life.

I have wonderful news today, breastfeeding also provides many other benefits for mothers. Mothers who breastfeed tend to lose pregnancy weight more quickly. I can testify to this. When I delivered my babies, I looked forward to breastfeeding because I knew it would help me to loose the weight from childbirth fast. Hormones released during breastfeeding help to return the uterus to its normal size and can prevent postpartum bleeding. Research shows that women who have breastfed have lower chances of getting ovarian cancer and breast cancer later in life. Many mothers also feel joy and fulfillment from the connection they experience with their child while nursing.

One important health benefit of breastfeeding is prevention of obesity. Obesity is one of the most serious health problems facing both children and adults today. Childhood obesity often leads to adult obesity, which causes many health problems including heart disease, diabetes, and even early death. Researchers are learning more about how breastfeeding can help prevent obesity. Breast milk provides your baby with food that is easy to digest and very nutritious, and your child helps decide how much to eat and when to eat it. Both the breast milk itself and the way your baby feeds help him or her to develop healthy eating patterns. Breastfed babies seem to be better able to regulate their food intake and thus are at lower risk for obesity.

What Does the Recent Data Research Say?

Breastfeeding is the number one cure in preventing childhood obesity

According to the JAMA Peadiactrics Network, the question is asked:

What is the impact of a nutrition-focused home-visiting intervention on early childhood obesity and associated risk factors?

Findings  In this randomized clinical trial of 134 Navajo mothers and their infants enrolled 3 to 12 months post partum, mothers who received the Family Spirit Nurture infant nutrition and responsive feeding home-visiting intervention vs those who did not reported feeding children substantially fewer sugar-sweetened beverages and having better responsive feeding practices. In turn, their infants had lower body mass index z scores.

Meaning  Results of this trial suggest that a home-visiting intervention created in partnership with and for Native American individuals is an effective strategy for promoting healthy infant feeding and growth in the first year of life.

Another recent study :

Breastfeeding reduces the rate of obesity

Here is another   new study published in the journal Pediatrics . It showed that what really helped prevent obesity was getting breast milk directly from the breast.

That’s not to say that drinking expressed breast milk from a bottle isn’t healthy. After all, it’s the food that was explicitly designed for infants — and in the study, babies that got breast milk from a bottle did have lower rates of obesity at 12 months. Some of that benefit is thought to be related to the microbiome that breast milk helps create. Babies who drink breast milk are more likely to have certain bacteria in their digestive tracts that help prevent obesity.

But the babies that had the lowest risk of obesity in the study were those that got only breast milk directly from the breast for the first three months of life. Why would that be?

To be able to breastfeed directly from the breast for three months, you have to be able to be with your baby constantly for three months. Mothers who can do that either have access to paid maternity leave or have enough resources to take an unpaid leave — or to stay at home with their babies and not work outside the home at all. Studies have shown that mothers who breastfeed longer are more likely to have higher incomes, more education, and private insurance.

These, then, are mothers who are also more likely to have access to and be able to afford healthy foods, to live in areas where there are safe places to exercise — and to be able to pay for sports and other forms of exercise as their children grow. It’s not just about how these babies are fed, but also about the context in which they are born and raised.

The way in which they are fed, though, is important. Babies who feed directly from the breast are less likely to be overfed. When they are full, they stop sucking, or switch to a “comfort” kind of sucking that doesn’t produce milk. When babies are fed from bottles, parents and caregivers are more likely to push them to finish the bottle; feeding becomes a bit less about appetite and more about volume and schedule.

Lets teach children to eat only when hungry?

Children have to be taught how to manage their food intake!

This topic reminds me of an incident I will share with you. I have a niece who was visiting me at one time. She was about 7 years old at the time. She came with her breakfast at about 10 am and ate all of it. By the way it was a burger king order of a hamburger sandwich, fries and yes a regular orange soda. She was junky at the time and I began to understand why. Do you believe at 12pm she said she was ready to eat again even though she ate just 2 hours ago? I said to her but you should not be hungry now because you just ate at 10. She looked at me and said, but aunty I always eat at 12 o clock.” Well my dear, you will not be eating at 12 o clock today. She asked why aunty? I said because you are not hungry. That was the end of that. Sometimes we as parents are the culprits in enabling our children’s obesity, so we have to be careful.

Learning to eat only when you are hungry and stop when you are full is a really good skill when it comes to preventing obesity. That’s why the American Academy of Pediatrics has encouraged parents to learn and use “responsive feeding,” that is, responding to the cues of babies and children of both hunger and being full. The motto is, “You provide, your child decides.”

What this study helps us see is that the link between breastfeeding and obesity prevention is part of a bigger picture we need to pay attention to if we want to fight the obesity epidemic. It shows us that we need to:

  • Advocate for maternity leave to stay at home to breastfeed your baby for at least 3 months.
  • Encourage your child to eat only when hungry and stop when they are full.
  • Understand obesity risk as part of a bigger societal issue — truly, as a social justice issue. All children need — and deserve — access to healthy foods and exercise. Try to give your children access to healthy foods and exercise.
  • Another consideration I have observed is that when babies are born, parents tend to give them more of the sweet foods. Be careful with this because they can grow up wanting the sweet foods more than the unsweetened foods that are healthier that the sweetened foods. Teach them to appreciate the veggies just as much as the fruits.

Prevent The Ruin Of Your Child’s Self Esteem: You have the power!

Self esteem is so important Mamas!

I have a little personal story I would like to share with you. One of my daughters when she was 10 years old, My husband and I noted that she was morbidly becoming obese. We noted that the obesity was making her to have a low self esteem, as her colleagues at school were now teasing her in school. You know what we did to help her ? We managed her eating and got her into a regular exercise program with us . We would take her with us three times per week during our walking exercise. She lost that weight quickly and got her self esteem back!

What are the rates of breastfeeding globally?

Despite the numerous benefits of breastfeeding, breastfeeding rates remain low in many parts of the world. Actions to increase the rate of breastfeeding include:

  • education and support of mothers throughout pregnancy and beyond;
  • support and protection of breastfeeding in the workplace;
  • implementation of the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative; and
  • implementation of and adherence to the International Code of Marketing of Breast-milk Substitutes. I was so happy to have had the privilege of breastfeeding my children. It was not always enjoyable, but because of the benefits, I pursued it. It is so good! My children proved it . I observe a high intelligence rate in them. They are smart intellectually.

Bottom Line

Breastfeeding and obesity do have a correlation. Breastfeeding is by far the best way to prevent childhood obesity. We ought to become our children’s advocate for healthy eating and activities that would help them to be happier and healthy. Remember you have the power of God within you to do all things through His strength. Do the best you can to breastfeed or give expressed breast milk if you are not breastfeeding and reduce the risk of your child developing obesity. If you have questions or comments let me know below. Please watch the exciting video below as Dr jones

explain.

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BREASTFEEDING AND Gestational Diabetes: Best Researched Data


Is Breastfeeding possible with Diabetes?

Gestational diabetes is a condition in which your blood sugar levels become high during pregnancy. It affects up to 10% of women who are pregnant in the U.S. each year. I have nursed many women who discovered that they had diabetes for the fist time , in their pregnancy. There was always one common denominator in the cases I saw.

It was that they all had a relative who had the condition. Most were apparently attending regular antenatal clinic and boom! the blood sugar levels were on fasting was higher that normal. I will help you to better understand how this condition affects breastfeeding ((Pd link) and give you some tips to help you manage it better.

Gestational Diabetes: What Causes It?

Here is the pancreas that regulates insulin

When you eat, your pancreas releases insulin, a hormone that helps move a sugar called glucose from your blood to your cells, which use it for energy.

During pregnancy, your placenta makes hormones that cause glucose to build up in your blood. Usually, your pancreas can send out enough insulin to handle it. But if your body can’t make enough insulin or stops using insulin as it should, your blood sugar levels rise, and you get gestational diabetes.

What Are the Types Of Diabetes?

There are two classes of gestational diabetes. Women with class Type 1 which can be controlled through diet and exercise. Those who have class type 2 need to take insulin or other medications.

Gestational diabetes usually goes away after you give birth. But it can affect your baby’s health, and it raises your risk of getting type 2 diabetes later in life. You can take steps so you and your baby stay healthy. I encourage you to do all you can to manage your condition because it can be a life threatening condition for both you and your little star.

Can I Breastfeed If I Have Gestational Diabetes?

I know you want to know if you can breastfeed if you have gestational diabetes. Guess what ? I have great news! Yes you can ! The majority of health experts say that breastfeeding is the best way to feed your baby, and that if you’re able to do it, you should give it a try. In an ideal world, you’d breastfeed exclusively for the first 6 months of your baby’s life. If you have diabetes, you may wonder if that’s true for you. No worries: If you want to breastfeed, having diabetes shouldn’t prevent you from doing so, and both you and your baby will reap some pretty impressive benefits.

his can happen for anyone, but diabetes can add some challenges. For instance, it could make your milk come in more slowly.

If you’re overweight — like many but not all women with type 2 diabetes — that sometimes makes nursing harder, especially early on.

Talk to your doctor or a lactation consultant if you need help or are unsure whether you should supplement with formula.

Breastfeeding Benefits for You and Your Baby

Breastfeeding has so many benefits mama. For your little star, it’s well-known that babies who are breastfed (regardless of whether Mom has diabetes) tend to have fewer health problems, including respiratory and ear infections, digestive trouble, and asthma. They might also be less likely to develop type 1 or type 2 diabetes.

Just in case we have some of you out there who may not be feeling too well. Here are some symptoms you might experience:

Gestational Diabetes Symptoms

Most women bypass the symptoms for pregnancy

Women with gestational diabetes usually don’t have symptoms or may chalk them up to pregnancy. Most find out that they have it during a routine screening.
You may notice that:

  • You’re thirstier than usual
  • You’re hungrier and eat more than usual
  • You pass your urine more than usual( pd link)

Gestational Diabetes Risk Factors

You’re more likely to get gestational diabetes if you:

  • Were overweight before you got pregnant
  • Are African-American, Asian, Hispanic, Alaska Native, Pacific Islander, or Native American
  • Have blood sugar levels that are higher than they should be but not high enough to be diabetes (this is called prediabetes)
  • Have a family member with diabetes
  • Have had gestational diabetes before
  • Have polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) or another health condition linked to problems with insulin
  • Have high blood pressurehigh cholesterolheart disease, or other medical complications
  • Have given birth to a large baby (weighing more than 9 pounds)
  • Have had a miscarriage
  • Have given birth to a baby who was stillborn or had certain birth defects
  • Are older than 25


Gestational Diabetes Tests and Diagnosis

Gestational diabetes usually happens in the second half of pregnancy. Your doctor will check for it between weeks 24 and 28, or sooner if you’re at high risk.

Your doctor will give you a glucose tolerance test: You’ll drink 50 grams of glucose in a sweet drink, which will raise your blood sugar. An hour later, you’ll take a blood glucose test to see how your body handled all that sugar. If the results show that your blood sugar is higher than a certain level, you’ll need a 3-hour oral glucose tolerance test, meaning you’ll get a blood glucose test 3 hours after you drink a 100-gram glucose drink. Your doctor can also test you by having you fast for 12 hours, then giving you a 75-gram glucose drink and a 2-hour blood glucose test.

If you’re at high risk but your test results are normal, your doctor might test you again later in your pregnancy to make sure you still don’t have it.

Are Your Meds Safe for Your Baby?

In most cases, a medication that was fine for you to use when you were pregnant should be fine to continue while nursing. But it’s always wise to check with your doctor.

Metformin is usually a good choice, and insulin should be OK. If you have type 1, you should certainly continue to take insulin, though you might find that you need less while breastfeeding than you did before you got pregnant.

Managing Gestational Diabetes: Making it Safe for You and Baby

If you have gestational diabetes, you’ll need treatment as soon as possible to keep yourself and your baby healthy during your pregnancy and delivery. Your doctor will ask you to:

  • Check your blood sugar levels four or more times a day. You will be taught how to do it in hospital.
  • Check your urine for ketones, chemicals that mean that your diabetes isn’t under control
  • Eat a healthy diet
  • Make exercise a habit
  • Be aware of the complications which are intra-uterine death, large babies, birth injuries, hemorrhage, a condition called preeclampsia, coma, death of mother or baby. Control of the condition is key in good management.

Your doctor will keep track of your weight and your baby’s development. They might give you insulin or another medicine to keep your blood sugar under control.

Exercise throughout your pregnancy. 

You can exercise when you have gestational diabetes with your doctor’s permission. Being active is a good way to help manage your blood sugar. Staying fit during pregnancy is also good for your posture and can curb some common problems, like backaches and fatigue.

  • Get active as soon as possible. Aim for 30 minutes of moderate activity most days of the week. Running, walking, swimming, and biking are good options.
  • Was there a workout that you were doing before you found out you were pregnant? Do you have an activity that you love? Check with your doctor to see if you can keep it up, if you should make some changes, or if it’s better to try something else.
  • Exercise can lower your blood sugar. So when you work out, always have a form of quick sugar with you, such as glucose tablets or hard candy.

Get the right prenatal care: Not only can your doctor screen you for this condition; they can offer advice on food, activity, and weight loss. They can also point you to other health professionals, like nutritionists, that can help.(paid link).

Morning sickness

If you have morning sickness, eat small healthy snacks. Nibble on crackers, cereal, or pretzels before you get out of bed. As you go through your day, have small meals often and avoid fatty, fried, and greasy foods.

If you are hospitalized, or if you are managed at home, you will have an interview with a dietitian to understand what your food portions should be. This is very important.

If you take insulin, make sure you’ve got a plan to deal with low blood sugar. Throwing up can make your glucose level drop. Talk to your doctor if you’re not sure what to do. Remember to never eat and not take your medication and vice versa, do not take your insulin and do not eat. This is a set up for blood sugar issues.

Ask your doctor any questions you need answers to.

Know the signs and symptoms of hypo and hyperglycemic episodes .e.g. dizziness, slurred speech, forgetfulness, low or high blood sugar levels.

Gestational Diabetes Prevention

You can lower your risk before you get pregnant by:

With type 1, you may find that the hormonal changes from giving birth and breastfeeding change the amount of insulin you need and throw your general testing and treating routine out of whack. You may want to work with a lactation consultant, diabetes educator, or nutritionist until you get the hang of things.

Low Blood Sugar: Keep snacks handy

Making milk takes a lot of energy, and breast milk is loaded with lactose, a type of sugar. When you nurse your baby and that sugar leaves your body, your blood sugar levels may dip by up to 25% and your blood sugar could drop too low (hypoglycemia).

Checking your blood sugar more often and planning ahead can help a lot. And It’s usually a good idea to have a snack before nursing and to keep something like fruit juice nearby while you breastfeed, in case you start to get hypoglycemic. Also, sip lots of water to stay hydrated.

You Might need some support

No matter what type of diabetes you have, you’ll probably need support from family and friends, too. Post partum can be tough

It can be hard for anyone with a newborn to find time to prepare healthy meals, but if you have diabetes, it’s extra important to eat well and regularly.

We have come to the end of a very intense post with breastfeeding and gestational diabetes. I hope you enjoyed it. If you are a newly discovered diabetic, I want you to ask God to heal you and help you and your baby to be safe. I want you to continue to do well. Remember you can speak with your doctor, nurse, lactation specialist, or even the dietitian about any issues . I wish you a very successful breastfeeding journey. Thank you for stopping and do come again. Do you have any breastfeeding goals? You can list it below.

I have an exciting video below on gestational diabetes that I think you will enjoy.

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https://breastfeedingsuccessfully.home.blog

https://breastfeedingsuccessfully.home.blog

https://breastfeedingsuccessfully.home.blog

Here goes our video on gestational diabetes: